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dominicm

Before the days of RC...

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...we had control line. Some still race with control line models today. Quite entertaining to watch. You get the impression that with one false move you could risk decapitation.

 

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I remember learning some of those steps at Victor Silvester's Dance Studio.

The early part of the video clearly shows the quickstep?

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Almost looks like a Monty Python sketch of some sort.

Team race was boring, I flew stunt and combat.

Alvin2.thumb.jpg.fbb6b10cf71940e7460e5ebb8c8e13bb.jpg

That was a VERY long time ago!

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I have imagined what would happened after the control line wrapped around your ears and the the line got shorter with each circuit. The motor would gradually get louder, right?

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You can tell those blokes are quite good friends. I was waiting for one to trip over then the whole thing would've gone to custard.

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Don't worry Arthur, I looked a bit like that to, to the amusement of my kid's. I also flew very similar models but we normally cremated them at the airfield after they came unstuck.

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that looks like a knobler

Yes. George Aldrich's Nobler I believe. Pretty famous in its day, along with Bob Palmer's Thunderbird.

rgmwa

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Yeah, it was loosely based on the Nobler, and incorporated some ideas from later stunt designs like longer moment arm fuselages and aerodynamic balances on the elevators.

 

Here's another one I had.

Didn't look much like the picture on the box by the time I'd finished with it...

AF_Spitfire.thumb.jpg.72b1519663014fa984b3f2d05a94fd04.jpg

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George Aldridge, that was the man.

I made numerous models of his "Peacemaker" and flew them for many years for both stunt and combat..

A great design.

Fox 35 Rocket powered, plus a temperamental highly modified Frog 500 (chop yer fingers off job).

Didn't have electric starters back in those days.

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Brings back memories. The "half acre" at Subiaco age 10 with my Sabre Trainer, the Causeway, Victoria Park on weekend afternoons.

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Brings back memories. The "half acre" at Subiaco age 10 with my Sabre Trainer, the Causeway, Victoria Park on weekend afternoons.

G'Day Mike, thought you might like this one...

(I colourised this in photoshop, taken from a newspaper clipping)

Dadcolour.thumb.jpg.d4886d70e64d380d3801b4ad667c9b0e.jpg

Len Armour 1963.

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I also built & flew Nobler and Thunderbird, several combat wings. Started with Aeroflyte Mustang trainer. later moved to radio models then built full size - Corby Starlet, Wag Aero Wagabond

Was member of Mercurians as 14 year old when Len was active. I also remember Mike B. with his single channel radio gear at the University playing fields at Perry Lakes.

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I also built & flew Nobler and Thunderbird, several combat wings. Started with Aeroflyte Mustang trainer. later moved to radio models then built full size - Corby Starlet, Wag Aero Wagabond

Was member of Mercurians as 14 year old when Len was active. I also remember Mike B. with his single channel radio gear at the University playing fields at Perry Lakes.

G'Day Kim, scratching my head trying to think who you are?

I'm Arthur, Len's son, and I was in the Mercurians from about 14 onwards, but maybe a few years after you.

I know dad was in the club when I was still a toddler.

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...we had control line. Some still race with control line models today. Quite entertaining to watch. You get the impression that with one false move you could risk decapitation.

 

Must be really good mates lol [what if one had a bo problem lol

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They probably all stunk of methanol and burnt caster oil (like are cars did for a week after going flying) so probably wouldn't have noticed:spot on:

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8286D2C6-F956-4529-95B2-839206B47EDC.thumb.jpeg.948946415351f89a824bedb0311e09d3.jpeg These were taken about 57 years ago, FAI Team Racer and Combat Control line. RC was just starting to arrive in OZ, transmitters and receivers had valves and were enormously expensive with 2 chanels.

E4FE7C03-CD20-47C5-AED7-7184FA8B8301.thumb.jpeg.9ee542453f4b0ed68b62284cc06748c7.jpeg

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They probably all stunk of methanol and burnt caster oil (like are cars did for a week after going flying) so probably wouldn't have noticed:spot on:

Most Team racers ran diesels so, they all smelt of caster oil, kero and ether, and maybe a little amyl nitrate.

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Quite true Arthur. I mainly used a Fox 35 Rocket glow-plug motor for combat, but had an Oliver Tiger Junior diesel in a 1/2A team racer which was a real screamer. Good fun, but they both stunk.

I was asked by the chemist a couple of times what I wanted amyl nitrate for? I found out later that some used a bit in making "poppers", but I was never into the drugs scene.

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The "cetane" improver I used was Iso amyl nitrite which is also a vasodilator that will lower your blood pressure dangerously is exposed to enough if it.

It makes high revving diesel model engines run more evenly. I extensively modified a Taipan (Gordon Burford engine) successfully in the late 50's for 1/2 A team racing. It wouldn't run properly without the additive. Nev

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There was nothing better than a high-revving short-stroke motor running a small prop, to make one's middle finger look like the inside of a fishes gills.

Didn't have electric starter back in those days. That's about the same time as I learned "The Hand Jive".

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My first engine at age 11 was a Frog 150 diesel that ruined all of the fingers of both hands before I got the gist of starting it.( life wasn't meant to be easy) Nev

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