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fatmal

Test of drone vs. Mooney wing

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I'd be interested to see it done in a real environment, i.e. with air flowing over the wing at real speed.

 

 

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This test was on a mooney wing, I would expect much greater damage to an LSA aircraft even though it would fly at about half the speed given the lighter materials used. Also LSA and recreational A/C usually fly at lower altitudes than the mooney in cruise. Pity any pilot with an open cockpit at any speed.

 

 

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... Pity any pilot with an open cockpit at any speed.

Another reason to use polycarbonate for the front window.

 

 

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The impact damage would be much the same but it's possible the wing could open up or distort due airflow dynamic forces, where the wing is moving through the air .In any case the actual potential would be more as the component is already structurally loaded and an impact force will normally add to it... I would be worried about windscreens lift struts and cables, control cables fabric opening up etc. The faster planes will suffer more as it's a V squared equation. I've seen actual strikes where the bird went 1/2 way to the trailing edge an a Cessna 180. It's surprising it didn't come off. The main species involved back then was the wedgetail eagle but I've dodged pelicans, frigate birds and hit plenty of seagulls. The main risk to the larger planes is windsceeen and engine ingestion. Nev

 

 

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Perhaps if it's relevant to your operation. The pelicans, Coolangatta airport .The seagulls Kingsford Smith (Sydney). The Frigate Birds Christmas Island. The reason for being low? Trying to touch down on the appropriate part of the runway. Nev

 

 

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Something that wasn't mentioned was the possibility of the drone's Lion battery catching fire inside the wing after impact. If that happened with the fuel in the wing, I'm reasonably sure the aircraft would not survive long enough to land.

 

 

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The inefficiency of the method of getting lift must be a limiting factor. A helicopter is a "rotary wing " whereas these are just upward thrusters vectored by tilting. (This one sat and may be well out of context.) sent anyhow. Nev

 

 

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You can avoid those types of birdstrikes by not flying so low over nude beaches.095_cops.gif.448479f256bea28624eb539f739279b9.gif

Usually the drones are above me.

 

 

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I don't know the speed of a Mooney.

 

Most drones I've watched are almost stationery.

 

Mooney's must fly at 225 MPH.

 

Hummel bird's only 140 MPH

 

spacesailor

 

 

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Repeat the test in a wind-tunnel with the airflow over the wing at normal cruising-speed for a better test of a real-world situation. Either way I think there will be significant wing-damage. As for the drone...

 

 

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