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I've never liked hybrid vehicles. They just seem to carry the worst of both systems....

I would much prefer pure battery with a dedicated "range extender" engine...

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Posted (edited)

I've never liked hybrid vehicles. They just seem to carry the worst of both systems....

I would much prefer pure battery with a dedicated "range extender" engine...

 

My son who lives in NZ owns a BMWI3 with range extender. On our last visit, he lent it to us for 2 weeks and we absolutely loved driving it. The price of petrol in NZ is much higher than here but he charges his EV overnight on off-peak for around $1 per 100km.

 

I like hybrid vehicles as a stop gap to full electric vehicles when the tech allows it

 

 

I would suggest that the tech does allow it. A top of the line Tesla 3 has a range of over 500km but I guess at a price that is more than many people are willing to pay. I was impressed with the BMWI3 in terms of just how much better it is to drive than an IC engine.

 

Hybrid Cessna 337

 

Hybrid-Electric Cessna 337 Takes Maiden Flight - Avionics

Edited by Guest
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yes but you dont get that range with a trailer or caravan on the back. Its horses for courses...my opinion is the battery tech is still not where it needs to be for vehicles that are not just used for daily transport going from A to B....I know my Sportage would be crap as a electric vehicle as I tow a trailer loaded up to a max of 750kg total 300km up to my farm and 300 back every 4 weeks or so.Not to mention maybe once or twice doing stuff around here on weekends as well...so for me still not practical. Then again not a lot of hybrids either for that market but I think that will come...oh and by the way dont think I want to pay 100k plus for a runabout to do the shopping at Coles or Woolies

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I just had to hire a truck to get 3.5 ton of flooring we got for the house we are building at the farm....I would have loved some sort of hybrid for that. It was a Isuzu 4ton trayback...I did around 900km this past weekend. Cost me $507 for the truck hire for 3 days...$208 for the more than 100km per day rate plus $220 for the fuel...it would have bee nice to have a hybrid to offset some of that cost as there is NO full electric either currently that could do it

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yes but you dont get that range with a trailer or caravan on the back. Its horses for courses...my opinion is the battery tech is still not where it needs to be for vehicles that are not just used for daily transport going from A to B....I know my Sportage would be crap as a electric vehicle as I tow a trailer loaded up to a max of 750kg total 300km up to my farm and 300 back every 4 weeks or so.Not to mention maybe once or twice doing stuff around here on weekends as well...so for me still not practical. Then again not a lot of hybrids either for that market but I think that will come...oh and by the way dont think I want to pay 100k plus for a runabout to do the shopping at Coles or Woolies

 

 

No argument there. It is already the case that vehicles are designed for certain uses. For my driving, I own a ford focus which also will not do the things you suggest. My son is actually quite a petrol head and owns 5 or 6 cars (the number seems to fluctuate wildly) He owns a couple of motorsport cars and also some kind of Landcruiser type vehicle which is used to tow a trailer to transport motorsports cars. With petrol in Wellington being well over $2 a litre it would be ridiculous to drive the 4wde to work every day. Many people own more than one car and generally these cars fit different usage patterns.

By the way you can tow with a Tesla but I think at this stage it would not be the best choice due to reducing the range.

 

Tesla Model X 2019 review: Long Range tow test

 

Really it is about analysing what you need your car to do. My car is useless as a towing vehicle as are many other vehicles but they suit the purpose. Most cars are for the daily drive.

 

I imagine a hybrid would be of more use to you at this stage. :smile:

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Posted (edited)

I would imagine going extra distances is where the "range extender" comes in to play.

Daily driving and charging overnight, the extender is never used.

However, needing extra range, the extender can be fired up using petrol, diesel, gas or whatever to replace some of the charge being used...

Like octave, I think the technology is here now but probably the acceptance is not.

https://www.mahle-powertrain.com/en/experience/mahle-compact-range-extender-engine/

Edited by Guest

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I would have if I could have. It was hard enough trying to get any truck here as most of all the companies that hire trucks had them out on long term hire. Budget were the only ones that had a flat top available so beggars cant be choosers. I couldnt use a pantek as the sheets were in packs of 30 and 1.65 ton each so had to be forked on and had to be loaded from each side of the truck. We had to hand unload and stack 61 sheets at 58kg each...Me and the Mrs had a real work out...slept well that night

 

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I would have if I could have. It was hard enough trying to get any truck here as most of all the companies that hire trucks had them out on long term hire. Budget were the only ones that had a flat top available so beggars cant be choosers. I couldnt use a pantek as the sheets were in packs of 30 and 1.65 ton each so had to be forked on and had to be loaded from each side of the truck. We had to hand unload and stack 61 sheets at 58kg each...Me and the Mrs had a real work out...slept well that night

 

[ATTACH type=full" alt="58208525897__80F2A7D7-F1BD-4135-9226-8646441A7876.jpg]43707[/ATTACH][ATTACH type=full" alt="62603660_2203964533005290_4251657893759156224_n (2).jpg]43709[/ATTACH][ATTACH type=full" alt="62432908_2203964683005275_5646578617694552064_n.jpg]43708[/ATTACH][ATTACH type=full" alt="64239764_2203964713005272_7991919353048072192_n (1).jpg]43710[/ATTACH]

How'd you get it OFF the truck... Couple of mates like this?

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Ummm can't attach pics from this tablet it seems... It was Hafthor Bjornsson (the Mountain)

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no Marty

 

just me and the Mrs unloaded every single sheet and restacked each one.....surprisingly it didnt take that long but both of us were cripples in the morning :)

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Have had 4 prius hybrids over last 10 yrs. Never had a problem with any of them and the current one has 240K on clock. Perfect combination of battery and ICE for Aus. I drive Melb to Gold Coast 4 times a year, 110 k/h most of the way @ 4.8 L / 100k. Cant tow with the prius but the new AWD Rav 4 can and gets 4.8 L / 100k. Nice vehicle too. My sister has a Tesler and just gets from Melb to Albury before needing a charge. The super charger only charges to 80% (to save battery) so another charge at Euroa to get back home. Australia is perfect for hybrids because of the distances travelled if you want more than a 50K commute vehicle. Same with electric aircraft, good for circuit training or specific duties, not as long distance commuters.

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Posted (edited)

Currently having an argument about the new Hybrid RAV4's towing ability on another forum. The spec sheet claims 480kg towing ability for the 2WD Hybrid, and 750kg unbraked trailer and 1500kg braked trailer for the AWD.

But another forum user stated the Hybrid is not capable of towing anything, and the Toyota salesman stated outright to him, that it was a waste of time trying to tow anything with the Hybrid, as it wasn't capable enough.

 

As a result, the forum user purchased a conventional drive RAV4, because he has a need to do some towing. He also stated that Toyota will not supply a towbar for the Hybrid, a claim that I find, a little far-fetched.

I suspect the salesman was trying to steer him away from the RAV4 Hybrid, because demand for the Hybrid has far exceeded Toyota projections.

The factory calculated sales of the Hybrid were going to be 40% of the model range, but it's actually at around 65% on order from the range, and Toyota are stunned by the Hybrid demand, and are having to rejig production levels on the models.

Edited by onetrack
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Posted (edited)

Local dealer here is towing a boat around to demonstrate the towing ability of the hybrid. The prius cannot tow and you cannot fit a towbar to it. The best they allow is a bike rack. Toyota web site shows towbar as option for the rav4

Edited by Mewp

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profit margins in IC cars are higher than EVs, as well as the servicing revenues, that's the main reason you don't see more. IC technology is mature and is effectively ended

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Currently having an argument about the new Hybrid RAV4's towing ability on another forum. The spec sheet claims 480kg towing ability for the 2WD Hybrid, and 750kg unbraked trailer and 1500kg braked trailer for the AWD.

But another forum user stated the Hybrid is not capable of towing anything, and the Toyota salesman stated outright to him, that it was a waste of time trying to tow anything with the Hybrid, as it wasn't capable enough.

 

As a result, the forum user purchased a conventional drive RAV4, because he has a need to do some towing. He also stated that Toyota will not supply a towbar for the Hybrid, a claim that I find, a little far-fetched.

I suspect the salesman was trying to steer him away from the RAV4 Hybrid, because demand for the Hybrid has far exceeded Toyota projections.

The factory calculated sales of the Hybrid were going to be 40% of the model range, but it's actually at around 65% on order from the range, and Toyota are stunned by the Hybrid demand, and are having to rejig production levels on the models.

Just looked at the sec sheet for the curent RAV4

All versions have a towing capacity of 750 kg without trailer brakes or 1500 kg with trailer brakes.

That's the maximum MASS it can tow, so think tradie's trailer with low profile load.

The Gross Vehicle Mass is 2230 kg, less the Kerb Mass of 1705, gives a vertical load of 525 kg including the driver, full fuel, and any tow bar down force.

Gross Combination mass is not specified so you can't tell whether the vrtical load has to be reduced to get maximum trailer mass.

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My wife just bought a new hybrid Corolla. Only $1500 more than the conventional model. I think it is great value.

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The Chinese electric vehicle giant BYD, backed by Warren Buffett, is to offer its all-electric trucks to the Australian market in a partnership with Macquarie Group, and expects they will achieve competitive lifetime costs with those of the current fleet of diesel trucks.

In one of the most significant developments in the Australian EV market, two models of BYD electric trucks will be offered to the Australian market; the T5 and T6 models. Each of the models has a range of 300km on a single charge, and will be targeted towards the small to medium logistics companies in Australia.

The trucks will provide a comparable loading capacity to those of diesel trucks, and Adelaide firm Nexport, which will be the local distributor, sees very little, if any impact on the day-to-day operations of existing truck operators following a shift to the electric trucks.

 

In fact, BYD hopes to help generate significant reductions in ongoing operating costs for businesses.

While the trucks will have a higher upfront costs, the fuel savings are expected to be considerable. Nexport estimates that operators could achieve “like-for-like” savings of up to 40%, saving $6,000-$10,000 annually for trucks driving 50,000km a year.

By shifting to a fleet of all-electric vehicles, truck operators will have an opportunity to both reduce their ongoing running costs and to significantly reduce their environmental footprint, running vehicles with zero tailpipe emissions.

All-electric trucks will be offered with financing packages provided through Macquarie Group’s Corporate and Asset Finance. Purchasers will be able to acquire trucks through a leasing model, allowing trucking companies to offset the costs of the electric trucks with the significant savings achieved through avoided fuel costs.

The financing model helps to address the upfront cost barrier for electric trucks, which are more expensive upfront than their diesel equivalents, but provide significant reductions in ongoing costs.

The attractiveness for truck operators will be the opportunity to use fuel savings to offset the cost of the trucks and provide long-term savings.

“We are pleased to be working with BYD and Nexport to support the roll-out of BYD’s electric commercial vehicle line in Australia and New Zealand,” Macquarie Corporate and Asset finance’s Scott Simpson said.

 

 

“This is an exciting opportunity to work with a uniquely experienced team to deliver cost-effective and proven low-emission vehicle solutions to commercial vehicle operators in the region.

“We see increasing interest in fleet and rental solutions in a range of industries and markets where demand for LEV’s is growing, and look forward to working with BYD to explore this, not only in electric trucks, but also other significant EV markets, such as airports and logistics.”

The buses will be the first factory-built buses offered into the Australian market, and will be sold under the BYD brand.

Under the deal, Nexport will be responsible for local sales of the BYD trucks, and provide support for trucks sold across Australia and New Zealand.

Nexport recently announced that they would to offer electric passenger vehicles in the Australian market under the Evant brand and based on BYD models in a joint venture with Fusion Capital. Evant has plans to ramp up Australian-based manufacturing of the electric vehicles with the eventual aim of the full manufacture and assembly of vehicles in Australia.

Nexport hopes to extend its electric vehicle offerings to medium and large size trucks by early 2020, and to include rubbish collection and sea- and air-port suitable trucks in the near future.

alt=BYD Nexport MOU signinghttps://reneweconomy.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/BYD-Nexport-MOU-signing.jpg[/img]BYD, Nexport and Macquarie Corporate and Asset Finance representatives signing the deal at BYD’s Shenzhen headquarters. Credit: Supplied

BYD has supplied small orders of buses to various Australian governments, including two Cambridge branded all-electric buses to the ACT Government in 2017.

BYD has emerged as a major contender in the emerging global market for electric vehicles, posting sales numbers that have challenged Tesla for the top spot. BYD has invested heavily in its design team, luring former Audi Group chief designer Wolfgang Egger to work on its passenger vehicles.

Egger’s work culminated in the launch of six new BYD passenger vehicles earlier in the year, with models including sedans, and compact and mid-sized SUVs, and the family sized BYD Song Max van.

BYD has strongly invested in infrastructure to support the deployment of electric vehicles, including the deployment of wireless electric bus chargers in Indianapolis. The wireless charging inductors will deliver 300kW of charging capacity, allowing the US State’s a 33-strong electric bus fleet to operate on a 24/7 basis.

BYD has also invested in the direct production of battery systems, to supply both its electric vehicle production, but also as it targets the home battery storage market, establishing the world’s largest battery manufacturing facility in Western China’s Qinghai province, with plans to produce up to 24GWh of battery devices annually.

It is understood that BYD is also looking for a location for a potential new Australian headquarters, people familiar with the matter have said.

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