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MB-700 -

 

During the late 1930s, the French Air Ministry began to consider the development of a fighter made from non-strategic materials i.e. wood, to safeguard from any possible steel shortage in the event of war.

 

Bloch responded to the specification with their prototype, the MB-700. It was constructed completely from wood and had a stressed skin. The wing was of one piece with two spars, the fuel tank of 77 Imperial Gallon capacity, residing between the spars in the middle of the fuselage.

 

The MB-700 was powered by a 14-cylinder Gnone Rhone radial engine of 700 hp. Despite the low power of its engine it had sparkling performance. It had a maximum speed of 550 km/h at 13,000 feet and an endurance of 2 hours. Planned armament for the machine was a pair of 20 mm cannons and a pair of 7.5 mm machine guns.

 

The aircraft had only completed about a dozen flight test hours when the Germans occupied the Buc airfield in France. For some unfortunate reason the French did not ferry the aircraft to safety ahead of the advancing German column as once the Germans happened upon it, they promptly burnt it to the ground believing it to be a booby-trap.

 

 

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[ATTACH]7792.vB[/ATTACH]

 

This one was a touch on the large size too.

 

This 36 cylinder engine was destined to be the largest reciprocating engine ever built. The displacement was 7,755 cubic inches. When compared to Lycoming's largest production engine in production today which displaces 720 cubic inches, it was more than 10 times larger!

 

This huge engine was 10 feet long, 5 feet in diameter and weighed 6,050 pounds. It produced 5,000 HP at 2,600 RPM, and the target was 7,000. It used 580 GPH of av gas at the 5,000 HP rating.

 

There were nine overhead camshafts which could be shifted axially for METO power in one position and cruise at the other. Two great shafts emerged for coaxial propellers, and there was a two speed gear-change box between the crankshaft and the propeller shafts.

 

Development of the XR-7755 began at Lycoming in Williamsport in the summer of 1943. With the end of World War II in 1945, the military no longer had a need for an engine of this size, and development of the XR-7755 stopped at the prototype stage.

 

During those years, Lycoming put together a team, under the leadership of VP Engineering Clarence Wiegman, to develop this super-size engine.

 

The engine now resides at Silver Hill of the Smithsonian Institute.

 

xr7755b.jpg.bc561e09efa8c009c4780be691ff1b48.jpg

 

 

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Guest pelorus32
[ATTACH]9345[/ATTACH]

 

This 36 cylinder engine was destined to be the largest reciprocating engine ever built. The displacement was 7,755 cubic inches. When compared to Lycoming's largest production engine in production today which displaces 720 cubic inches, it was more than 10 times larger!

 

This huge engine was 10 feet long, 5 feet in diameter and weighed 6,050 pounds. It produced 5,000 HP at 2,600 RPM, and the target was 7,000. It used 580 GPH of av gas at the 5,000 HP rating.

 

There were nine overhead camshafts which could be shifted axially for METO power in one position and cruise at the other. Two great shafts emerged for coaxial propellers, and there was a two speed gear-change box between the crankshaft and the propeller shafts.

 

Development of the XR-7755 began at Lycoming in Williamsport in the summer of 1943. With the end of World War II in 1945, the military no longer had a need for an engine of this size, and development of the XR-7755 stopped at the prototype stage.

 

During those years, Lycoming put together a team, under the leadership of VP Engineering Clarence Wiegman, to develop this super-size engine.

 

The engine now resides at Silver Hill of the Smithsonian Institute.

Interesting that the text says that it was destined to become the largest reciprocating engine ever built.

 

I think that is just plain wrong. Of course it depends what you mean by "largest" but today we certainly have engines (MAN Diesel - the old B&W Two Stroke engines) that have 100MW or more of power. They are certainly large engines. That's only one example.

 

Worth a look:MAN Diesel SE - MARINE

 

Regards

 

Mike

 

 

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i think that this quest has been dragged out long enough

 

the aircraft is the Me P 1101 the very first jet with variable geometry wings and the inspiration, after the Yanks dragged the protoptype home for the Bell X-5

 

heaps more information at

 

http://www.luft46.com/mess/mep1101.html

 

best of wishes Davidh

 

 

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