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Phil Perry

Another Historical tale of Valour.

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Acting Flight Lieutenant William Reid VC (21st December 1921 – 28th November 2001), 61 Squadron, Bomber Command, RAF.

He was awarded the VC on 14th December 1943. The citation reads:

 

Air Ministry, 14th December, 1943.

 

The KING has been graciously pleased to confer the VICTORIA CROSS on the undermentioned officer in recognition of most conspicuous bravery:

 

Acting Flight Lieutenant William REID (124438), Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, No. 61 Squadron.

On the night of November 3rd, 1943, Flight Lieutenant Reid was pilot and captain of a Lancaster aircraft detailed to attack Dusseldorf.

 

Shortly after crossing the Dutch coast, the pilot's windscreen was shattered by fire from a Messerschmitt 110. Owing to a failure in the heating circuit, the rear gunner's hands were too cold for him to open fire immediately or to operate his microphone and so give warning of danger; but after a brief delay he managed to return the Messerschmitt's fire and it was driven off.

During the fight with the Messerschmitt, Flight Lieutenant Reid was wounded in the head, shoulders and hands. The elevator trimming tabs of the aircraft were damaged and it became difficult to control. The rear turret, too, was badly damaged and the communications system and compasses were put out of action. Flight Lieutenant Reid ascertained that his crew were unscathed and, saying nothing about his own injuries, he continued his mission.

 

Soon afterwards, the Lancaster was attacked by a Focke-Wulf 190. This time, the enemy's fire raked the bomber from stem to stern. The rear gunner replied with his only serviceable gun but the state of his turret made accurate aiming impossible. The navigator was killed and the wireless operator fatally injured. The mid-upper turret was hit and the oxygen system put out of action. Flight Lieutenant Reid was again wounded and the flight engineer, though hit in the forearm, supplied him with oxygen from a portable supply.

 

Flight Lieutenant Reid refused to be turned from his objective and Dusseldorf was reached some 50 minutes later. He had memorised his course to the target and had continued in such a normal manner that the bomb-aimer, who was cut off by the failure of the communications system, knew nothing of his captain's injuries or of the casualties to his comrades. Photographs show that, when the bombs were released, the aircraft was right over the centre of the target.

 

Steering by the pole star and the moon, Flight Lieutenant Reid then set course for home. He was growing weak from loss of blood. The emergency oxygen supply had given out. With the windscreen shattered, the cold was intense. He lapsed into semiconsciousness. The flight engineer, with some help from the bomb-aimer, kept the Lancaster in the air despite heavy anti-aircraft fire over the Dutch coast.

 

The North Sea crossing was accomplished. An airfield was sighted. The captain revived, resumed control and made ready to land. Ground mist partially obscured the runway lights. The captain was also much bothered by blood from his head wound getting into his eyes. But he made a safe landing although one leg of the damaged undercarriage collapsed when the load came on.

 

Wounded in two attacks, without oxygen, suffering severely from cold, his navigator dead, his wireless operator fatally wounded, his aircraft crippled and defenceless, Flight Lieutenant Reid showed superb courage and leadership in penetrating a further 200 miles into enemy territory to attack one of the most strongly defended targets in Germany, every additional mile increasing the hazards of the long and perilous journey home. His tenacity and devotion to duty were beyond praise.

 

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There were so many of them. . .and so Young.

 

It is quite possible that there were Many similar acts of heroism in that war, but we only get to hear about them if there's someone left alive to tell the story. . . . .

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I,m sure your right about that Phil in all theaters as well, My brother has just returned from a Mediterranean holliday and sent a photo of a plaque monument from Crete dedicated to the troops that defended against the paratroopers that invaded it. In one particular battle a maroi trooper stood up from their prepaired defensive positions on sighting the enemy advancing and gave them a full hakka inspiring the aussie and kiwis defenders to leave their positions and charge on mass driving the enemy back. I recon their all bloody heros myself eh. I will try and post the emai photo of the plaque if i can, having never posted an email pic befor, cheers Phil Mick

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I,m sure your right about that Phil in all theaters as well, My brother has just returned from a Mediterranean holliday and sent a photo of a plaque monument from Crete dedicated to the troops that defended against the paratroopers that invaded it. In one particular battle a maroi trooper stood up from their prepaired defensive positions on sighting the enemy advancing and gave them a full hakka inspiring the aussie and kiwis defenders to leave their positions and charge on mass driving the enemy back. I recon their all bloody heros myself eh. I will try and post the emai photo of the plaque if i can, having never posted an email pic befor, cheers Phil Mick

 

I'd Like that Mick, it sounds like a very interesting story. Look forward to seeing that pic if you can sort it somehow. . . . .Phil.

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G,day again Phil iv,e had a play trying to transfer and post that photo with no success, so an easier way would be to flick me an email to eal07605@westnet.com.au and i,ll just fwd the whole email back to you if you like sir cheers Mick

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