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Jerry_Atrick

Proposed Wing Spar AD for PA28 and PA32 aircraft

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OK, I admit it.. I like - even love permit (RAA) aircraft types. However, I have remained a CoA/Cat A pilot - I like the robust build and how they are in the main forgiving of some pretty solid landings that I sometimes fall prey to. Although having flown a decent variety of these types, I have liked the Piper low wing models as the airframe has the feel of a solidly built, rugged machine (Grumman has a more solid feel; Beech about the same). Although I have flung C150 and 152 aerobats over the skies in the YMMB and YCEM training areas, for some reason, Pipers just felt more solid. And, on the 5th of next month, I have a Single Engine Piston renewal (BFR or whatever it is called now) booked in a PA28 Warrior III, resplendent with its 8.33mhz spaced transceiver, various push buttons over the old rockers and a chunky yoke to boot. 

 

But, I am now questioning the wisdom of my decision: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/12/21/2018-27577/airworthiness-directives-piper-aircraft-inc-airplanes. An AD looks like coming alive to check on spars of the venerable PA28s (and PA32s) with what in effect will be over 5,000 hours (I think - I will re-read), lest one of the wing folds up at some stage. 

 

So much for the impression of robustness (said somewhat tongue in cheek - as these a/c get a lot of abuse).

 

Edited by Jerry_Atrick

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The formula in the AD means that only aircraft with many thousands of hours and used for training are likely to need inspection. My 6000 hr privately used PA28 will not need it.

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What a beautiful piece of easily comprehended writing that proposed AD is. And don't you love the inclusion of estimated costs for the various stages of the job? ($US85 = $AU120 today).

 

I bet if CASA wrote up this AD it would sound something like this: 

 

  • Funny 1

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What I do not get is that a daily inspection involves grabbing the wing tip and checking for any movement ... no way that level of movement in the video built up in one day so either people didn’t know movement was wrong or they just didn’t check.  

  • Agree 1

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3 hours ago, pmccarthy said:

That video is really scary.

The leading edge attachment bolt would have to be removed to allow that movement. Had a look thru ATSB reports for the pa28 in Australia, zero? Structural failures in over 50 years of service, many hours flown by ham fisted students. I would rather fly in a 10,000 hour pa28 (I have) than some RAA types.  

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