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Biographies

Books relating to the biographies of those in Aviation


14 books

  1. Australian Aviator

    By Norman Brearley & Ted Mayman

    From WWI pilot to founding Australia's first commercial airline, WA Airways, carrying mail and passengers, searching for Kingsford-Smith and Ulm, looking for Lasseter's Lost Reef to joining the RAAF in WWII.

    • Published on 1971
    • 204 pages

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  2. Bert Hinkler

    By Grantlee Kieza

    A man whose life was filled with secrets, including two wives on two continents at the same time. Bert Hinkler lived a life of soaring highs and turbulent lows, a restless, adventure-filled existence as one of the Lords of Distance in the golden age of flight.

    • Published on 2012
    • 473 pages

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  3. Charles Kingsford Smith and Those Magnificent Men

    By Peter FitzSimons

    Sir Charles Kingsford Smith is one of Australia's most loved heroes. In an action-packed life, the indomitable 'Smithy' went from fighting as a soldier among the carnage of Gallipoli and the Western Front, to taking to the skies against the likes of the Red Baron - for which he won the Military Cross for gallantry - before becoming the greatest peacetime aviator of his generation. Along with Charles Ulm, he was the first man to conquer the Pacific by air, the first to fly across the Tasman Sea,

    • Published on 2009
    • 679 pages

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  4. Fate is the Hunter

    By Ernest K. Gann

    Ernest K. Gann’s classic memoir is an up-close and thrilling account of the treacherous early days of commercial aviation. In his inimitable style, Gann brings you right into the cockpit, recounting both the triumphs and terrors of pilots who flew when flying was anything but routine.

    • Published on 1986
    • 390 pages

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  5. High Life of Oswald Watt

    By Chris Clark

    'Father of the Flying Corps' and 'Father of Australian Aviation' were two of the unofficial titles conferred on Oswald ("Toby") Watt when he died in tragic circumstances shortly after the end of the First World War. He had become the Australian Army's first qualified pilot in 1911, but spent the first 18 months of the war with the French Air ......

    • Published on 2016
    • 352 pages

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  6. I Flew for the Führer

    By Heinz Knoke

    "Heinz Knoke was one of the outstanding German fighter pilots of the Second World War and this vivid record of his experiences has become a classic among aviation memoirs. He joined the Luftwaffe on the outbreak of war, eventually becoming commanding officer of a fighter wing. An outstandingly brave and skilful fighter, he logged over two thousand flights, four hundred operational missions and was officially credited with thirty-three combat wins. He was awarded the Knight's Cross for his achiev

    • Published on 2003
    • 187 pages

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  7. Lawrence James Wackett Aircraft Pioneer

    By Lawrence James Wackett

    Autobiography - WWI pilot, aircraft designer (including the Wackett Trainer) - the Commonwealth Aircraft Corporation at Fishermen's Bend grew under Wackett's direction to reach a peak employment of 10,000 during the war.

    • Published on 1972
    • 241 pages

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  8. Lindbergh

    By A. Scott Berg

    Biography of Charles A. Lindbergh (1902-1974), An aviation record breaker, idolised by Americans, his personal life was as challenging as his flying, from the kidnapping of his child, to his support for the Nazis during WWII, to his death from cancer.

    • Published on 1998
    • 628 pages

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  9. My God! It's a Woman

    By Nancy Bird and Nancy Bird Walton

    Foreword by Gaby Kennard.  The autobiography of Nancy Bird who obtained her commercial pilot's licence at 19, barnstormed with other pilots, flew the Outback, travelled to Europe and American and founded the Australian Women Pilots' Association.

    • Published on 1990
    • 216 pages

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  10. Sidney Cotton

    By Jeffrey Watson

    Sidney Cotton was a pilot, a businessman who was decidedly shady - and a spy. He was born in western Queensland in 1896, and even as a boy designed cars and planes. He served in the RAF in the latter part of World War I. He later went into business in the UK (aviation and photography) - and always operated very close to the edge. Various businesses went broke under him - but he always walked away. There were also suggestions that he was involved in society blackmail in London the 1930s. matters,

    • Published on 2002
    • 262 pages

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  11. The Flying Nun

    By Anne Maree Jensen and Jeanne Ryckmans

    Sister Anne Maree Jensen's baseball cap, riding boots and a Cessna aeroplane are not usually part of the image that comes to mind when we think of nuns - but then, Sister Anne Maree Jensen's 'Aerial Ministry' is not a conventional calling either. For the past ten years, Sister Anne Maree has been flying over some of the most remote parts of outback southwest Queensland, bringing companionship to the women who live in her bush parish.  Her parish includes more than 250,000 square kilometres of sh

    • Published on 1999
    • 248 pages

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  12. The Man Who Saved Smithy

    By Rick Searle

    Patrick Gordon 'Bill' Taylor was a pioneer of Australian aviation. As a fighter pilot during the First World War, he was awarded the Military Cross and discovered a life-long passion for flight and air navigation. Returning to Australia after the war, he became a close friend of Charles Kingsford Smith; they went on to form an incredible flying partnership, setting records around the globe. It was on a flight across the Tasman in Smithy's famous Southern Cross that Taylor earned the Empire's hig

    • Published on 2015
    • 400 pages

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  13. The Sound of Wings

    By Mary S Lovell

    When she disappeared in 1937 over a shark-infested sea, Amelia Earhart had lived up to her wish - internationally famous, a daring and pioneering aviator, and ambassador extraordinary for the United States.  Married to a man with a genius for publicity, her life was crowded, demanding and adventurous.

    • Published on 1989
    • 435 pages

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  14. True North

    By Brenda Niall

    Growing up in suburban Perth in the 1920s, the two Durack girls were fascinated by tales of the pioneering past of their father and grandfather overlanding from Queensland in the 1880s and setting up four vast cattle stations in the remote north. A year spent together on the stations in their early twenties ignited in the sisters a lifelong love of the Kimberley, along with a growing unease about the situation of the Aboriginal people employed there. Through war, love affairs, children and event

    • Published on 2012
    • 291 pages

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