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Ron Hoey

New Plane

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Hot off the press. I've just placed an order for a Savannah VG XL kit and expect to take delivery around late January.

 

I'm as excited as a schoolboy on his first date!

 

Anybody built a Savannah and would like to share some tips and traps?

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

 

002_wave.gif.62d5c7a07e46b2ae47f4cd2e61a0c301.gif

 

 

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Hi Ron

 

Congrats on buying a Savannah - I understand your excitement - it still gets me like that and I have built 2 and had a large input to two others. I hope soon to sell my VG and build an XL.

 

Having had 4 built in my shed and also getting another couple of builders started, the best piece of advice I could give you is to spend some serious time sorting things out when your kit arrives. ICP have been known to leave a few critical bits out and you can spend many hours looking for a part that is just not there, so an early sort out will save time later. Also note that ther is no rhyme or reason to their numbering.

 

First put your manual in another folder with tagged and titled interleaves separating each chapter. Then get a heap of fairly large plastic bags (bin liner size). The next step is to lay everything out and then go through the first chapter (chapter 2 - right wing assy) and locate and cross off every piece and put in the bag. If you are spending too much time looking for one piece write down the piece number and the chapter on a list so when you find it later you know where it goes. When you have finished a chapter tie the bag and label in with chapter and assy name and proceed to the next chapter. After a while you will get to know the remaining pieces and it will get a lot quicker. If you make sure you are careful here to cross of every piece you will know at the end what you are missing and can get from the agent. Some missing bits can take 6 - 8 weeks to get and can hold you up if you don't know they are missing till you need them.

 

If you ever need advice I am happy to talk on phone, email or pm me here. I am in queensland so not much help with hands on, but I have been able to help many builders over the phone.

 

My other advice is to build a bench of the right size before the kit arrives. PM me for details if you are interested.

 

Mostly - have fun building -- I always do.

 

Cheers Bill

 

 

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Big congrats Ron and some great advice from Bill (thanks Bill)

 

Please Ron, take us all along for the ride through the build so others can learn and offer any help as well by posting...oh, and with pictures :big_grin:

 

 

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Thanks gents,

 

I have PMed you Bill and Admin, I will post a log, but could you give me a few hints on how to.

 

Thanks,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Hi all: I have already sent the following info on to Ron in a private message, however, I am posting it here in case there are others that are unaware of the other Savannah forum at Yahoo Groups. I hasten to add that I have no connection with the Yahoo forum other than as a member, and am not here to promote them as such. It is just that it also contains a wealth of info for those like Ron who are preparing to build a Savannah.

 

The other, Yahoo groups, Savannah Forum can be found at the following URL. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/savannahaircraft/

 

All the best

 

Ross

 

:big_grin:

 

 

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Ron,

 

A few things I wish someone had told me.

 

Bill's advice excellent. I separated the parts into labelled cardboard boxes. Worth the time tenfold.

 

Buy a good divided box and put all the nuts, bolts, washers, split pins etc in their respective well labelled homes. You may even wish to add to this collection as I found the supplied numbers lacking.

 

Buy a heap more clecos (cannot have too many) and an extra two pairs of quality cleco pliers. (you will see why when you receive the ICP ones) Keep the sized clecos in individual open containers.

 

You cannot have too many tie down straps when rolling the leading edge skins - at least one on every rib - bring them all in a little at a time and you will do it with ease.

 

Don't let the build manual get you down - hit the phone when it confuses you - and it will.

 

We purchased a pneumatic rivet gun from Supercheap for $80.00. A heap more smooth and gentle than the supplied unit - less chance of damaging the skins and a lot nicer to use. (there is over 14000 rivets to pull so don't discount this tip too readily)

 

Have a plan for applying the etch primer. I purchased it in spray cans (about twenty two of them) but would use a spray gun next time. This is when assembling the airframe not painting the aircraft.

 

Have the dash panel painted early and do not fit the support under it until the dash is well and truly in. Make up the dash when you need a break from the airframe. It is good fun and it is nice to look at when your pals come around.

 

Hope you enjoy the build.

 

Mark

 

demo16a.jpg.4ba2ac7cf3f96d99e35adbf1f384ac61.jpg

 

 

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Guest Walter Buschor

011_clap.gif.c796ec930025ef6b94efb6b089d30b16.gif

 

Hot off the press. I've just placed an order for a Savannah VG XL kit and expect to take delivery around late January. I'm as excited as a schoolboy on his first date!

 

Anybody built a Savannah and would like to share some tips and traps?

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

 

002_wave.gif.62d5c7a07e46b2ae47f4cd2e61a0c301.gif

Hi Ron,

 

it might be a bit late in the building game but I keep forgetting my password and therefore keep missing out in giving my 5 cents worth.

 

When building my Savannah ( in Bill Grieve's shed ) a few changes where made that I find make a real improvement.

 

1) junk the nosewheel axle and make - or have one made - one from chrome molly. This will save you untold grieve in the future. ( they have been known to break )

 

Another method is to retain the alluminium axle and use much longer bolts then supplied or perhaps a rod that goes all the way through. I personally prefer the new axle.

 

2) junk the supplied carpet . it is good for a pattern though. we have used a carpet from clark rubber ( the blue stuff ) . it is no heavier but much harder wearing and looks so much better.

 

3) consider making a luggage extension. I think that this has been mentioned in the build manual. It is a little extra work but worth it in the long run.

 

4) main undercarriage brackets.

 

these need to be ground down on the back of the inside to achieve the correct gap as stated in the manual. ( I think it was 12mm ) . If you do this do NOT grind the outside as well . If you do the bracket will bend as there is no longer sufficient strengh in it. Without modifing these units it is impossible to achieve the correct setting. most don't worry though.

 

5) fit fuel taps to each tank. the tanks will " crossfeed" when the plane sits on a slope ie: sideways. ( as an added benefit you can turn one off should you ever have a leaking tank.- This happened to me -

 

6) make teflon rings to fit the gaps left open between the bearing washer and the wheel. ( I'd be happy to supply you some ) . this will prevent sand and grit to enter the bearing . I've had them fitted since new and have never had any dirt in the bearing.)

 

7) fit extra seals under the fuel caps. the one supplied is not thick enough and your pride and joy will have lovely fuel-runs on the wings after your first flights without them.

 

8) you might have to make throttle stops as in some cases when throtteling back you pull against the throttle stop of the carburettors. as you know this is not a good practise. I've therefore made a bracket to fit over the throttle rods and they contact the firewall when the throttle is closed. this has fixed that problem . as an added bonus the idle is now set at 1500 rpm when stationary and I can no longer stop the engine by pulling too hard on the throttle plunger.

 

9) remove the ridge from the inside of the rimhalfs and buff it really smooth. The tubes tend to rub on these and every now and then you get a flat tyre.

 

I can't think of anything else anymore

 

happy building

 

Walter

 

savannah_doc.jpg.5a672300d19ddc79df1279559bbeabdf.jpg

 

DSCF5603.jpg.fb254c8ef0c391742b090d1919303fb1.jpg

 

 

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No Steve,

 

But its getting closer by the day. You know what it's like 90% done and 90% to go, but looking good. Just the frustrating little bits that seem to take more time than the big bits.

 

Hope all is well.

 

Regards,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Guest Walter Buschor

Hi Ron,

 

pls. post some pictures of your Savy,

 

I'd really like to see it.

 

I also remember all those "little bits" at the end. It seemed to go on forever. I might just point out a few things that you probably have done anyway but I feel it dosen't hurt to say it again.

 

1) check ALL the hoses around the engine and make SURE nothing can chafe against each other. When fitting the coolant hoses to the radiator make shure that the hose and the radiator are DRY and do not have ANY coolant on them.( mine blew off during the first run up even though they where tight ! they still slipped off due to the lubricating effect of the coolant that dribbeled out when I tightened the hoses as they were not quite tight enough ).

 

2) make a second seal for each tank lid as the one supplied is too thin and fuel will leak out no matter how tight it is.

 

3) use the supplied battery in the lawn mower and buy one that is fully sealed and does not leak acid fumes into the fusealge.

 

4) bend the doors for a better fit. I used a lump of wood and placed it in the middle of the bottom edge and pushed at both bottom corners. This made the doors seal better.

 

5) fit a "LIP" at the back of the air-intake on top of the fuselage. This will help stop water flowing throgh the venthole unhindered.

 

6) my engine could be stopped when the throttle was closed. I made up a bracket that fits around the throttle linkage that contacts the firewall at 1400 rpm. It also prevents the cables frm being pulled against the stops on the carbies and putting stress on them.

 

7) I do consider it worthwhile to put seals on the wheels between the rim and the washer.( I turned some up out of teflon as mentioned in an earlier thread ) . these things really do work. I have not had any dirt or grit in my wheels ever no matter where I land. Without these the bearings will have to be washed a lot and they still have to grind up all the dirt that damages the bearing surfaces.

 

I can't think of anything else.

 

take care , safe flying

 

the grey Nomad

 

 

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Wow! Thanks for all the detailed tips.

 

I am at the point of connecting up the cooling system to complete the engine, so all the engine tips are most timely.

 

AeroKits has some thicker fuel cap seals which address the problem with leakage.

 

The doors were an engineering marvel until it came time to fit them. I settled for the rear not fully sealing at this stage and will see how that works when I fly it. I installed the AeroKits 3 point door latches which work a treat.

 

The bearing seal idea is great. Would you mind describing in detail what they are?

 

It's been 6 1/2 months to get this far and now it appears the prop extension supplied is no good, so I am waiting for a replacement which will stop me within sight of the finish line.

 

Thanks again for posting these and the previous tips. I'll try to post some photos when I figure out how to do it.

 

Regards,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Waiting!!!

 

Hi Mark,

 

I have it pretty well finished apart from the Prop Extension for which I have been waiting the last 2-3 weeks.

 

The original, I was informed, is no good and a new version is being manufactured. So I wait.

 

I'm really pleased with the outcome so far, just a little frustrated at the 11th hour delay.

 

How are things in Vic?

 

Ron.

 

 

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Guest Decca

While you're waiting, Ron, are you any relation to Steve Hoey, Ansett flight engineer?

 

Decca.

 

 

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Howdy Ron,

 

We were a little suspect re the extension from the off. How does the extra leverage/stress affect the gearbox? Is the modified one redesigned to minimise this? If so it's well worth the wait I think.

 

Glad to hear you are so far along. Looking forward to checking your new XL out at Temora next Easter.

 

Things pretty good over here. Give us a yell if you want to fly over in your pride and joy. Murray Bridge to Echuca is three and a half hours at 80 knots. EAC has a Sunday lunch from time to time, would be a good day out now that daylight saving is here again.

 

Regards,

 

Mark

 

 

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Hi Ron. Very interested in your progress. I have just landed a VG XL in kit form & am in the process of collating all the bits. Nearly gave up until I read your thread. Will perservere now.

 

Just "clecoed" the fin & immediatley struck trouble with alignment of holes. Anyway will look at closer & see if I'm being over critical tomorrow.

 

Excuse my ignorance but why is it suggested all metal to metal contact be via supplied primer? Is it only dissimilar metals or ALL metal contact? And does this not mean that the electrical conductivity between "bits" will be compromised?

 

Surely it is of paramount importance to have an all metal plane electrically conductive throughout, if for no other reason than to inhibit static build up?

 

Cheers,

 

Gordon.

 

 

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Hi Gordo,

 

Congratulations on your choice, you won't be disappointed.

 

I really don't know the answer to your question as I had exactly the same thoughts but just went ahead and did what brighter heads than mine suggested. Mine are all painted with the black stuff and an electrician did tests and found that I had no voltage drop through the body, so don't be too concerned about that aspect.

 

"Tomorrow" is a good idea. I had numerous situations in which I had no answer to a problem but, after a night's sleep, the answer was right there when I first looked at the problem next day.

 

The instruction manual will be your biggest headache. Just ask, ask and ask again, we all had to do it, so don't be afraid to call and if it doesn't seem right, get a second opinion.

 

Best of luck and have fun.

 

Ron.

 

 

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Hi Ron. Very interested in your progress. I have just landed a VG XL in kit form & am in the process of collating all the bits. Nearly gave up until I read your thread. Will perservere now.Just "clecoed" the fin & immediatley struck trouble with alignment of holes. Anyway will look at closer & see if I'm being over critical tomorrow.

 

Excuse my ignorance but why is it suggested all metal to metal contact be via supplied primer? Is it only dissimilar metals or ALL metal contact? And does this not mean that the electrical conductivity between "bits" will be compromised?

 

Surely it is of paramount importance to have an all metal plane electrically conductive throughout, if for no other reason than to inhibit static build up?

 

Cheers,

 

Gordon.

Moisture:crying: my lad is the killer and lap joints are a vunerable area.Static build up can be minimized by static discharge wicks and the electrical parth via the rivets is sufficient for conductivity.Saying that, you should run all ground lines to a earth bus which is connected to the battery to avoid radio interference CheersT87

 

 

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Ron, thanks for the advice. I need to keep asking as I have a tendency to try too long to self fix. However, your philosophy seems very sound.

 

Gordo.

 

 

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I think you will find that the use of primer between mating parts is to inhibit corrosion caused by moisture getting in, even though they are the same metal. It is the chemicals in the moisture that do the damage, rather than dissimilar metals. The rivets, screws, bolts or whatever you use will provide the electrical conductivity, even if the primer will not pass current.

 

 

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Guest milton56

Hi Ron,

 

I've just finished my VG and it has just had its maiden flight (yahoo). Evidently it's the 100th Savannah in Australia according to Cam from Camelot Aviation. The picture in my avitar is just one of the photos/videos of the my Savannah I took while I was in a mates Plane. Hope yours is in the air soon.

 

Regards

 

Milton56:clap:

 

 

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