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Ron Hoey

New Plane

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Congratulations Milton. I bet that was a thrill. I'm so looking forward to seeing mine at the same stage as you.

 

I have been in NT for the past 3 months and haven't done a thing to my plane since October. However I'm at the stage of bolting on the prop and getting it started. Hope to have it airbourne by the end of January.

 

Regards and best wishes,

 

Ron

 

 

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Guest Walter Buschor

Hi Milton,

 

Congratulations & well done ! Most things about the Savvy have been said so there is little I can add. One thing of interest for all Savvy owners though is the air inlet hose ( red with a hardened coil wire ) . This hose goes past the side of the black coolant inlet tank ( sorry about the description as it might be called something else ) . What can happen after a few hundred hours is that the rubbing of the red hose against the coolant thank will chafe a hole into the tank with resultant coolant loss. This has happened to another Savannah after about 500hrs. The leak happens due to the fact that the wire in the hose is hardened steel and the tank is soft and thin aluminium. Once the hose coating has worn away and the wire hits the steel it is only a matter of time. So I suggest to keep an eye on it or better create a little space between the two parts.

 

That's it from me and I'll finish with this waffle and get ready to go to Evans head.

 

fly safe

 

Walter

 

 

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Guest milton56

Hi Ron

 

Are you flying the Savannah yet

 

Regards

 

Milton56:thumb_up:

 

 

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Not quite but almost!

 

Hi guys,

 

Thanks for the interest.

 

On Friday 29th Jan we set the prop pitch (Bolly 3 blade) and proceeded with the start-up routine. All went well and it runs sweet as a nut.

 

Did a few figure 8s in the paddock later to test out the ground controls - no problems.

 

Monday is W&B, then on to the inspection, hopefully during the same week, but that's up to the availability of the inspector.

 

Picture in my gallery.

 

Will keep you posted.

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Inspection Tomorrow

 

Hi all,

 

Final inspection will occur tomorrow, Thursday 4 Feb.

 

Excitedly anticipating the big tick 10 days short of a year since commencement.

 

:big_grin:

 

 

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Final inspection

 

Hi all,

 

The Weight and Balance went according to the book last Monday and Thursday's pre-flight inspection went well. Now it's just a wait for the paperwork to cycle through RAAus and the provisional rego to return; then we are airborne.

 

A few things that came out of the inspection:-

 

The flaperon control rods need to be tightly fitted but need to pivot through their range of movement. This is achieved by padding them out with AN5 washers (not in the kit). Washers must be AN as non-spec ones tend to be too big and can jam or stiffen the mechanism.

 

Don't put too much grease on lubricated joints.

 

There needs to be a stainless steel plate with the AC rego number stamped or engraved on it affixed somewhere on the airframe. It doesn't have to be visible. The idea is that it will survive a catastrophic fire should the AC crash and burn and will assist the investigators identify the AC. This is additional to the one supplied in the kit, which must also be fitted.

 

There needs to be placarding on the instrument panel to indicate which way switches are 'on' and 'off'.

 

I have fitted long-range fuel tanks so have 4 fuel taps, one from each tank. Each needs to be identified with a placard as well as an 'on/off' indicator (tap in line is not sufficient).

 

The inspection process was more of a learning experience than a 'test'. The inspector was extremely knowledgeable and most helpful with suggestions and not at all threatening.

 

Hoping this is of value to others.

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Ron, just wondering if you have made a start as yet. I have finished most of the tail - seem to be going Ok. The elevator trim stopped me, it seems to be about 6mm thicker that the back of the elevator, if anyone has a dimension for total thickness of the trim tab I would much appreciate it.

 

Thanks, Peter

 

 

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Hi all,The Weight and Balance went according to the book last Monday and Thursday's pre-flight inspection went well. Now it's just a wait for the paperwork to cycle through RAAus and the provisional rego to return; then we are airborne.

 

A few things that came out of the inspection:-

 

The flaperon control rods need to be tightly fitted but need to pivot through their range of movement. This is achieved by padding them out with AN5 washers (not in the kit). Washers must be AN as non-spec ones tend to be too big and can jam or stiffen the mechanism.

 

Don't put too much grease on lubricated joints.

 

There needs to be a stainless steel plate with the AC rego number stamped or engraved on it affixed somewhere on the airframe. It doesn't have to be visible. The idea is that it will survive a catastrophic fire should the AC crash and burn and will assist the investigators identify the AC. This is additional to the one supplied in the kit, which must also be fitted.

 

There needs to be placarding on the instrument panel to indicate which way switches are 'on' and 'off'.

 

I have fitted long-range fuel tanks so have 4 fuel taps, one from each tank. Each needs to be identified with a placard as well as an 'on/off' indicator (tap in line is not sufficient).

 

The inspection process was more of a learning experience than a 'test'. The inspector was extremely knowledgeable and most helpful with suggestions and not at all threatening.

 

Hoping this is of value to others.

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

Well done Ron. I still have not progressed very far with my build as I have been concentrating on GFPT. Finally got it pre Xmas & now hope to move on with nav's.

 

Anyhow, re regular inspections of your build. How did you organise it, what was involved & were you happy overall?

 

Forgive me if you have already talked about this in previous logs & am happy to troll through if needed.

 

Regards,

 

Gordon.

 

 

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Hi Gordo,

 

There were no regular inspections required, just battle on through. Having said that, it would be nice to have a L4 or someone who has previously built a Savannah look in occasionally, just for reassurance.

 

Overall I'm delighted with the result and look forward to getting it in the air next week.

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Hi Peter,

 

I do recall I had a similar query when I was at your stage, but I can't recall the detail.

 

Next time I'm in the hangar I'll take a look and let you know the dimensions if you haven't got them by then.

 

Blue skies

 

 

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Many thanks Ron, I would really appreciate that dimension before I rivet the tab, no hurry, I have plenty of other things to rivet. I would also be very interested to know how you set up the 4 fuel taps, and what sort you used as I am installing 4 tanks as well. Congratulations on passing the inspection with no significant problems and please let us know how it flies!

 

Peter

 

 

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Fuel taps

 

Hi Peter,

 

Re the fuel, I bought a pair of manifolds which I installed above the end of the aluminium tube rising from the fuel collector tank. I got mine from Camelot Aviation, but Reg Brost has a good set available at AeroKits (he also provides excellent instructions and is easily accessible for advice).

 

I also changed the fuel breather arrangement. The original runs a breather through the wing skins terminating under the wing. I heard complaints that the fuel often drained out when tanks were full and that when a second tank is installed it is very close to the breather tube so, if there is a little movement in the second tank, it could block off the breather and stop the fuel flow. So I went for the conventional tube sticking straight up from the filler cap.

 

I attempted to attach photos but managed to wipe out the message when I attached them, so I haven't attached this time. If photos would help send me a PM with your personal e-mail and I'll send them that way.

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron.

 

 

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Fuel breathers

 

I know many of you are concerned about the fuel tank vents, as I was.

 

My solution (about version 3) is in the attached photo.

 

The idea I copied from the oldest plane I could find, a Gazelle.

 

The fuel tank vents are a piece of aluminium tube the right size to fit over the supplied connector and the top is a plastic foot for a stool or something with a leg. Both from Bunnings.

 

The top of the cap is separated from the top of the tube to allow air through, but, as a precaution, I also drilled a small hole in the leading edge of the tube underneath the cap. Both are riveted together at the back, which pushes the leading edge of the cap forward to catch the airflow.

 

I think it will work OK.

 

Blue skies all,

 

Ron.

 

P2040077.thumb.jpg.567a4113832ed037888b1527a56e4ab7.jpg

 

 

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Test flight

 

Hi all,

 

The test flight went well.

 

It almost never happened as the weather was RS.

 

The test pilot made it to within 4Nm of Callington and had to turn back as the cloud was almost touching the high ground.

 

2 hours later he got in and had enough time to do the tests and get home before the rain started.

 

All this in a drought and following weeks of clear weather in the high 30s!!!!!

 

He was glowing in his praises for the aircraft and there were no adjustments necessary.

 

95 kt indicated at 5000 rpm and a climb-out of 1000 fpm with little effort.

 

He reported that the stall is gentle and is more like parachuting down with a nose-high attitude after a gentle shutter and level stall.

 

Would you believe it? No sooner had he left than the weather turned to crap again and the rain followed shortly after.

 

So I never got to fly it!

 

I'll try again today when the change comes.

 

Thanks for all your input, encouragement and assistance.

 

Blue skies,

 

Ron Hoey.

 

 

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Congratulations!

 

Ron,

 

Great news and well done. You have achieved something very special!

 

See you both soon.

 

Regards,

 

Mark D

 

 

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Fantastic Ron, Congratulations. 95 knots is amazing, you must have done a superb job. Hope I get to see the aircraft some day. Perhaps you could drop by the Sunshine Coast on the first "Around Australia".

 

Cya Peter

 

 

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My first flight

 

Well it all happened this morning.

 

A very thorough pre-flight and a deep breath as the harness clicked shut.

 

Another deep breath as I finished the run-up and prepared to transmit my enter/backtrack/intention message.

 

Every rivet, nut, bolt, cable and wire had been mentally revisited overnight and now it was time to put them to work.

 

Six hundred metres of runway ahead of me and I'm used to sixteen hundred, gee, that looks short.

 

Power on slowly, one, two, three, firewall and the nose is up and in no time and we are airborne. Overhead the cross-strip at 200 feet and still 400 odd metres of runway in front of us!!!

 

AND I DIDN'T USE FLAPS!!!

 

Overhead the end of the strip and that lovely long nose is pulling me towards the clouds at 1000 fpm and I need to be careful not to exceed circuit height before I turn cross wind.

 

That first turn was so gentle with no need for rudder, at first I thought the ball was stuck!

 

Trimmed up, we turned downwind and did all the checks, a little slowly as I'm still getting used to the location of everything being used to a Jabiru.

 

It was a pretty quick downwind, as I had yet to sort out best speed for circuits, and before I knew it I'm throttling back and setting up the landing. No flaps again, the plan was to do this one clean.

 

Approach was smooth at 45 knots with a trickle of throttle needed to overcome a little sink and it was a piece of cake to keep her lined up with the Savvie's lovely big rudder.

 

Throttle back as the fence was cleared, nose up a little and the landing was so smooth I hardly felt the main gear touch the ground!

 

Taxi back and celebrate my first flight with both a Tiger Moth driver and a Gazelle driver in the parking area.

 

What a plane!!

 

 

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One thing I learned today

 

When I was putting together my instrument panel I thought it was a good idea to put the radio toggle switch (you know, the one with which you can toggle between radio channels) on the panel alongside the throttle, so I could operate it without taking my hand from the throttle.

 

Great idea in theory.

 

When it came to practice, however, when doing a few touch and goes, I was hitting the toggle switch each time pushed the throttle forward, changing channels. It became clear when Adelaide Radar wanted to know who was the unknown call-sign talking to them. Oops!

 

So it's now moved out of harm's way.

 

So, not all good ideas are great ideas.

 

 

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Elevator trim

 

Ron, just wondering if you have made a start as yet. I have finished most of the tail - seem to be going Ok. The elevator trim stopped me, it seems to be about 6mm thicker that the back of the elevator, if anyone has a dimension for total thickness of the trim tab I would much appreciate it.Thanks, Peter

Hi Peter,

 

I had a look at mine and it is marginally thicker than the elevator. If you are comparing the holed surfaces which face each other, the one on the trim is considerably wider but it is on an angle when fitted, therefore reducing the thickness of the finished product.

 

Hope this helps,

 

Ron.

 

 

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