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Butch

Rans Coyote S6, info please.

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Hi all,

Does anyone fly or own a Rans S6 Coyote?

I'm looking around to buy my first aircraft and they seem to be reasonably priced, get good reviews on the internet and are easy to fly for a lower hours pilot.

Most are kit built -19 rego, any concerns about someone else's build?

I know nothing about fabric covered aircraft, are there any draw backs compared to metal?

thanks in advance,

cheers and Merry Xmas to all ! :cheers:

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Hi all,

Does anyone fly or own a Rans S6 Coyote?

I'm looking around to buy my first aircraft and they seem to be reasonably priced, get good reviews on the internet and are easy to fly for a lower hours pilot.

Most are kit built -19 rego, any concerns about someone else's build?

I know nothing about fabric covered aircraft, are there any draw backs compared to metal?

thanks in advance,

cheers and Merry Xmas to all ! :cheers:

 

If you contact the Holbrook flying club...

Contact Us

 

One of the members was the importer years ago, and I believe that a few Rans are hangared there.

 

I own a 912 ul S6S and the only things that I wasn't happy with was the elevator trim, the uneven fuel flow from the wing tanks and the difficulties in filling / bleeding the radiator.

 

Also check out the Ransclan

 

RANS CLAN Forums

 

Kiwi

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If you contact the Holbrook flying club...

Contact Us

 

One of the members was the importer years ago, and I believe that a few Rans are hangared there.

 

I own a 912 ul S6S and the only things that I wasn't happy with was the elevator trim, the uneven fuel flow from the wing tanks and the difficulties in filling / bleeding the radiator.

 

Also check out the Ransclan

 

RANS CLAN Forums

 

Kiwi

Thanks Kiwi,

I'll take a look,

cheers Butch

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Hi all,

Does anyone fly or own a Rans S6 Coyote?

I'm looking around to buy my first aircraft and they seem to be reasonably priced, get good reviews on the internet and are easy to fly for a lower hours pilot.

Most are kit built -19 rego, any concerns about someone else's build?

I know nothing about fabric covered aircraft, are there any draw backs compared to metal?

thanks in advance,

cheers and Merry Xmas to all ! :cheers:

 

I built mine, and I fly it regularly. The S6 is a very friendly plane, easy to fly, rugged and very roomy. Mine has the bubble doors, which ensures that you can even go up with a couple of big guys and not have shoulders rubbing.

If you do buy one, ask for which type of wing it has. Depending on the wing type and age, there are differences in MTOW and speeds. It also supports a range of engines, starting with a Rotax 503, all the way up to 120HP Jabiru/CAMit, UL-Power and such. I have a CAMit 3300 up front. There's an active Rans community at www.ransclan.com where there's people with knowledge, ready to give you advice.

 

As far as fabric, the stuff that Rans uses (Superflite) holds up well over time. Repairs are a bit more involved than what you'd do on metal aircraft, but well understood. My plane was built between 2000 and 2007, covered in 2003 and painted in 2005. The attached picture is from this summer.

86639_1498380978.thumb.jpg.87ecdee9789444cbd998d4e1e018082a.jpg

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My experience of Rans S6s both here and in the UK are that they have an undercarriage that is designed for operation off long US tarmac runways.

 

The legs are thin and slot into housings that are welded directly to the fuselage framework with no trailing links to prevent them moving backwards eg after a hard(ish) landing on grass. If that happens you can end up with a major repair job requiring (as of one incident in the UK) a complete new fuselage assembly imported with long delay from the US (luckily for the owner concerned, paid for by the insurer).

 

Another friend here in France had a Rans S12 with the same legs. He bent one after a hard landing on a rough grass runway and ordered in a replacement pair from the States. By the time they arrived he had had a new pair fabricated locally here in France - the reason given was that Rans manufacture in short runs as and when they have sufficient orders to make it economically justifiable.

 

If you will operate from a flat hard runway you should not have any problems. If not and you will be flying off rough grass, I personally would not touch one because of the above, despite them being otherwise a pretty little ultralight. Just my opinion.

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Hi all,

Does anyone fly or own a Rans S6 Coyote?

I'm looking around to buy my first aircraft and they seem to be reasonably priced, get good reviews on the internet and are easy to fly for a lower hours pilot.

Most are kit built -19 rego, any concerns about someone else's build?

I know nothing about fabric covered aircraft, are there any draw backs compared to metal?

thanks in advance,

cheers and Merry Xmas to all ! :cheers:

 

 

Hiya Butch. . .Ping my email and I'll send you a Rans S6 POH in .PDF format. . .

I have around 190 hours on these aircraft and they are OK. No nasty surprises, and no gear collapses. I've flown 503, 582 and 912 versions. quite a cheap machine and fun to fly. They start at prices around £6K for a 2 stroke model in the UK, but there are a lot of them around.

 

The POH is in 'Americanese' so all the quoted speeds are in MPH. . .and I wouldn't take those as gospel either. . especially some of the approach speed recommendations. . .bit too slow in reality. . . Anyway, it may be of some use.

 

Depends which variation you're looking at, some have the throttle control mounted on the front of the lower seat frame, connected by a torsion bar to a parallel control on the right hand seat. some have the 'Push Pull throttle on the centre panel. Older models have a slightly smaller fin area with the top of it angled downwards,as with the top of the rudder. Whereas later ones have a slightly bigger fin area withe the top of it, and the rudder, level. I've noticed NO difference in rudder control authority on either. On most of them the trim control is a vertically mounted plastic 'Cogwheel' between the seats, alongside the 'Handbrake' style flap lever.

 

Phil.

 

<airside4me@gmail.com>

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Hi all,

Does anyone fly or own a Rans S6 Coyote?

I'm looking around to buy my first aircraft and they seem to be reasonably priced, get good reviews on the internet and are easy to fly for a lower hours pilot.

Most are kit built -19 rego, any concerns about someone else's build?

I know nothing about fabric covered aircraft, are there any draw backs compared to metal?

thanks in advance,

cheers and Merry Xmas to all ! :cheers:

 

G’day Butch,

I have recently purchased a RANS S6 Coyote II from a builder at Holbrook.

I have done a fair bit of homework on this model plane and it ticks a lot of the boxes that I wanted.

The aircraft I bought is still in its infancy and has just clocked over 40 hours.

Having owned a Cherokee 140 in the past I certainly appreciate the difference in running costs and the fun factor is huge!

I am located in Echuca and if you are nearby and are still interested I would be happy to show you the plane and take you for a ride.

Just pm with your details.

Regards,

Shane.

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Quality is quite high on all their models. Far better than average and perhaps the best of it's type of build. Nev

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Hi Shane'

I live in Heathcote and fly out of Bendigo.

I was interested in the plane you purchased when I saw it online but didn't go on with it. Changed my mind about buying a fabric covered plane.

You have got a good buy as it's like a new aircraft and have since found out being fabric is no problem.

Might see you around in Bendigo or Echuca, I will keep an eye out...would love to come for a ride,

thanks Butch

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Butch I am off to the Rans factory in less than 5 weeks time to look at the S21 and the S20 kits. If I get my basic class 2 medical on thursday it will be the S21 if I dont get the ok then it will be the S20

 

The open days have a heap of classes on how to..like covering in rag also painting. I hope to be getting flights of each type

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Sounds like a great trip KC.

Most Rans aircraft seem like they are user friendly to build and short build time.

Good luck ......enjoy!

cheers Butch.

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I winder if the Wing design has perhaps been addressed in the newer models,. . we have had serious / fatal accident reports re Rans S6 models in the UK,, where pilots have mishandled the final turn and flipped inverted.

 

To my mind, there was nothing wrong with the aircraft, but a LOT wrong with the way it was handled. ( HINT : If you did the same thing with a C-152. . you would achieve precisely the same result.)

 

Just my opinion.. . .but the information ought to be out there all the same.. . ..

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Sounds like a great trip KC.

Most Rans aircraft seem like they are user friendly to build and short build time.

Good luck ......enjoy!

cheers Butch.

Yes - they are pretty user-friendly - Phil Perry is right - the accidents which have occurred have happened because the pilot got too slow turning on to final. The later wing is much-improved from the earlier options. However they do take some time to build - most part-timers would take at least a year.

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Thanks Micro. . .the fatal accidents involving Rans S6 models have been down to pilots transitioning from a MUCH simpler type,. . Weedhoppers, Cyclone AX3s, . .X'Air Mk ones. . . which Don't bite you n the ar$e if you get the Base to final Turn badly wrong by flying according to Groundspeed and Wind, WHICH believe ot or not. .a LOT of newly qualified pilots have been seen to do. . . .

 

This is because they were presented with an Aircraft which is a TRUE 'Stick and Rudder' type. . . whereas the ones that they trained with were NOT. If only their Instructors were Awake to this problem. . .then a LOT of innocent flyeyrs might well still be flying, I Cannot in all conscience blame the students. . it's the bloody Instructors who should shoulder this Horrible burden ).

 

I've been banned from Two forums for pointing out this OBVIOUS fact. . .they don't like it 'Up 'em Mr Mainwaring'. . . ( Dad's Army ).

 

I don't care,. . I WILL if I get banned from here though. . . ( Got nowhere else to spread me bile see. . . )

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No plane is immune from stalling if you don't fly it properly. If you loaded it so it won't stall you would have difficulty landing it.. It would have to be quite nose heavy, or have insufficient elevator authority . Nev

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No plane is immune from stalling if you don't fly it properly. If you loaded it so it won't stall you would have difficulty landing it.. It would have to be quite nose heavy, or have insufficient elevator authority . Nev

 

Sorry Nev,. . .that post should have been qualified somewhat. What I was getting at was this. Manu flying schools in the UK were using the Cyclone AX3, as it was cheapp to buy and run and for small schools and One Man flying schools, ot as an ideal opportunity to make some money out of aviation. Problem was, it was a heap of DUNG, and all turns had to be made using the rudder as the primary turn control. The Ailerons produced an Awful Adverse Yaw effect, so that those being taught to fly in these crap machines were using rudder, NOT aileron to turn all the time. The only reason they used the Stick, was for pitch control.

 

I do not know if there are any schools using these bloody deathtraps i the UK at the moment, there WERE only last year. . . The problem with being taught to fly in one of these contraptions ( Annd there are Hundreds of people who have been ) is that once they step into a type having PROPER CONTROLS. . .they are having problems. And this has been cited as the cause for several crashes and deaths when someone tries to fly a Rans S6 or similar, after having learned to fly in a piece of $hit. which should ever have been allowed to fly at all. This also applies to other Early Ultralight models which do not use proper three axis controls.

 

There is NOTHING WRONG WITH THE RANS S6. there is a LOT wring with certain flying schools. and I hope that the CAA will sort them out..

 

Last local fatality : ( Shifnal Airfield Staffordshire ) Man learns to fly in an AX3. . .buys one and flies it for three years without incident.

 

Buys a Rans S6 582. Refuses Free conversion training from a 20,000 hour instructor based on the same site and very familiar with the AX3 AND the Rans models. . . and how they have distinct differences..... This ( in the UK is Known as 'Differences Training)

One day later,. . .stalls in the final turn, spins it and kills himself and his best friend.

 

sometimes you just can't fix stupid. It is difficult to defeat the Darwin award, if the contestants are so self assured. . . .

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The emphasis on "differences" is a good idea Phil. You'd probably get people saying things like " I'VE" NEVER had any problem with that Plane! and poo pooing the cissy approach etc but it's still a good idea.

REGARDLESS of ailerons and adverse yaw the control that causes the stall is the elevator. IF the ball is miles to one side it will probably flick roll at the same time or just enter a spin. The Pilot should be taught all about this. I've yet to see any plane loaded and trimmed within the normal range that will stall by itself.. In an unfamiliar situation where the nose goes down, most untrained pilots will pull the stick back all the way. If they pick up dropped wings instinctively with ailerons when slow or stalled as well, it's only a matter of time before they are a statistic.. You don't need a $#!t plane. A DHC-1 Chipmunk will bite you if you are not trained well. Do we dumb down the training? I think so.. Nev

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Hi Shane'

I live in Heathcote and fly out of Bendigo.

I was interested in the plane you purchased when I saw it online but didn't go on with it. Changed my mind about buying a fabric covered plane.

You have got a good buy as it's like a new aircraft and have since found out being fabric is no problem.

Might see you around in Bendigo or Echuca, I will keep an eye out...would love to come for a ride,

thanks Butch

G'day Butch, I'm going (driving) to Echuca in an hour or so; if the wx is O.k I'll be taking the Coyote out for a few laps.

If you would like to go for a jolly I should be around anytime after 14 O'clock! Ph 0438 118 126

Cheers.

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G'day Butch, I'm going (driving) to Echuca in an hour or so; if the wx is O.k I'll be taking the Coyote out for a few laps.

If you would like to go for a jolly I should be around anytime after 14 O'clock! Ph 0438 118 126

Cheers.

Hi Shane,

just got in from work..1600hrs

thanks for the offer.

Hope you get in a few laps, I will have to fly up to Echuca on a weekend and catch up,

cheers.

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The emphasis on "differences" is a good idea Phil. You'd probably get people saying things like " I'VE" NEVER had any problem with that Plane! and poo pooing the cissy approach etc but it's still a good idea.

REGARDLESS of ailerons and adverse yaw the control that causes the stall is the elevator. IF the ball is miles to one side it will probably flick roll at the same time or just enter a spin. The Pilot should be taught all about this. I've yet to see any plane loaded and trimmed within the normal range that will stall by itself.. In an unfamiliar situation where the nose goes down, most untrained pilots will pull the stick back all the way. If they pick up dropped wings instinctively with ailerons when slow or stalled as well, it's only a matter of time before they are a statistic.. You don't need a $#!t plane. A DHC-1 Chipmunk will bite you if you are not trained well. Do we dumb down the training? I think so.. Nev

 

 

Guess I'm Just having a bitch about certain OLD types of Ultralight aircraft Nev. . . The AX3 won't spin no matter What you do to it,. . .therein lies a serious training problem,. . .it doesn't stall cleanly, it just 'Mushes gently. Not a good training machine for those wishing to fly 'Proper' stick and rudder aircraft ! ( such as the nice Rans models to which this thread refers )

 

It wasn't so long ago that pilots trained on the Weightshift / Flexwing types were allowed to jump into a three axis control machine with no formal differences training at all. SOME of these lucky people are still alive ( ! ) There is now a Five Hour minimum for crossover instruction, which can be extended at the discretion of the Instructor concerned. It's a shame that it often takes some blood guts and grief before there is any action . .

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[quote=rollerball, postbV18

 

5814, member: 15681]they have an undercarriage that is designed for operation off long US tarmac runways.

 

 

Don't tell this Rans owner about that, you might stop him having fun.

:smile:

 

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