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fly_tornado

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Everything posted by fly_tornado

  1. Angel Flight, Aircraft Owners Assn fighting CASA regulation plan Sally [email protected] 31 Jan 2019, 8 p.m. News Baby Lotus and her mother Sarah ready for their flight in Angel Flight board chairman, Bill Bristow's Pilatus jet. Picture - Geoff Marsh. Aa Rural communities around Australia are outraged at a proposal by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to introduce a new minimum safety standard for community service flights that have the potential to ground Angel Flight Australia. The charity coordinates non-emergency flights to assist country people to access specialist medical treatment that would otherwise be unavailable because of vast distance and high travel costs, utilising volunteer pilots. Angel Flight’s CEO, Marjorie Pagani, the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia, Queensland’s opposition spokesman for volunteers, Lachlan Millar, and Kennedy MP, Bob Katter, have all condemned the proposal, which they say is a gross discrimination against rural people. All have demanded that the federal government intervene to prevent the new standards from coming into being. “What CASA is saying is that I can fly you to Toowoomba any day of the week to go shopping but as soon as you say you’re going there for medical purposes, I’m not qualified to fly you,” Ms Pagani said. “It defies belief.” She said the proposal, which related to licensing requirements, minimum pilot experience and maintenance-related enhancements, showed CASA had lost confidence in its own licencing system, under which the charity’s pilots and aircraft operated. “Why else would they place these restrictions on lawfully licenced pilots,” she said. “The long and short of it is, why are we suddenly unsafe if we want to help a rural person? “There is no nation in the world that restricts a pilot’s licence according to the needs of their passengers.” Related: CASA wants to clip Angel Flight wings Angel Flight free to fly Further unleashing her dismay at the potential the changes would have on what has become an essential service, conducting 4000 trips a year, Ms Pagani was critical of the way CASA had apparently circumvented the usual regulatory process, and what she said was the “invention” of a community service flight category. She described the standards as a “grab bag” of restrictions that were unrelated to the two fatal accidents, in 2011 and 2017, that are understood to be at the crux of the changes. She said any improvement to the service would come from safety education, which she had been working with CASA on for 18 months, not aircraft standards. One of the changes proposed would increase minimum pilot hour requirements, which would preclude some of the volunteers with lower hours. Another requires aircraft engines to be maintained to commercial charter standards, which could cost $85,000 or more. In outlining its need for consultation, CASA said a regulatory baseline would provide clarity regarding an appropriate minimum safety standard. It anticipated most pilots currently conducting community safety flights would meet the proposed new standards. While CASA said Angel Flight pilots didn’t operate under the safety umbrella of an Air Operator’s Certificate, which commercial operators work under, Ms Pagani said users were comprehensively briefed on procedures and made aware of all aspects, including watching a video, before they were introduced to a pilot. Benjamin Morgan, the executive director of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association of Australia, accused CASA of highlighting two tragic accidents, both found to have been the result of pilot error, from over 46,000 successful flights, to manipulate public perception of the service. “The elephant in the room is aviation safety, which should be addressed by communication, collaboration and education, not by ramming enforcement regulations through that only cover the backside of a bureaucrat if something happens,” he said. “We have to not overreact to a situation in a way that means we can no longer provide a service.” Calls for intervention Mr Morgan called on every Australian to contact their local MP and demand they oppose the changes, saying the next group to be affected could be private individuals transporting people to doctor’s appointments in their cars. “Will they demand they have motor car engine overhauls or a higher degree of driver training?” One politician who has called on the federal government, particularly transport minister Michael McCormack. to intervene is Queensland opposition spokesman on emergency services and volunteers, Lachlan Millar. “I am outraged that an unelected bureaucrat can ground the charity, Angel Flight, with a flick of a pen and no federal parliamentary scrutiny,” he said. “The Civil Aviation Authority’s plan will ground 80 per cent of the volunteer pilots who take rural and remote patients for non-emergency treatments such as dialysis. “This plan will cause real pain to rural people. Angel Flight pilots are everyday heroes. They make a major difference and actually help governments by reducing the cost of delivering health care in the bush. “I am publicly asking the deputy Prime Minister and federal transport minister, Michael McCormack, to intervene and fix this.” He was joined by KAP leader and federal Member for Kennedy, Bob Katter, in calling out the Civil Aviation Safety Authority for what he called their latest show of incompetence, which he said could kill Angel Flight. “One of Dick Smith’s finest moments was his attack upon CASA; CASA has downed more planes than the Red Baron,” Mr Katter said, adding the authority had repeatedly displayed its ineptitude. “To take Angel Flight out of the skies is to remove the mantle of safety put there by Reverend John Flynn and his Royal Flying Doctor Service, and I speak with great passion because both my father and his brother died at the hands of that Australian tyrant – the tyranny of distance. “When you protect your precious statistics, that conciliatory is costing us lives. “It is quite clear to me these very generous self-sacrificing pilot-owners cannot afford to take the risks of CASA prosecutions – the safety Nazis – and we will lose this wonderful service.” Mr Katter said he had contacted the minister for transport and demanded his immediate intervention and asked rural chambers of commerce, flyers, clubs and councils to join the fight on this issue. The public consultation period, launched after federal parliament rose in December, closed on Thursday. CASA and transport minister, Michael McCormack, were contacted for comment.
  2. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    these changes won't stop human error though, they will grind down angel flight
  3. you can almost buy 3 A320s for the price of an A380. most airlines have years and years of experience running smaller planes only Emirates seems to be able to make the A380 work for them
  4. fly_tornado

    Wellcamp

    At the time the brisbane west wellcamp name did seem like CASA thought the whole thing was a bit of a laugh. It's a shame that so many people took it so seriously.
  5. fly_tornado

    Wellcamp

    I always thought that the Brisbane West Wellcamp name, was a way of not confusing the old toowoomba airport with the new one, now that the new one hasn't significantly impacted air traffic in Australia they've gone back to the more obvious name. Wellcamp has been going now for 5 years, still no closer to getting a flight to Bali.
  6. fly_tornado

    Wellcamp

    the local chamber of commerce getting ready to put their hands out for some sponsorship, but probably not a good idea to mention that its been 4.5 years and the traffic growth has plateaued Wellcamp underpinning Toowoomba's growth by Jo Sheppard, Toowoomba Chamber of Commerce CEO 12th Feb 2019 5:00 AM Subscriber only ON NOVEMBER 17, 2014, the first scheduled passenger service started operation between Sydney Airport and Wellcamp airport and the airport, and our community have not looked back since. The connectivity that Toowoomba Wellcamp Airport provides not only significantly improves the liveability of our city, but it is also directly and indirectly supporting business growth across the region. Toowoomba Chamber of Commerce CEO Jo Sheppard.Contributed Last week, the chamber was pleased to be involved in Provincial Distributors Food Services Trade Show held at the showgrounds here in Toowoomba. The trade show was the biggest of its kind held outside a capital city and considerably boosted by the connectivity now provided by Wellcamp Airport. The trade show saw more than 70 exhibitors come together to showcase their products including local food suppliers supported by the chamber's FAN (Food and Agri Network) along with some of the biggest national food brands as well. In speaking with many of the exhibitors, the direct Qantas and Air North flights from Sydney and Melbourne into Toowoomba made it feasible for national food brands based in the South to participate in the trade show. Weekly Cathay Pacific cargo services started in November 2016 from Wellcamp to Hong Kong and we have seen confidence in Toowoomba's future as a transport, logistics and export hub continue to grow. From the establishment of new businesses such as freight forwarding company Australian International Logistics to the continued growth of the likes of AgEtal (agricultural testing and export compliance service providers) the flow on effect from Wellcamp airport is evident. Join the growing community movement powered by people who believe in our region, and who believe that we deserve great connectivity for our families and businesses. By taking the pledge to fly local you are working alongside the rest of the region to grow air services for the region. If you would like to get involved in I Fly Toowoomba, head to Wellcamp airport's website or contact the chamber.
  7. Councils cannot afford regional security upgrades, say experts ABC Central West By Kate Cowling Updated Thu at 11:20am PHOTO: Experts say regional airport security should be assessed, but upgrades are a big ask for councils. (ABC South East NSW: Bill Brown) RELATED STORY: Counter-terrorism crackdown at airports could threaten regional flights RELATED STORY: Airport upgrade plans lead Regional Express airline to remove services RELATED STORY: Will Australia's small airports soon be a thing of the past? Aviation security experts say regional airports are vulnerable to crime, but local councils do not have the money to make them safer and promised counter-terrorism funding is yet to be released. The Federal Government announced in last year's budget that $50.1 million over four years would be made available to upgrade screening equipment at regional airports. The bulk of that money would be dispersed to "pre-identified eligible regional airports," who applied to the Department of Home Affairs. Eligibility is based on departing passenger data, the capacity of the planes operating at the airports and existing screening equipment, according to the department. "Upgrading airport screening technology is one of the most effective changes we can make to address the increasing sophistication of explosives and other threats," a spokesperson for the Department of Home Affairs said. PHOTO: Security experts say regional airports provide essential services on a shoestring. (ABC News: Giulio Saggin) "In recognition of the cost impacts of new technology upgrades on critical regional aviation services, the Government will provide funding of $50.1 million to eligible airports to help implement the new arrangements." The spokesperson said the list of airports invited to apply could not be released for security reasons. Security concerns But Roger Henning, the founder of crisis management consultancy Homeland Security Asia/Pacific, said there were more pressing problems. He said regional airports were essential, but "three strands of wire fence" was not enough protection and inconsistent identification requirements needed to change. "When it comes to aviation, it's a different story." PHOTO: Last year's Federal Budget included $50.1 million in funding for upgrades to 64 regional airports.(ABC Central West: Kate Cowling) Mr Henning said uniform standards around identification and staff training should be priority areas. Mike Carmody, the former chief of security for the Federal Airports Corporation at Sydney Airport, agreed there were some basics — like staff capability to respond to threats — that should be on the agenda, but it was a difficult ask for airport operators. "We carry on about full body scanning and passenger profiling and it's all well and good, but when you start looking at regional ports that have no money and regional communities absolutely rely on, they don't even have fencing or lighting," he said. "You could say it's a cop out, but it's a reality." A matter of cost In 2017, Kempsey Shire Council was ordered to pay $186,000 to a pilot after a landing plane was damaged when it hit a kangaroo. PHOTO: The Court of Appeals found the council did not have the money to upgrade fencing. (ABC News: Nicole Chettle) The District Court found the council, as the responsible operator of the Kempsey Aerodrome, had failed to build a kangaroo-proof fence and was therefore liable for the cost of the damage incurred, plus interest. The verdict was recently overturned on appeal, after the court found the council did not have the funds to upgrade fencing and the risk of kangaroos was apparent. But Mr Henning said councils should be in no doubt about their responsibilities. He said they are ultimately liable for what happens at an airport they own and control. "The government has no liability … [councils] have no idea they are at risk," he said. "They have to ensure they have enough public liability to save themselves." PHOTO: Most airports in regional Australia are operated by councils. (ABC South East NSW: Thomas Oriti) Mr Carmody agreed, but said a high level of cover is often too expensive for small councils. "[Councils], as the airport operator, they have responsibility for the performance and application of security measures at that airport, no different to the owners of Sydney airport or Brisbane airport," he said. He said there is some government involvement and airline involvement in maintaining standards and uniformity, but ultimately the council would bear the cost of a breach. "You would find although [regional councils] have insurance, it would be the absolute minimum cover of public liability. Why? Because they can't afford it," Mr Carmody said. How safe are you? However, John Coyne, a senior analyst of the border security program at Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said he does not think regional airports are more vulnerable than their larger city counterparts. With fewer flights and smaller communities that are aware of anything that is not as it should be, Mr Coyne said it could be argued the risk is lower in regional areas. Mr Coyne's view is security upgrades should only be linked to specific threat and said it is difficult to make anywhere completely secure. "Can you ever secure an airport? Yes. Don't let anyone go there or any packages be sent there," he said. "Everything else is a compromise."
  8. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    from today's australian CASA MOVES ON ANGEL FLIGHTS The Australian, Robyn Ironside – Friday 8th February 2019 Changes to community service flights by the Civil Aviation Safety Authority are expected to be made as early as next week, barely a fortnight after the period for submissions closed. The Australian understands widespread anger in regional and rural communities about the changes, has prompted CASA Chief Executive Shane Carmody to move quickly. All but one of the changes, relating to aircraft maintenance, are tipped to be part of a new CASA instrument that will be tabled in federal parliament. National not-for-profit operation Angel Flight has warned the changes could force it to stop helping rural people tavel to non-emergency medical appointments in cities. Chief Executive Majorie Pagani said the changes would require pilots to meet a higher standard than those already imposed by their CASA licence, in order to help others. But in an interview with ABC regional radio, CASA Chairman Tony Matthews said two fatal crashes involving Angel Flight gave CASA no choice but to review arrangements. “We had to go back in as CASA and see what level pilots should be at to be flying passengers around on technically what is not a private flight,” Mr Matthews said. “All the fuel is paid for, so we’re just looking at what level of safety that is suitable for what they’re actually doing.” A minimum level of flying experience would also be imposed, to ensure a “level of performance from the pilots that’s commensurate with what they’re doing”. “To some extent these flights put a little bit of pressure on you, in that you need to get people to their appointment or get them home. That puts pressure on the pilot,” said Mr Matthews. Ms Pagani said she would be surprised if CASA had even read all the 160 submissions made to the authority in response to the proposed changes
  9. fly_tornado

    Bolly

    can't you find some concrete?
  10. fly_tornado

    Forced Landing, Sunshine Coast

    lycomings failing after 20 years versus Jabirus dropping valves at 500 hours isn't a fair comparison
  11. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    disagreeing for the sake of disagreeing is a form of trolling Turbs
  12. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    I thought you loved researching? am I mistaken and do you only like disagreeing?
  13. you can't draw air from your 912's radiator?
  14. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    I don't know where to start, I just want you to present more accurate comparisons
  15. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    you need to compare apples to apples. can you dig up highway accidents per highway distance travelled, that's a more relevant comparison to just passenger vehicle deaths also can you dig up per 1000 deaths of passengers in road transit
  16. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    what is the accident rate for ambulances?
  17. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    Ambulances crash at a much higher rate than passenger vehicles, its just the nature of being alive everything has risk
  18. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    online drone training ie a multiple choice quiz in which the answers to all the questions will be available 30 minutes after the site goes live
  19. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    From CASA's perspective, the big problem now is the ever increasing masses of drones flying about that could cause a GA plane to crash, occam's razor suggests that grounding every nonessential GA plane is the simplest way to achieve that safety rating. Imagine how dangerous rural airports are going to be for GA aircraft when you have hundreds autonomous agricultural drones coming and going on a 24/7 basis. CASA will be held responsible for this situation.
  20. fly_tornado

    Wellcamp

    Originally Mathew and I disagreed about whether or not Wellcamp was a good idea, my original concern was that the Newman or Abbott govt was going to buy it off the Wagner family for $200m. This thread helped me to influence journalists I follow on facebook to write about Wellcamp. I don't care what Matthew thinks of me as a troll because he's jacked off because he's wrong about wellcamp, I know Mathew's ego will recover over time because he can't wrong forever. Sycophants are the worst though. But back to Wellcamp, I contacted some APN, WIN and ABC journos last year about doing a story on Wellcamp after the ABS released the traffic figures, not a single one of them followed up. I guess after 5 years no one is interested anymore.
  21. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    you always seem to have the wrong take on everything. CASA response to these 2 pilot error accidents is wrong as usual
  22. fly_tornado

    Can't turn, Can't climb, Can't run: F35 problems

    Oldest F-35B Could Hit Service Life Limit In 2026 Jan 30, 2019Steve Trimble | Aerospace Daily & Defense Report F-35B: USMC Structural defects mean the earliest F-35Bs delivered by Lockheed Martin could reach a service life limit by 2026 after 2,100 flight hours, according to the Pentagon’s director for weapons testing. The design specification of the F-35B called for a service life of 8,000 flight hours, but early production models fall “well under” the durability requirement, Robert Behler, director of operational test and evaluation (DOT&E,) wrote in his latest annual report to Congress. The new DOT&E assessment comes after several years of durability testing that exposed multiple structural cracks. Lockheed completed two service lifetime cycles of durability testing on a static F-35B airframe called BH-1, but canceled a plan in February 2017 to perform a third series. Structural redesigns, including a new approach for the wing-carry-through, had made BH-1 unrepresentative of the final production standard, the DOT&E report states. The F-35 program has obtained funding to acquire a new structural test article, but it was not yet on contract, the report adds. Bloomberg first reported the DOT&E’s findings on the F-35 program. “Items identified in the Annual DOT&E report are well understood and have been resolved in partnership with the F-35 Joint Program Office or have an agreed path forward to resolution,” Lockheed said in a statement to Aerospace DAILY. Planned design changes should allow the early F-35Bs to meet the service life requirement of 8,000 flight hours, a program source says. Lockheed also discontinued durability testing on a static test article for the F-35C last September instead of beginning a third life cycle assessment, the DOT&E said. The F-35A completed three full life cycles of durability testing, by contrast. Behler’s office also remains skeptical about the F-35 program’s decision to reorganize parts of the Block 4 modernization plan. Instead of rolling out large increments every two years, the Continuous Capability Development and Delivery plan adopted a year ago calls for releasing smaller software updates adding new features every six months. The six-month release cycle for the aircraft’s mission systems is not matched with the upgrade schedule for the F-35’s support systems, such as the Autonomic Logistics Information System, mission data and training simulators, Behler’s report states. The DOT&E is also critical about the readiness of the F-35’s Block 3F software a month after the program entered a critical testing phase. Software updates and fixes rolled out by Lockheed reduced the number of Category 1 deficiencies to 13 in December from more than 100 last May. The program later added two more Category 1 deficiencies to the list after the F-35 entered the initial operational test and evaluation phase on Dec. 5, the report states.
  23. https://medium.com/war-is-boring/test-pilot-admits-the-f-35-can-t-dogfight-cdb9d11a875 New stealth fighter is dead meat in an air battle by DAVID AXE A test pilot has some very, very bad news about the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The pricey new stealth jet can’t turn or climb fast enough to hit an enemy plane during a dogfight or to dodge the enemy’s own gunfire, the pilot reported following a day of mock air battles back in January. “The F-35 was at a distinct energy disadvantage,” the unnamed pilot wrote in a scathing five-page brief that War Is Boring has obtained. The brief is unclassified but is labeled “for official use only.”
  24. fly_tornado

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    I don't quite see the correlation between the crashes and the response? Neither plane suffered an engine failure
  25. fly_tornado

    Is the Drifter Group still active?

    time to get on the smokes and laxettes
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