Jump to content

Our Picks

Top content from across the community, hand-picked by us.

Australian Weather Lookup
All the general BOM weather both current and forecasts links in one page.
    • Like
  • 3 replies

CA-27 Sabre fighter jet restored
Nestled deep in a corner of an old packing shed in Dareton, New South Wales a special RAAF aircraft restoration project is taking shape.After two years of painstaking work, volunteers at the Dareton Men's Shed have unveiled the result of their efforts; revealing a magnificent, freshly painted 1954 RAAF CA-27 Sabre Fighter Jet.
    • Like
  • 1 reply

Think you can land a plane?
We ran through an “Airplane!” scenario with the aviation department at the University of North Dakota. Less than a minute into a flight to Omaha, alarms started blaring. From the cockpit, the pilot uttered one worrisome word: “Yikes.” He gripped the side stick, unwittingly disengaging the autopilot, and the plane shot into the clouds. It was a dangerous maneuver for any flight crew member, especially one without any experience.
    • Like
  • 2 replies

eVTOL industry prepares
As the famous saying goes, you only get one chance to make a first impression. By the end of 2023, ultralight eVTOLs like the Lift Hexa and Ryse Recon will be in the air, and with that, eVTOLs will be introduced in the U.S. for the first time in history. This first impression will resonate for years to come and hopefully, only in positive ways. Ultralight eVTOL developers like Ryse Aero believe this aircraft type will allow the industry to “crawl, walk, and then run,” helping to familiarize the public with this novel aircraft.
    • Like
  • 18 replies

E6B
Our ONLINE E6B flight computer, nicknamed the "whiz wheel" or "prayer wheel", is a form of circular slide rule used in aviation and one of the very few analog calculating devices in widespread use in the 21st century.E6B flight computers are used during flight planning (on the ground before takeoff) to aid in calculating fuel burn, wind correction, time en route, and other items. The following tools replicate the functions of an E6B.
  • 7 replies

Tiger Moth museum will draw new generation of enthusiasts
Tucked away inside a small north Queensland hangar are two planes that belong to a bygone era, flown by men with a deep appreciation of the past. With their bright retro colours and open cockpits, the World War II-era Tiger Moth biplanes almost look out of place in modern-day Mackay. They have been kept in pristine condition by the sons of Fred Christiansen, who once used them to ready fighter pilots for combat. Before and after the war, Mr Christensen worked in the sugar cane industry around Mackay, and he eventually settled in the "sugar city". He also passed on his love of flying to his two sons. One of them, Greg Christensen, 69, a founder of the Mackay Tiger Moth Museum and himself a pilot
    • Like
  • 0 replies

JABIRU J-432 TWIN
Len and Les Alford of Jabiru Aircraft Southern Africa are the South African dealers for Jabiru. They approached Jabiru in 2012 suggesting there was a market for a twin engine Jabiru in Africa. They explained that parts of Africa are best flown over at a great heights, and the prevalence of wild animals and AK47s tends to make flyers nervous about outfield landings.  The conclusion…two engines would be nice. The project was always intended to be a joint development and aimed at the South African market.
    • Like
  • 3 replies

LSA or Legacy? Costs Compared
When the light sport aircraft idea first broke ground 20 years ago, the idea was a new class of airplanes bridging between so-called “fat ultralights” and standard-category airplanes whose inflated prices made them unaffordable save for the wealthy few. Two decades later, has the experiment paid off? Yes, but with some qualifications. Light sport airplanes were supposed to be simpler to build and certify— they are—and although the original design brief didn’t specifically say so, it was assumed they would be cheaper to buy. They are that, too. But only relative to new, standard-category airplanes and not compared to any of dozens of legacy two- and four-place airframes with similar or greater capability.
  • 0 replies

What Are Pitot Tubes And How Do They Work?
Pitot tubes are crucial components onboard aircraft used to measure a range of important data. The tubes are popularly known as speedometers, giving pilots a gauge on their airspeed, and also measure altitude and altitude trend. Pitot tubes are usually found along the front fuselage or along the wing of an aircraft. What exactly are pitot tubes? Pitot tubes aren’t just inventions innovated for aviation; they’re also commonly found in industrial machinery, boats and even Formula 1 cars. A pitot tube is essentially a flow sensor instrument. Simple pitot tubes have one hole at the front; however, planes will often use pitot-static tubes with two openings rather than separate pitot tubes and static ports.
  • 8 replies

×
×
  • Create New...