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lprigan1

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About lprigan1

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  • Location
    The Oaks
  • Country
    Australia
  1. Hi All Just wondering if anyone knows of a school that operates Drifters in the Sydney region (I currently fly out of the Oaks and am training with the Sydney Recreational Flying Club on Foxbats and Dave's Flying School on the Jabirus). I really love the look of the Drifters - they seem to represent real back to basics flying and have the romantic appeal of those early years in aviation with open cockpits, taildragger, fabric etcetc. Also, I am considering buying an aircraft and the Drifter would be top of the list as there seem to be quite a few around below the 25k mark and from what I am told (but happy to be corrected) they are pretty cheap to operate and maintain (my workings get to me about $90 per hour on 70hrs per year). Obviously, I don't want to just "jump" into an aircraft purchase and would want to explore whether I actually flying in (well, on really) the Drifter - I have some very mixed reviews about people's experiences. Anyway, any tips on where I could for a flight around Sydney would be greatly appreciated as would any thoughts on the Drifter in general.
  2. Welcome! Where are you doing your flying? Going solo is an amazing experience - I have a few solo hours now but that first solo circuit was probably one of the most memorable moments of my life.
  3. Hi SrPliot - agreed with all you say. The IAF has been very successful in converting the F16D into one of the most modern and capable aircraft around - TheF16I http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f-16i/ In this regard, it is interesting to note that the IAF, being the one Air Force in the world with the most air to air engagements since the 1950's and the most likely to be engaged in air to air combat in the future (i.e. agsinst Iran, Syria etc) has a very minimal order of F35s - 14 confirmed and an option for 17 more. Originally it was intended that the F22 ( a very beautiful and capable aircraft) would replace the aging fleet of 200+ F15s and F16s but due to US export restrictions this never happened. The F35 just doesn't fit the bill (though it might be useful for stealth attacks on for example, Iranian Nuclear reactors)
  4. Hi SrPliot - agreed with all you say. The IAF has been very successful in converting the F16D into one of the most modern and capable aircraft around - TheF16I http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/f-16i/ In this regard, it is interesting to note that the IAF, being the one Air Force in the world with the most air to air engagements since the 1950's and the most likely to be engaged in air to air combat in the future (i.e. agsinst Iran, Syria etc) has a very minimal order of F35s - 14 confirmed and an option for 17 more. Originally it was intended that the F22 ( a very beautiful and capable aircraft) would replace the aging fleet of 200+ F15s and F16s but due to US export restrictions this never happened. The F35 just doesn't fit the bill (though it might be useful for stealth attacks on for example, Iranian Nuclear reactors)
  5. The Israeli Air Force prides itself on using canon to shoot down other aircraft. Last one I heard about was an Israeli F15 shooting down a Syrian Mig 21 in the late 80's. Otherwise there was an A10 Warthog which shot down an Iragi Mil Mi 8 in 1991.
  6. The Israeli Air Force prides itself on using canon to shoot down other aircraft. Last one I heard about was an Israeli F15 shooting down a Syrian Mig 21 in the late 80's. Otherwise there was an A10 Warthog which shot down an Iragi Mil Mi 8 in 1991.
  7. Flying Jab 160s at the Oaks, take-off from Rwy 36 - there is a local condition which requires an early cross wind turn which in a Jab 160 is approx 300ft AGL. Turn onto downwind is at approx 600ft AGL and circuit height is only reached about 3/4 of the way down the down-wind leg. Once circuit height reached in the 160 you are pretty much doing your pre-landing checks readying for a turn onto base. Flying in the Foxbat it is sometimes scary to see how far out visiting Jabs will go for their (cross-country) circuits - surely it is safer to make your turns earlier (albeit lower) rather than fly 1nm out to be at circuit height when turning downwind?
  8. Flying Jab 160s at the Oaks, take-off from Rwy 36 - there is a local condition which requires an early cross wind turn which in a Jab 160 is approx 300ft AGL. Turn onto downwind is at approx 600ft AGL and circuit height is only reached about 3/4 of the way down the down-wind leg. Once circuit height reached in the 160 you are pretty much doing your pre-landing checks readying for a turn onto base. Flying in the Foxbat it is sometimes scary to see how far out visiting Jabs will go for their (cross-country) circuits - surely it is safer to make your turns earlier (albeit lower) rather than fly 1nm out to be at circuit height when turning downwind?
  9. Thanks for sharing! I was actually at the field that day when it happened and it is good to know the full story. As a very new pilot all these stories are invaluable in helping to learn from other peoples' mistakes. As an example, two things have been reinforced with me this week: 1. No low flying 2. Try to land without braking and where you do need to brake, make sure it is gentle and gradual
  10. Hi Mark - welcome! Plenty of us South Africans out in Australia too (the Sling seems to be doing a roaring trade)! Feel free to come say Howzit if you're ever in Aus! On a personal note - I have great memories of holidays with friends in Maputo!
  11. They certainly are. I did my first 10 hours or so flying with Dave and then moved over to SRFC. I had my first solo last week and it was fantastic to have both CFI's (Dave and Greg) waiting to shake my hand when I got back in!
  12. My last flight was a very special one - my first solo!! I still couldn't believe it when the CFI jumped out the plane and sent me off on my own. Just one circuit mind you but I have been riding high all week :)
  13. I have flown both the Jabiru LSA and SP500 with manual trim and the foxbat with electric. Hands down, electric trim is the worst, most finicky thing you have to deal with...
  14. STOL practice in a foxbat on the only dry 100m portion of a grass strip with an 8kt crosswind. Fun and just a little bit scary!
  15. Add it to the pre-take off checklist - "no live animals hiding in the cowling, wings or under the seats."
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