Jump to content
  • Welcome to Recreational Flying!
    A compelling community experience for all aviators
    Intuitive, Social, Engaging...Registration is FREE.
    Register Log in
red750

Puppy dies in overhead locker on United Airlines flight.

Recommended Posts

A 10-month-old puppy died on a United Airlines flight because flight attendants allegedly insisted on the dog going in the overhead compartment for the duration of the flight.

 

Full report here

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Surely only a third world airline would allow animals in the cabin.

I would rather be seated near a Pup than some of the ferals that I have sat near on planes
  • Like 3
  • Agree 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No news, just wanted to get away from that "...lost foot..." post that comes every time I scan the forums list.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would equate the cross section of dogs to being similar in character to humans, most are friendly and reasonable, and then you get your a-holes as well.

I'm not so sure... I've rarely met a dog I didn't get along with, but I've met an awful lot of people I'd rather not be around.

Take my neighbours for example. There appears to be about 5 or 6 (it changes) Feral adults living there with a few kids that don't have a hope of growing up to be decent people, but their dog is lovely.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Surely only a third world airline would allow animals in the cabin.

Apparently in the US people are so damaged that they are permitted to take their "emotional support / psychiatric service animals" on US internal flights. From American Airlines site:

Flying in the cabin

Fully-trained service animals and emotional support / psychiatric service animals may fly in the cabin at no charge if they meet the requirements.

Requirements

 

  • 1 emotional support / psychiatric service animal per person
  • Animal must be a cat or dog (trained miniature horse may be permitted as a service animal); 4 months or older
  • Animal must be clean and well-behaved

  • Animals must be able to fit at your feet, under your seat or in your lap (lap animals must be smaller than a 2-year old child)

  • If the animal is in a kennel, it must fit under the seat in front of you with the animal in it

Emotional support / psychiatric service animals cannot:

  • Be seated in an exit row

  • Protrude into or block aisles

  • Occupy a seat

  • Eat from tray tables

If your animal doesn’t fit within the allowed spaces, you may need to:

  • Rebook on a flight with more open seats

  • Buy a ticket for the animal

  • Transport the animal as a checked pet

Animal behavior

 

Emotional support / psychiatric service animals must be trained to behave properly in public and they won’t be permitted in the cabin if they display any form of disruptive behavior that can’t be successfully corrected or controlled, including but not limited to:

 

  • Growling
  • Biting or attempting to bite

  • Jumping on or lunging at people

 

Emotional support / psychiatric service animals must be in your control at all times by leash and / or harness.

 

If this behavior is observed at any point during your journey and isn't corrected or controlled, the animal will be considered a pet and all requirements and applicable fees will apply.

Animal restrictions

Emotional support / psychiatric service animals

 

Emotional support / psychiatric service animals assist individuals with emotional, psychiatric or cognitive disabilities. Specific training isn’t required for animals to meet this classification.

 

Only cats and dogs are accepted as emotional support animals. Advanced notice and approval is required to bring an emotional support / psychiatric service animal with you in the cabin.

Trained service animals

 

Trained service animals have been specifically trained to perform life functions for individuals with disabilities, including but not limited to:

 

  • Visual impairments
  • Deafness

  • Seizures

  • Mobility impairments

 

Dogs and cats are accepted as service animals; miniature horses will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

 

We encourage advanced notice for service animals, but it isn’t required

 

As the requirements for transporting each type of animal differ, our employees are trained to ask certain questions to determine the classification applicable to your animal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a US internal flight a few years ago (I think it was AA) I sat next to a young guy with an emotional support dog.

The dog was brilliant - sat at his feet without a noise the whole flight. The guy patted the dog as we took off and landed as that's when he (the guy!) got nervous.

As others have noted - I've sat next to feral humans that should be banned from flying, this dog was a pleasure to travel next to.

The guy told me that having this dog has enabled him to travel to places that he would otherwise never have been able to go to.

 

Cheers,

Neil

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It can be a great help to passengers. Some get extremely nervous with a strong fear of flying that nearly overwhelms them. Nev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course, this is what happens when the dog decides it isn't so supportive anymore...And as a side note - check out the "Emotional support peacock" in the article...I can understand a parrot or budgie, but a peacock?!?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Does this mean, I may now be refused boarding, if I want to fly with my emotional support crocodile?? :cheezy grin:

I've seen blokes walking around with pet rats on their shoulder. I wonder how the emotional support fox terrier would go, when he spotted a large rat on board?! :cheezy grin:

 

I don't mind animals, and I get along with virtually all of them - but I get a bit fed up with pet owners expecting all others to fawn over, or be accepting of, their pets.

I especially dislike people dragging their pets along to major events such as markets or shows. It must be very stressful for the pets, being surrounded with thousands of strange people, and all towering over them.

 

What about people flying, who are very fearful of animals? There's a lot of people fearful of dogs.

In any other situation, people can avoid and skirt around animals they're fearful of, but in a commercial aircraft with people crammed in like sardines, there's nowhere to go for them.

Edited by onetrack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It can be a great help to passengers. Some get extremely nervous with a strong fear of flying that nearly overwhelms them. Nev

My wife used to be rigid with fear, so we never got on a plane for our first 30 years. (Her brother was a pilot and a mate of his scared the crap out of her on a joy flight.) I had resigned myself to never travelling OS.

A decade ago she surprised me, by not only conquering that fear, but becoming a keen air traveller.

All this is due to a course called "Fearless Flyers", run by women Qantas pilots.

  • Like 2
  • Informative 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not just women either. I came out of Schipol in the best part of a 747 (wide seats and spacing) and the bloke next to me just covered his whole body and head with a sheet and never emerged till after the landing in the ME about 8 hours later when he told me flying scared him out of his wits. .Nev

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fear of heights is about the only fear we are born with. We are irrational about the risks of flying as a result. This explains why CASA gets so much power over us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like France. People take their dogs everywhere there - buses, cafes, restaurants etc.

 

They are man's best friend, but we exclude them from so many places. If they're well trained and socialised there's no reason they shouldn't be allowed in more places.

  • Agree 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They are great friends but unfortunately in France you have to watch very carefully where you walk or you tread on it. Nev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like your thought Marty, but how would you tell good dogs and owners from bad ones? There was a case around here where the bad owner let his pit bulls kill some poor old ladies lap dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like your thought Marty, but how would you tell good dogs and owners from bad ones? There was a case around here where the bad owner let his pit bulls kill some poor old ladies lap dog.

You get that now on dog beaches and parks. I don't know how they prevent it in France, but I'm sure a customer who came into a cafe with an untrained dog would find themself turfed out pretty quick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later for your post to be seen If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...