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Manwell

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  • Content Count

    167
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44 Excellent

About Manwell

  • Rank
    Well-known member

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  • Aircraft
    Retired
  • Location
    Brisbane
  • Country
    Australia

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  1. Ian asked for brutal honesty. I gave it to him. Guilty as charged. If we genuinely want to do and be better, we wouldn't shoot the messenger. Do I get a special avatar or something to go with the title? Something like the Tassie Devil cartoon guy would be nice.
  2. Since you asked, I don't want you to do anything Ian. To be brutally honest, it doesn't bother me whether this site fails or succeeds, that's your concern. Regarding Facebook, not many users like dealing with the devil, but there ain't many other viable options available, and it's really only as bad or good as users allow it to be. One thing it doesn't do is stifle intelligent, informed, cutting edge debate, and that's good. It superficially fills a huge need for social contact that's missing in society today, and that's an opportunity you can tap into as well. The key, if you ask me, is personal contact... BTW, if you think honourable intentions ensure wild success, you're dreaming. Don't aim for success either, it's way oversold. Aim for something simple and worthwhile. To me, it seems like you have to make a clear choice about what you want to achieve. Come up with a guiding principle that directs your purpose for the site. e.g. To enable people with an interest in aviation to connect and share their knowledge and experience for everyone's benefit. That's just an example though. It's gotta be what you want the site to be, then all you have to do is make it be that. Simple, but not easy. Regardless of what anyone says, it has to be your choice because it's what suits you. If it happens to suit us as well, then that's a bonus.
  3. Sure, but when he makes it public, and pushes it on others, then it does. I'd agree with you about him not saving QANTAS too. His job is to destroy it, and since it wasn't built in a day, much like Rome, it takes a while to trash.
  4. Have to agree with you there turbo! Especially if they're on the receiving or extorting end of Govt largesse. Just judging by a person's attitude to Govt, it's pretty easy to tell which side they're on, isn't it?
  5. turbo, you can assume whatever you like about me, but all you have to do is ask and I'd tell you the answer. I've had enough experience with the people who make up Governments to know exactly what I'm talking about. For example, I know enough to know that they wouldn't be averse to funding social media shills to promote the Govt line and keep us tax slaves in line.
  6. Thanks turbo, I am happy. Happy that I no longer live in a fantasy world of my own making. Govt only exists by creating the illusion that only they can fix the problems that they actually created in the first place, and once enough of us get that through our thick skulls, we really do have a chance to live free of delusion and the many associated dramas that come along with flawed thinking. As Ronald Reagan famously said, "Government isn't the solution, it's the problem."
  7. turbo, if you really believe Joyce has helped QANTAS, you simply don't understand anything about human nature long term. It may have been Eddington who was first cast to destroy a great airline, if so, he certainly started the ball rolling by merging Australian into QANTAS to sweeten it up for sale. It was then handed to Joyce to continue what's known in economics as the "creative destruction" of a great company with a perfect safety record, and a solid culture. If Qantas is making money, it's due to it's sound fiscal management, long term relationships and past record, but those only last so long. Joyce is slowly killing it with kindness, and his recent "marriage" is a clue to how he's doing it.
  8. If the man from Govt says I'm here to help you, you know you're about to be screwed. I'll give some examples that is a reason to abandon a fantastic opportunity offered by Govt. Just one should do. It's offered by Govt.
  9. Well, I'll be damned. You mean people don't know how to do that economically yet? I guess it would be a bit disruptive to the oil and Govt illusion. It's not rocket science, ya know. It's submarine science ...
  10. Considering every possible engine design and fuel source, and since we mostly have ICE's already, the best fuel source would have to be water. Most bang for buck by far, and zero emissions. Hydrogen/Oxygen.
  11. I don't get your point Space. What "school education", and how would they learn how to fly if they didn't spend anything on practical lessons?
  12. You're absolutely right Space. Without all the bureaucracy, we would have learned how to fly a damn sight better than we do now. Yes, it is like riding a bicycle, and it really should be that simple.
  13. Here it is Wirraway. This post refers to the title, How to Fly. Your reply describes how to get a license and maybe even a career driving aircraft around the sky, not how to fly. Don't let that discourage you though. Have another shot.
  14. Manwell

    Stalls

    Thanks for the info gents. I can see if you have "great big airbrakes", carrying excess speed wouldn't be a problem. In slippery powered aircraft though, carrying an extra few knots for mum and kids ends up putting pilots in the danger zone of low and slow for longer, which increases the risk of an untidy arrival, rather than reducing it. The listed approach speed already has a safety factor built in, and the more conservative pilots become, the more likely they'll end up coming unstuck. I know this sounds counter-intuitive, but think about it like this - if you try to insure yourself against accidents by taking the easy way too much, you'll never develop the skills needed in a real emergency and won't be able to handle it when the inevitable happens. This was illustrated in James Reason's Swiss Cheese model of accident causation, where there were two slices of Swiss Cheese with holes in them, and all that needed to happen was for one of the holes in each piece to line up for an accident to result. It was also contained in the old adage about pilots starting their career with 2 cups - one empty, and the other full. The full cup was filled with luck, and the empty one was for experience. The trick is to fill the cup of experience before the cup of luck runs out, and that doesn't happen if you avoid improving skills. There was another old saying about the superior pilot uses his superior judgement to avoid situations requiring the use of his superior skills, and that's true too!
  15. Manwell

    Stalls

    Don't you see 150% of stall speed while trying to land as a potential problem too Bruce?
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