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CASA February 2019 regulatory wrap-up

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Have you missed the following updates published on our website last month?

Announcements

Community service flights

New requirements for pilots flying Community Service Flights will come into effect on 19 March 2019. The requirements establish a new minimum standard to ensure that the people that use these flights are afforded an appropriate level of safety. Visit the CASA website for more information.

Aerodrome regulation made into law

A comprehensive revision to CASR Part 139 was made on 21 February 2019, with the accompanying Manual of Standards due to be made shortly. The regulation does not commence until August 2020, allowing for CASA to provide support to the aviation community to fully transition by August 2022.

New booklet explains recommended radio procedures

We’ve published a new booklet called Be heard, be seen, be safe, to ensure all pilots and flight instructors understand the correct radio procedures to use in Class G airspace, including non-controlled aerodromes. It is available on the Online CASA Store.

New edition of Human factors for pilots kit now available

The 2nd edition of safety behaviors: Human factors for pilots updates both the content and format of the first edition, with 10 booklets, a workbook and videos. The kit, launched at Avalon, is available for ordering through our Online Store, or you can download a copy and watch the videos on the CASA website.

Consultations

Proposed amendments to CAOs 40.7 and 82.7

We are seeking feedback on proposed amendments to CAOs 40.7 and 82.7. The amendments propose new commercial pilot experience and training requirements for the balloon size classes, and the experience requirements for a chief pilot of an AOC holder.

Don’t miss the opportunity to make your comments count, provide your feedback via our Consultation Hub by the 13 March 2019 deadline.

Modernising the fatigue rules

Consultation on the proposed CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019 has closed. The summary of consultation – summarising the feedback received – will be published next month. However, you can read the responses to our consultation where permission has been granted to publish.

Exemptions

Changes to use of pre-hiring drug and alcohol tests

An exemption (CASA EX 42/16) that allows the use of pre-hiring drug and alcohol tests has expired and been replaced with a new exemption – CASA EX29/19.

To find out more, visit the CASA website.

Guidance material

CAAP 166-01v4.2 – Operations in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes

The policy in relation to the appropriate frequency to use in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes has been finalised and is now reflected in CAAP 166-01 v4.2.

View the CAAP on the CASA website.

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On ‎3‎/‎5‎/‎2019 at 12:09 PM, Admin said:

CAAP 166-01v4.2 – Operations in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes

The policy in relation to the appropriate frequency to use in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes has been finalised and is now reflected in CAAP 166-01 v4.2.

View the CAAP on the CASA website.

 

Actually, Admin didn't say this - they simply posted it for our information.

 

This CAAP has got to constitute 37 pages of the most contradictory 'advice' one will ever read.  I ask you - 37 pages to tell us how to suck eggs?   The 'need' for this publication lies solely with the regulators meddling with frequencies for lower airspace when the industry was managing it.

 

More on this under the thread 126.7

 

happy days,

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On 3/9/2019 at 4:46 PM, poteroo said:

 

Actually, Admin didn't say this - they simply posted it for our information.

 

This CAAP has got to constitute 37 pages of the most contradictory 'advice' one will ever read.  I ask you - 37 pages to tell us how to suck eggs?   The 'need' for this publication lies solely with the regulators meddling with frequencies for lower airspace when the industry was managing it.

It  would help a lot more if they explained WHY they made the changes. Aside from a rump of people who will never conform to any regulation, there are trouble spots from time to time in some local areas or with certain groups. 

 

One that comes to mind was a certain high volume training operation. One weekend four female students decided to hit the highlights of Sydney.

They landed the 172 in a paddock which happened to be owned by a pilot, and he quickly arrived at the scene to see if he could help. The women said they were fine; they'd just dropped in to find out where they were and could he tell them which way Sydney was. They had no maps, no gps....just winging it.  "You're not going anywhere" the farmer said "apart from all the regulations you've broken, you've just driven through one of my fences and wrapped half of it around the landing gear!" This conversation took considerably longer than that due to language difficulties, and the women tune on him, started up and flew off.

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