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Birdseye

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About Birdseye

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    Australia
  1. I assure you that it was, but whether it is now is hard to say as I can't find a current definitive document. I'd actually like to see more facts from the Facthunter.
  2. Roger is alive and kicking, but note that these days it only means you have received the last message, not that you have understood it! Affirmative is abbreviated to 'Affirm' to avoid confusion with negative in the case of clipped transmissions.
  3. Go back to the Air France crash over the South Atlantic. An aircraft that was in cruise, under stable flight conditions and with no other issues, crashed because the pilots failed to recognize they had lost airspeed indication.
  4. No I was not, I was saying that a navigation aid does not detect an aircraft, but a radar can. As to whether the entire suggestion in the article was total bollocks is another issue.
  5. " a powerful German omnidirectional radio navigation beam locked on to the Dutch aircraft." Presumably what they actually mean is that an axis radar illuminated them.
  6. I was fortunate enough to complete an introductory pilot course for the Trident, it was definitely a 4 + APU. On a warm day and a full load it probably wouldn't have got off the ground without the RB162 running. It was also potentially a very fast aeroplane, above M0.88 although BEA/BA didn't operate it at the higher speeds and the heavier 3b wasn't quite as quick.
  7. That could explain the plane-like structure seen near the camp huts! (circled in yellow)
  8. Possibly a better article: FAA follows Boeing’s 737 safety alert with an emergency directive
  9. I used to watch Spantax make a great smoke screen coming out of Bournemouth Airport. Always an entertaining departure.
  10. Bloody cheek, I was not wrong. What I posted was absolutely correct, alcohol exuded into the breath from the blood is used in BAC tests and is not discernible to the nose. Beer breath etc. as mentioned correctly by OME exists for a period after consumption and until digestion has occurred. I have known some real alcoholics, the sort that consume half a bottle of Scotch before I'd have my morning coffee, and I couldn't have picked them from appearance or smell at any normal distance.
  11. An incorrect assumption. The breath test measures the alcohol level in expelled air from the interaction with the blood and the lungs, not from vapours introduced by drinking. Somebody that smells of the alcoholic drink (after all alcohol itself is virtually free of any smell) will have consumed it relatively recently (or have spilled it down their jacket perhaps).
  12. If he was smelling of alcohol, then he had drunk some much more recently than the night before.
  13. High angle 'skip' using the occasional enhancement of the 'E' layer known as 'Sporadic E' can have effect into the VHF range. It renders very strong signals, but generally does not last long at the higher frequencies. I have used it on the amateur 144mHz frequencies, achieving distances in excess of 2000 kms. Atmospheric ducting can also work very well at VHF frequencies. However the OP has already said that it was only his equipment that was receiving the signals. Conditions are not that conducive to Sporadic E so early in the summer.
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