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Guess the plane


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Yep. That must have been too easy!

It’s the weird and interesting variants that interest me - only a couple of these were built from existing airframes and one was used post war as a racer - the one you picture

 

 

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double points for the car, which I really don't know what it is.

 

I'll back myself for a quid and say that it's a 1926 Renault.

I'll take the points and that quid. Pre-war Renaults mostly had that unique double sloper enclosed grille.

 

It's a 5CV Citroen boat tail. It however has an extended front valance panel obviously to mount that front bumber bar that the originals never had, and I have never seen those wheels from a Citroen before. To my knowledge all pre-War Citroens had solid disc wheels.

 

I'm a member of AussieFrogs car forum for French car enthusiasts by the way. Yep, sad life.

 

 

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Hi Ben,

 

I think you’re right and it does have boat tail, with a wooden polished carvel top. When I flew in (it’s my Curtiss) this fellow turned up in this beautiful little car and we both took a photo.

 

Cheers

 

Vev

 

 

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.... When I flew in (it’s my Curtiss) ....

It's absolutely gorgeous. I assume it's a restoration rather than a replica?

 

Nice co-incidental colour match with the car too.

 

Perhaps I'm a little biased too - last week I ordered the paint for the plane I'm building, almost the same colours and with olive trim, it's nice to get a better idea of what it'll look like.

 

 

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I'll take the points and that quid. Pre-war Renaults mostly had that unique double sloper enclosed grille.It's a 5CV Citroen boat tail. It however has an extended front valance panel obviously to mount that front bumber bar that the originals never had, and I have never seen those wheels from a Citroen before. To my knowledge all pre-War Citroens had solid disc wheels.

 

I'm a member of AussieFrogs car forum for French car enthusiasts by the way. Yep, sad life.

Hey Bex, I didn't recognize the car but like you, I followed Aussiefrogs for some years. A great site(then) and it reminded my of my old Citroen GS that I used to thrash around in. Bloody marvelous car with the best suspension ever. Flying Carpet ride.

 

277492246_DalalHauledout3.jpg.288df6e49e227707d0580dfbbaa56abf.jpg Only photo I have of her. The boat is a Robert Tucker 'Debutante'. A 22ft, flush deck, triple keeled and Bermudian rigged sloop. Wish I could have bought them both to Oz. Sadly missed.

 

 

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It's absolutely gorgeous. I assume it's a restoration rather than a replica?Nice co-incidental colour match with the car too.

Its the real deal, it was restored in 1979 and won the 1980 Silver Wings at Oshkosh and then won it again a few years later.

 

Vev

 

 

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I'll take the points and that quid. Pre-war Renaults mostly had that unique double sloper enclosed grille.

Damn! I googled "1926 Renault" and "1926 Peugeot", but I forgot about Citroens.

 

I also misinterpreted the number plate, RCS-026. I thought it stood for Renault C5 - 1926, but as Bex says, the inter-war Renaults had a funny bonnet.

 

Pretty little car, though. It reminds me of Brum, who is from Birmingham, but, like a lot of TV stars, made his money and retired to the Cotswolds, and now lives in Bourton-on-the-Water.

 

upload_2017-12-22_16-8-55.jpeg.11f3a5b61e5cfdc1fb0e6b537283f958.jpeg

 

 

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Anybody who has worked on Citroens has tried to forget them, but it requires a major effort of will and a lot of expensive alcahol.

 

Despite which, I would gladly own a Deux Chevaux. In Black and Maroon, obviously.

 

 

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Anybody who has worked on Citroens has tried to forget them, but it requires a major effort of will and a lot of expensive alcahol. Despite which, I would gladly own a Deux Chevaux. In Black and Maroon, obviously.

Same applies to Fiats.

 

 

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Anybody who has worked on Citroens has tried to forget them, but it requires a major effort of will and a lot of expensive alcahol.

Owning an Alfa for many years while having a mechanical workshop, I worked on a few Euros for people, word gets around.

 

I have joyfully refused to not only work on a few CXs, but I even declined to work on an SM, as stunningly beautiful as it was.

 

I did not get as much joy though as saying no to V12 Jag owners 006_laugh.gif.0f7b82c13a0ec29502c5fb56c616f069.gif

 

 

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I had a Jag for a few years , it was called :Gareth,s Folly: 2 engines by other so called experts,1 engine rebuilt by me aaand then I put a small block chevy in, kept it for 1 more year then sold it to a bikie who rebuilt it as a concourse car, he spent 35k and only drove to shows, jags are not good cars

 

 

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Owning an Alfa for many years while having a mechanical workshop, I worked on a few Euros for people, word gets around.I have joyfully refused to not only work on a few CXs, but I even declined to work on an SM, as stunningly beautiful as it was.

 

I did not get as much joy though as saying no to V12 Jag owners 006_laugh.gif.0f7b82c13a0ec29502c5fb56c616f069.gif

I've worked on a number of different Cits; from DS19 to CX22.

 

Owned two Alfetta 1800s and a GTV2000 - not that bad to work on, though quirky. Bleeding the clutch slave cylinder was an exercise in frustration. And the Dellorto's were not as nice as the earlier Webers on the original GTV.

 

Also owned and worked on an XJ12L, the first model, with the four carbies. Fantastic tourer, though boiled from heat sink if you slowed below about 110k in anything over 30C ambient. Got as low as 5 MPG economy when giving it the wellie.. If you removed the exhaust tubes from the boot-mounted a/c unit and blocked off the exits into the saloon, you could run a boot-full of beer almost frozen...

 

 

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I had a Jag for a few years , it was called :Gareth,s Folly: 2 engines by other so called experts,1 engine rebuilt by me aaand then I put a small block chevy in, kept it for 1 more year then sold it to a bikie who rebuilt it as a concourse car, he spent 35k and only drove to shows, jags are not good cars

And you had to down-rate the front springs with the Chevy... it was about 150 lbs lighter (for a 327) than the Jag. 6

 

 

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Think It's one of the few flying.. 3 possible is it Vev?. 1980... That's only 37 years ago. The current engine (type) in it is probably the best of the period. Nev

Hi Nev,

 

I beleive there only 4 still flying in the world and this is one of them. The earlier 1928 models had the Curtiss OX5 engines but were considered under powered for the airframe, the 1929 had the Wright Whirlwind J-5-6 engine with 165hp. It feels like a time machine flying her around, no radio, only charts and a compass, can't see forward because of a huge pot in the middle of the screen which soon gets covered in grease from the rocker gear.

 

Cheers

 

Vev

 

 

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Anybody who has worked on Citroens has tried to forget them, but it requires a major effort of will and a lot of expensive alcahol. Despite which, I would gladly own a Deux Chevaux. In Black and Maroon, obviously.

I was in Greece in the early '70s, and there was a regular trickle of hardy souls 'on the road', hippies and kids making their way overland to see the world, round the Med into Africa, even across and into India. And the thing was to paint a map on the drivers door, with a line showing where you'd been. Some of those lines were astonishing. And the 3 cars they apeared on were:

Volkswagen

 

Land Rover

 

Citroen 2CV

 

Years later I loaned my (bigger) car for a weekend, and got the use of a 2CV in return. And it was absolutely delightful: more like sailing than driving, and we spent half the w/e giving rides to other friends and sharing the big cheesy smiles we couldn't keep off our faces.

 

Yes, I'd have one...)

 

 

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