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Greetings All!

 

This trailer has taken 10 years of development and really is fantastic!

 

Features include:

  1. Winch for loading
  2. Detachable ramps which bolt in the middle of the trailer when transporting
  3. Detachable wing rack supports

Most pictures are self explanatory but let me know if you have any questions.

 

Ciao, John

 

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Hi All:

 

I thought I'd start a thread for ideas for trike trailers. I'm currently having one built and got ideas from several sources. I thought this would be a good place to share your ideas on what makes a good trike trailer.

 

I'll start with some of my ideas.

 

Fisrtly, weight. The lighter the trailer, the less fuel it takes to haul and the less tyre wear.

 

Secondly, I decided to have a full deck on the trailer and in keeping with the first goal, I decided to have an aluminium deck of the sort that they have on tray-back utilities.

 

Third, Wing racks. I chose to have the wing mounted on the trailer rather than the vehicle as it makes the trike transport self contained. If I take the trike on holiday and I want to go to the shops or out to eat, I don't want to be lugging the wing with me. Also, the added cost of racking on the trailer is less than and more asthetic than the racking on the vehicle. Finally, if the wing rack was on the vehicle, I'd probably leave it on even when I'm not trailering the trike and those things are pretty ugly on a vehicle.

 

Fourth, Tilt. I decided to go for a tilting trailer rather than ramps. The tilt doesn't add as much weight as carrying a set of ramps and is quicker and easier for getting the trike on and off the trailer.

 

Fifth, Winch. I decided to have a winch to get the trike on and off the trailer. Having the winch means not having to heave the trike on and off manually. Whenever you're heaving the trike around, there's the possibility of hurting someone or the trike.

 

Sixth, Wheels enclosed withing the deck perimeter. My brother-in-law says that he occasionally drags his trailer mudguards against things and suggested this solution. Also given that my trailer is 6 metres long and has a big turning circle, this is even more likely to happen.

 

Seventh, The trailer extends past the prop in the back. This might save a busted prop if I back into something.

 

Eighth, Stone deflector at the front. This is a simple and useful addition to protect my investment from rocks and stones thrown up by the towing vehicle.

 

Ninth, Open top. I decided not to go for an enclosed trailer for a couple of reasons; weight and ease of access. Also an enclosed trailer would require the wing to be carried much higher than I plan to carry it.

 

Tenth, Construction simplicity. The chassis design of my trailer is a very simple rectangular shape. The decking is just planks cut to length and bolted to the chassis. This helps to keep the cost and weight down.

 

Eleventh, Trike contained within trailer outlines. If I drag the trailer against something, I would prefer that the trailer cop the hit rather than the trike, so the trike sits completely within the boundaries of the trailer.

 

Here's some pics of my trailer chassis and the design model that I drew. I have this as a Solid Edge V19 file if anyone wants a copy, just PM me.

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Hi All:

 

I thought I'd start a thread for ideas for trike trailers. I'm currently having one built and got ideas from several sources. I thought this would be a good place to share your ideas on what makes a good trike trailer.

 

I'll start with some of my ideas.

 

Fisrtly, weight. The lighter the trailer, the less fuel it takes to haul and the less tyre wear.

 

Secondly, I decided to have a full deck on the trailer and in keeping with the first goal, I decided to have an aluminium deck of the sort that they have on tray-back utilities.

 

Third, Wing racks. I chose to have the wing mounted on the trailer rather than the vehicle as it makes the trike transport self contained. If I take the trike on holiday and I want to go to the shops or out to eat, I don't want to be lugging the wing with me. Also, the added cost of racking on the trailer is less than and more asthetic than the racking on the vehicle. Finally, if the wing rack was on the vehicle, I'd probably leave it on even when I'm not trailering the trike and those things are pretty ugly on a vehicle.

 

Fourth, Tilt. I decided to go for a tilting trailer rather than ramps. The tilt doesn't add as much weight as carrying a set of ramps and is quicker and easier for getting the trike on and off the trailer.

 

Fifth, Winch. I decided to have a winch to get the trike on and off the trailer. Having the winch means not having to heave the trike on and off manually. Whenever you're heaving the trike around, there's the possibility of hurting someone or the trike.

 

Sixth, Wheels enclosed withing the deck perimeter. My brother-in-law says that he occasionally drags his trailer mudguards against things and suggested this solution. Also given that my trailer is 6 metres long and has a big turning circle, this is even more likely to happen.

 

Seventh, The trailer extends past the prop in the back. This might save a busted prop if I back into something.

 

Eighth, Stone deflector at the front. This is a simple and useful addition to protect my investment from rocks and stones thrown up by the towing vehicle.

 

Ninth, Open top. I decided not to go for an enclosed trailer for a couple of reasons; weight and ease of access. Also an enclosed trailer would require the wing to be carried much higher than I plan to carry it.

 

Tenth, Construction simplicity. The chassis design of my trailer is a very simple rectangular shape. The decking is just planks cut to length and bolted to the chassis. This helps to keep the cost and weight down.

 

Eleventh, Trike contained within trailer outlines. If I drag the trailer against something, I would prefer that the trailer cop the hit rather than the trike, so the trike sits completely within the boundaries of the trailer.

 

Here's some pics of my trailer chassis and the design model that I drew. I have this as a Solid Edge V19 file if anyone wants a copy, just PM me.

Hi

Do you have the plans for your trailer at all?

Jeff

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Hi

Do you have the plans for your trailer at all?

Jeff

Jeff:

 

Yes, I do still have the plans, but I'm out of the country at the moment. I'll PM you when I get back.

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Jeff:

 

Yes, I do still have the plans, but I'm out of the country at the moment. I'll PM you when I get back.

Many thanks! look fwd to it.

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Hi All:

 

I thought I'd start a thread for ideas for trike trailers. I'm currently having one built and got ideas from several sources. I thought this would be a good place to share your ideas on what makes a good trike trailer.

 

I'll start with some of my ideas.

 

Fisrtly, weight. The lighter the trailer, the less fuel it takes to haul and the less tyre wear.

 

Secondly, I decided to have a full deck on the trailer and in keeping with the first goal, I decided to have an aluminium deck of the sort that they have on tray-back utilities.

 

Third, Wing racks. I chose to have the wing mounted on the trailer rather than the vehicle as it makes the trike transport self contained. If I take the trike on holiday and I want to go to the shops or out to eat, I don't want to be lugging the wing with me. Also, the added cost of racking on the trailer is less than and more asthetic than the racking on the vehicle. Finally, if the wing rack was on the vehicle, I'd probably leave it on even when I'm not trailering the trike and those things are pretty ugly on a vehicle.

 

Fourth, Tilt. I decided to go for a tilting trailer rather than ramps. The tilt doesn't add as much weight as carrying a set of ramps and is quicker and easier for getting the trike on and off the trailer.

 

Fifth, Winch. I decided to have a winch to get the trike on and off the trailer. Having the winch means not having to heave the trike on and off manually. Whenever you're heaving the trike around, there's the possibility of hurting someone or the trike.

 

Sixth, Wheels enclosed withing the deck perimeter. My brother-in-law says that he occasionally drags his trailer mudguards against things and suggested this solution. Also given that my trailer is 6 metres long and has a big turning circle, this is even more likely to happen.

 

Seventh, The trailer extends past the prop in the back. This might save a busted prop if I back into something.

 

Eighth, Stone deflector at the front. This is a simple and useful addition to protect my investment from rocks and stones thrown up by the towing vehicle.

 

Ninth, Open top. I decided not to go for an enclosed trailer for a couple of reasons; weight and ease of access. Also an enclosed trailer would require the wing to be carried much higher than I plan to carry it.

 

Tenth, Construction simplicity. The chassis design of my trailer is a very simple rectangular shape. The decking is just planks cut to length and bolted to the chassis. This helps to keep the cost and weight down.

 

Eleventh, Trike contained within trailer outlines. If I drag the trailer against something, I would prefer that the trailer cop the hit rather than the trike, so the trike sits completely within the boundaries of the trailer.

 

Here's some pics of my trailer chassis and the design model that I drew. I have this as a Solid Edge V19 file if anyone wants a copy, just PM me.

I like it

Glen:

 

Yes, well spotted about the red. Did you notice that my trike is red too? No one will be able to keep up with me in the air or on the ground ;)

 

I plan to carry the wing kind of nestled between the fins of the spats and the body of the aircraft and slightly angled towards the center going forward. I want to carry the wing as low as possible, but not on the deck of the trailer. This will get the wing behind the towing vehicle and keep the C of G a bit lower. Because my trailer is fairly light (< 350Kg all up) keeping the C of G low will be an issue as the motor of the trike sits pretty high above the axles of the trailer.

 

I do have travel covers for my trike, but a bit of extra protection never goes astray. Oh, I forgot to mention that the stone deflector will be a steel frame with some heavy square fence mesh welded in and covered with something like shadecloth for the least wind resistance.

 

And my towing vehicle will be a V6 Rav4 (when I get it), so no power probs for the tow.

 

An extra waterproof cover for the wing sounds like a good idea, and maybe some covers for the struts.

 

Thanks for the input

Good looking design Scott, and the longer draw bar will certainly improve the ease of reversing and it will travel better.. I built one many years ago , with similar ideas , except the tilt tray. I submerged if you will my front tyre track with in the tray , full length of trailer, which kept the tray as a flat bed , but an extra use as a motorbike trailer. And I have duel removeable wing racks , either side of trailer, tool boxes and Jerry can trays..

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Hi All:

 

I thought I'd start a thread for ideas for trike trailers. I'm currently having one built and got ideas from several sources. I thought this would be a good place to share your ideas on what makes a good trike trailer.

 

I'll start with some of my ideas.

 

Fisrtly, weight. The lighter the trailer, the less fuel it takes to haul and the less tyre wear.

 

Secondly, I decided to have a full deck on the trailer and in keeping with the first goal, I decided to have an aluminium deck of the sort that they have on tray-back utilities.

 

Third, Wing racks. I chose to have the wing mounted on the trailer rather than the vehicle as it makes the trike transport self contained. If I take the trike on holiday and I want to go to the shops or out to eat, I don't want to be lugging the wing with me. Also, the added cost of racking on the trailer is less than and more asthetic than the racking on the vehicle. Finally, if the wing rack was on the vehicle, I'd probably leave it on even when I'm not trailering the trike and those things are pretty ugly on a vehicle.

 

Fourth, Tilt. I decided to go for a tilting trailer rather than ramps. The tilt doesn't add as much weight as carrying a set of ramps and is quicker and easier for getting the trike on and off the trailer.

 

Fifth, Winch. I decided to have a winch to get the trike on and off the trailer. Having the winch means not having to heave the trike on and off manually. Whenever you're heaving the trike around, there's the possibility of hurting someone or the trike.

 

Sixth, Wheels enclosed withing the deck perimeter. My brother-in-law says that he occasionally drags his trailer mudguards against things and suggested this solution. Also given that my trailer is 6 metres long and has a big turning circle, this is even more likely to happen.

 

Seventh, The trailer extends past the prop in the back. This might save a busted prop if I back into something.

 

Eighth, Stone deflector at the front. This is a simple and useful addition to protect my investment from rocks and stones thrown up by the towing vehicle.

 

Ninth, Open top. I decided not to go for an enclosed trailer for a couple of reasons; weight and ease of access. Also an enclosed trailer would require the wing to be carried much higher than I plan to carry it.

 

Tenth, Construction simplicity. The chassis design of my trailer is a very simple rectangular shape. The decking is just planks cut to length and bolted to the chassis. This helps to keep the cost and weight down.

 

Eleventh, Trike contained within trailer outlines. If I drag the trailer against something, I would prefer that the trailer cop the hit rather than the trike, so the trike sits completely within the boundaries of the trailer.

 

Here's some pics of my trailer chassis and the design model that I drew. I have this as a Solid Edge V19 file if anyone wants a copy, just PM me.

I know this was sometime ago now Scott , and your probably onto your next trailer by now , but what was the cost of the Red Rocket mate ? Materials and labour seperate if you like , Scott . Thanks mate

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I know this was sometime ago now Scott , and your probably onto your next trailer by now , but what was the cost of the Red Rocket mate ? Materials and labour seperate if you like , Scott . Thanks mate

It wasn't cheap...that much I remember. I'll see if I can find the receipts.

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It wasn't cheap...that much I remember. I'll see if I can find the receipts.

Good onya thanks mate, just a ball park figure will do if you like ? Do you still have it ??

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Good onya thanks mate, just a ball park figure will do if you like ? Do you still have it ??

Just checked with the cheese n kisses... We think it was in the order of $4,500.

 

 

Told you it wasn't cheap! :-)

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Just checked with the cheese n kisses... We think it was in the order of $4,500.

 

 

Told you it wasn't cheap! :-)

No you weren't wrong Scott, and it wasn't a closed in trailer design. But I did like the design abc finished product , it must of been a breeze to tow and use ..

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No you weren't wrong Scott, and it wasn't a closed in trailer design. But I did like the design abc finished product , it must of been a breeze to tow and use ..

From memory, the decking was around $1800 and that was, what? 10 years ago??

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Here's the drawing I used to guide my trailer maker. The plans are not a cookbook solution and should be tailored to your trike. I've also included a pic of the wing rack setup. The positioning of the racks was done 'on-the'fly' having the trike on the trailer for positioning and setting the positions so that the wing didn't extend beyond the width of the trailer in the back, nor beyond the length of the prop extents. The plug on the back of the trailer with the wire connected to it, powers a second set of tail lights on a board that I hung on the prop for extra safety.

Edit: The stone guard on the front of the trailer is a necessity. If you look closely at the pics, you'll notice that the shadecloth screen doesn't go all the way to the bottom of the guard. I used to regularly find little pebbles on the deck of the trailer that no doubt would have hit the trike, without the guard.

P1070223.thumb.JPG.27b2d2691be9b42c0dfa2f09815cc3d5.JPG

Trike_Trailer_Dimensions.thumb.jpg.ee142e611621550805807c3176aad2ce.jpg

P1070227.thumb.JPG.0426077510b7062a6276da8148f1ea2a.JPG

Edited by Guest
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No you weren't wrong Scott, and it wasn't a closed in trailer design. But I did like the design abc finished product , it must of been a breeze to tow and use ..

Yes, it was very easy to tow, and very stable. Also with the long wheelbase it was easy to reverse.

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On 12/3/2009 at 3:55 AM, tassytriker said:

Hello

Have a look at these picts.I made a cradle and roller setup(using boat rollers) reasonably in expensive and quiet simple to build and a ten year old could put the trike on the trailer:clap:

Just lift the front up strap it in the cradle and winch it on!

Gary[ATTACH][ATTACH]9351.vB[/ATTACH][/ATTACH]

249265796_Picture1.thumb.jpg.a070af32c6d0f09cf2ac9a4878e4bc24.jpg

IMG_0004.thumb.JPG.0352cb175751b9c6eb7fb143d88ce305.JPG

This works Great I made a similar setup and its great for 1 man loading and not having to worry about the front wheel lifting.

 

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Looking through this thread I was very surprised that nobody has mentioned suspension (unless I've missed a posting). I would have included appropriate suspension right up there in the initial 'wish list' in post #1.

 

The problem with just buying standard self-build trailer components is that in general they are designed for carrying maximum rather than minimum weights -  typically 500 or 750 kg box trailers being the norm. 

 

But few trikes are going to weigh this much, even with spare wheels, tools, fuel, etc. Maybe half that weight. So with these 'off the shelf' suspension setups, the spring rate will be very stiff. This will transmit harsh vertical accelerations into the trike, which can easily damage the structure over time, and very quickly bugger the sensitive flight instruments like altimeter, ASI, etc.

 

If you are building a purpose built trailer from the ground up, I would suggest you design long travel, soft suspension. This is almost the exact opposite to the half elliptic carthorse spring setup on all the pics I've seen on this thread. You should also not aim to make the trailer itself too light. A very light trailer will skitter about over bumps, as it does not have the inertia to allow the platform to tend to remain steady & the wheels to move up & down. When I towed my MiniMax from NSW to Victoria, I ballasted my small converted box trailer with steel section to bring it up to maximum placarded weight for this reason. Ideally you'd use long coil springs, but failing that, remove one or more leaves off the half elliptic springs to reduce the spring rate.

 

If you have the option, the best wheels are the largest diameter you can fit, with fat tyres run at minimum pressure, again to provide energy absorption.

 

So in summary: long travel, soft suspension; large diameter soft tyres; ballasted trailer. Particularly if you plan on off roading or come across the dreaded corrugations found in more remote areas.

 

Bruce

 

 

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