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[TD] An interesting one from overseas. The pilot obviously wasn't keeping within glide distance, but was looking for the 3 degree approach. He also did not take into consideration what can happen with a slipping approach and being low on fuel in the tank in use. Any other ideas from those who know the Bonanza.

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[TD]January 26, 2019, Lexington, KY

Beechcraft S35 Bonanza

At about 1540 Eastern time, the airplane was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on final approach. The airline transport pilot and his passenger were not injured. Visual conditions prevailed.

According to the pilot, the airplane was “high” on the approach and he “slipped” it until descending to his desired approach angle. At about 1000 feet AGL, the pilot added power to arrest the descent but the engine did not respond. Remedial actions were unsuccessful at restoring power, and the airplane lacked the altitude necessary to glide to the runway. During the off-field landing, the airplane struck several fences which divided the property and substantially damaged the left wing, fuselage and empennage. The airplane came to rest 1.4 miles from the approach end of the runway. Thirty-seven gallons of fuel were removed from the fuel tanks during recovery operations.[/TD]

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We can rule out ice, in the carb that is?

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I wonder what the "remedial actions" were. Fuel pumps on (if it/they was off), carb heat, change tanks and restart are the 3 basic ones I'd use. 140 litres of fuel still in the tanks is a fair bit.

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When sideslipping any plane you must realise the fuel tank openings may allow air into the system. An airline pilot should know that "low fuel" go arounds may limit the pitch attitudes available for the same reason. (air in fuel tank pickups) Suitable tank selection for approach may be a consideration also. The "best " fuel system would have non return valves at each tank pickup/outlet and with all pumps on any tank will provide fuel and no air will get in until that stops happening A Bonanza engine is fuel. injected, pretty much eliminates icing as a cause. Nev

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When sideslipping any plane you must realise the fuel tank openings may allow air into the system. An airline pilot should know that "low fuel" go arounds may limit the pitch attitudes available for the same reason. (air in fuel tank pickups) Suitable tank selection for approach may be a consideration also. The "best " fuel system would have non return valves at each tank pickup/outlet and with all pumps on any tank will provide fuel and no air will get in until that stops happening A Bonanza engine is fuel. injected, pretty much eliminates icing as a cause. Nev

 

As Nev states : the A36 I used to operate had yellow bands on the fuel gauges, not to be used for take of or landing as per the POH. I can’t remember the actual quantities but about 1/4 tanks from memory. If you were arriving with min fuel you just burnt into the yellow on one tank in cruise/decent and kept the other above the yellow for circuit.

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For an ATPL to overlook 'select fullest tank' in the pre-landing checks is surprising as its in the 'Before Landing' checklist. The Bonanza was probably configured for final with full flap & gear down, with prop in fine pitch and that allows for a very rapid height loss just by pulling power to idle. No need for fancy stuff like slipping. But, loss of power in that config. means a very rapid height loss in the Bo and pilot might not have had time to select the other tank plus the AUX fuel pump to HI.

 

If I remember rightly, the AUX fuel pump isn't on the pre-landing checklist. The other critical feature in the Bo is that the fuel tank selector must be placed precisely into the 'detent' because there is simply no fuel if not so. You need to practise this tank selection at altitude during the endorsement, because doing it for the 1st time on final may not end well.

 

happy days,

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The pilot only had basic med, not saying that was a factor but as we get older we make more mistakes.

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