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Roundsounds

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Roundsounds last won the day on October 7 2018

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About Roundsounds

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  • Birthday 12/25/1961

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    NSW
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    Australia

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  1. Roundsounds

    Guess This Aircraft ?

    You got the Luton Major!! The one in the foreground is a Stitts Payboy. I watched both of these aircraft during finally assembly at Camden when I was a young hangar rat. Managed to go for a ride in both, later in life I did a flight review for one of the Luton’s owners and had a fly of it - very Tiger Moth like to fly.
  2. Roundsounds

    Guess This Aircraft ?

    I sat in the backseat on a number of flights in the Horizon when I was a young lad, the gear and flap were operated by a single handle. Gear and flap were wound either up or down, you could not separate their operation. If you ever see one departing you can tell when the pilot has started retracting the gear by the pitching/rolling induced by the pilot while he winds the gear/flap up.
  3. Roundsounds

    Guess This Aircraft ?

    Bonus points if you can name the orange and white aircraft in the background too.
  4. https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/4930550/199805459.pdf
  5. There have been a number of Tigers suffer engine failures as the result of the prorective coating on the cork float in the carburettor cracking. The crack allows fuel to enter the cork, as the engine warms it causes the coating to expand and can make the float stick and lead to a rich or lean situation. Very hard to identify if the aircraft has caught fire. There is a well documented accident in Qld explaining this fault, It would be very easy to attribute this type of failure to carb ice. ATSB report.
  6. There have been a number of Tigers suffer engine failures as the result of the prorective coating on the cork float in the carburettor cracking. The crack allows fuel to enter the cork, as the engine warms it causes the coating to expand and can make the float stick and lead to a rich or lean situation. Very hard to identify if the aircraft has caught fire. There is a well documented accident in WA explaining this fault, I’ll try to find the report. It would be very easy to attribute this type of failure to carb ice. The WA accident report says it is a know fault observed by people performing overhauls, yet no AD issued. I will not fly Tigers any longer as a result, the last endorsement I knocked back had an unexplained engine failure on takeoff resulting in an off field landing and damage.
  7. Roundsounds

    Avoiding the Base-to-Final Stall/Spin

    This is actually a very poor video for the following reasons: - he introduces the PARE spin recovery technique before commencing the demos, but never mentions the A (aileron) during any of the recoveries. If you enter a spin and not centre the ailerons you will likely not recover (aircraft type dependent). - he continually refers to airspeed being the primary factor in stalling - it’s angle of attack, you can stall / spin from any airspeed. - he introduces a non standard method of using roll to identify which rudder to apply during spin recovery. This will kill you if you try this method with inverted spinning. The only way to reliably identify the direction of rotation is yaw, best way is to sight down the nose of the aircraft. I agree that looking at the balance ball is unrealistic unless in IMC. - he never mentions removing the opposite rudder when the spin rotation stops. Leaving full rudder in will cause some aircraft to spin in the opposite direction, some will flick into an inverted spin if you also hold the forward stick in too. The Yak 52 being a great example. If you’re going to produce a training video on a topic it must be done correctly. In this case give the full recovery method and apply all steps through to established back in the climb. It is very difficult to retrain people who have been taught incorrect techniques, teach the correct ones from the outset. In summary; - it’s angle of attack not airspeed leading to stall / spins. - Use all steps of an acceptable procedure every time, especially when instructing. - don’t try to make up your own recovery tips without thinking them through and doing some research. (Using roll to identify which rudder to use) On the positive side, I agree with his scenario based entry method by simulating an overshoot onto final.
  8. Roundsounds

    Pre Solo Air Law Exam

    Ask your instructor to provide you with a copy of the syllabus, this includes theory knowledge and exams.
  9. Roundsounds

    Alternate organisation...deafening silence

    Maybe ELAAA, SAAA and AOPA could form a partnership of some sort? That’d sort out the level playing field issues AOPA have with RAA. What could possibly go wrong...
  10. Roundsounds

    New fuel rules start today 08/11/2018

    going places in a Yak 52 will be a pain. They hold 120 litres, use 12 for warmup / takeoff the burn about 60 litres per hour, which provides and endurance of 108 mins. Take your 30 mins off that and you’re left with 78 mins @ say 120 kts nil wind. Allow 10 mins for approach and you’ve got about 135 NM range nil wind. I’ve landed many times with both 12 litres lights flashing, which would mean under the new rules I’d need to call a Fuel Mayday. I don’t know if any Yak 52s having suffered from fuel exhaustion. Yak pilots are aware of the limitations and plan accordingly.
  11. Roundsounds

    New fuel rules start today 08/11/2018

    Whatever you do don’t tell them your gauges aren’t accurate. Just make up something and keep it in a folder undated. If you’re doing local operations or training, 30 mins is plenty for reserves.
  12. Roundsounds

    New fuel rules start today 08/11/2018

    Thank goodness, we should all feel so much safer now these new rules are in place. You’ll never see another Australian aircraft run out of fuel again. Much better to legislate than educate pilots. Particularly when the statistics show the incidence of fuel exhaustion have been steadily decreasing for the past 15 years and the bulk of incidents have involved commercial operators who have had mandated fuel reserves as part of their operations manual.
  13. CAR 206 defines commercial purposes and applies to RAAus operations. Based on this information there should be no reason you cannot use an RAAus aircraft for the purposes you have described. CIVIL AVIATION REGULATIONS 1988 - REG 206 Commercial purposes (Act, s 27(9))
  14. I’ve got a Piper J3 Cub, no batteries to worry about.
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