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  • Gloster Meteor

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    Description

    The Gloster Meteor was the first British jet fighter and the Allies' only jet aircraft to achieve combat operations during the Second World War.

    General Information

    The Meteor's development was heavily reliant on its ground-breaking turbojet engines, pioneered by Sir Frank Whittle and his company, Power Jets Ltd. Development of the aircraft began in 1940, although work on the engines had been under way since 1936. The Meteor first flew in 1943 and commenced operations on 27 July 1944 with No. 616 Squadron RAF. The Meteor was not a sophisticated aircraft in its aerodynamics, but proved to be a successful combat fighter. Gloster's 1946 civil Meteor F.4 demonstrator G-AIDC was the first civilian-registered jet aircraft in the world.

     

    Meteors of the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) fought in the Korean War. Several other operators such as Argentina, Egypt and Israel flew Meteors in later regional conflicts. Specialised variants of the Meteor were developed for use in photographic aerial reconnaissance and as night fighters.

     

    For the full Meteor story, click here.

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    Specifications

    Seats:
    One
    Length:
    44 ft 7 in (13.59 m)
    Wingspan:
    37 ft 2 in (11.33 m)
    Height:
    13 ft 0 in (3.96 m)
    Wing Area:
    350 sq ft (33 m2)
    Empty Weight:
    10,684 lb (4,846 kg)
    MTOW:
    Gross weight: 15,700 lb (7,121 kg)
    Powerplant:
    2 × Rolls-Royce Derwent 8 centrifugal flow turbojet engine, 3,600 lbf (16 kN) thrust each
    Vne:
    Maximum speed: 600 mph (966 km/h; 521 kn) at 10,000 ft (3,000 m) Mach 0.82
    Range:
    600 mi (521 nmi; 966 km)
    Rate of Climb:
    7,000 ft/min (36 m/s)

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