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How many trikers are there in Aus???


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Hi everyone;

 

Just wondering, does anyone know how many trike pilots there are who regularly fly in Austraila? According to the Raaus website in 2006, there were only 130 registered trikes! Does this mean that there were only around 130 or more regular trike pilots in Aus in 2006? I thought there were alot more!

 

Regards: Giorgio.

 

 

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Guest MundooTriker

Hello Giorgio,

 

If thats the case, 2.3% of the triking population is in Innisfail FNQ.

 

By the end of the week we should be able to track them all down.

 

Andrew

 

 

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Hi everyone;

 

After a bit more searching and much reading, I discovered that many trikes are also registered with HGFA. The problem is, I haven't yet found out how many that is. However, it seems as though there may be much more with HGFA than with RAAUS. Based on a recent ministerial safety review the total figure may well be around the 500 or more mark?

 

Regards: Giorgio

 

 

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HGFA don't publish a list of trikes registered with them but, if its any help, the ratio here at YCAB is about 3:1 in their favour.

 

HGFA seem to be pretty much the default choice unless you fly 3-axis as well when the complications of 2 memberships, 2 BFR etc tend to make RAA a more practical choice.

 

There seems to be a trend of HGFA trike schools/instructors moving to RAA though so maybe the situation will change in the future.

 

What was the ministerial statement you mentioned ?

 

Cheers

 

John

 

 

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Hi John;

 

The ministerial safety review released in 2007 covers aviation in Australia from 2001 to 2005. It looks at all types of aviation including sport aircraft. However, it does not include crashes in this category as part of their analysis (due to lack of reliable crash data). The report is quite long but worth a look. You will find it here:

 

http://www.atsb.gov.au/publications/2007/pdf/aviation_safety_rev.pdf

 

It states that there were around 2000 aircraft in the ultralight category in 2004.It doesn't mention the number of microlights as I first thought (I must have read that somewhere else). Although it implies that the number of microlights is greater than the number of balloons (~350) as balloon operators are the smallest group. Based on your comments regarding the ratio of HGFA to RAA registered aircraft for ycab. A currrent figure of around 600 aircraft might be realistic.

 

Regards: Giorgio.

 

 

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As an HGFA trike pilot I do recall seeing a figure of about 1000 pilots flying about 600 trikes in Australia. That was a few years ago. Sometime around 2001 to 2003.

 

No idea how many were regular flyers though, and it was only HGFA and did not include RAA.

 

I also hold an RAAus pilot certificate for trikes. People like me might skew the statistics, in a good way.

 

 

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At Gawler there are around 8-10 trikes depending on which day you were to count. The majority of them are registered under RAA, and have been for around 3 -4 years. While this may be anomalous when comapred to the national picture the reason for most was the perception that:-

 

1) RAA had its sh*t in a pile, HGFA werent sure if they even had sh*t let alone where it was.

 

2) Some of us intended to fly weightshift and 3axis, for those pilots, HGFA becomes another place to throw money for no benefit.

 

3) Most could see that weightshift microlights had more in common with the general RAA fleet than the hangliders in HGFA, the void between could only grow as time goes past.

 

4) If the majority of trikes in any location are registered under one org then the ability to fly a particular machine to try its unique aspects is limited to who its registered with. RAA pilots canot fly HGFA registered Aircraft and vice versa.... As such if the majority are in one camp then its easier to justify being in the same camp.

 

Andy

 

 

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Also I think historically a lot of pilots got into trikes from hang-gliding whereas there are now an increasing number who take it up without that background (& even a few converts from 3-axis)

 

Re 4) I think there is some recognition of how nonsensical this rule is and maybe it will get changed.

 

Cheers

 

John

 

 

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HGFA vs RAA & Why?

 

Good topic boys.... Hey its been a long time since the rules where set out.. CAO 95.32, but back in 1987 the HORSCOTS Inquiry is where it all began for trikes and being legal.

 

In the beginning, the then AUF management (Rod Birrel & others) didn't want trikes in the AUF..., so Paul Mollison from Airborne, Trevor Burns CAA and yours truly came up with both AUF & HGFA as the administration bodies for weightshift aircraft. Seem'd logical and all agreed.!

 

Basically, at this time all trikes were mostly for aerotowing, and recreational trike flying was just beginning to be seen as a recreational sport. It was also a matter of all the right people in the one bed ..so to speak that made it possible for Airborne & the HGFA to dominate the Aussie trike industry...no apology made if anyone is offended - but it is the truth!

 

So it is today in our grand country of Australia, that we have this shamble of a system that is not absolutely transparent with certain problems that indirectly restrict the growth of our flexwing industry. In fact, we (Ossie's) would be the ONLY country in the world with TWO Federations to administer one sport aviation fraternity...!!

 

Insurance has been a major factor with HGFA having passenger liability up until just recently and the majority of flight schools are Airborne agents so the HGFA has been the preferred choice. Although, in 1996 I tested the water with the AUF and found that I could not fly my aircraft that were HGFA registered when all my pilots converted to the AUF, some machines had several months of HGFA rego left..but all aircraft had to be re-registered with the AUF for it to be legal to conduct flying operations ..a very expensive exercise at the time.!

 

It would make better sense in the management of all powered aircraft, to be administered under one Federation which would give us sound procedures for matters of importance to safety... ie. accident reports, flight training standards and of course aircraft registration certification acceptance & maintenance....!

 

So there you have it...those that created this problem with dual Federation Administration of weightshift controlled aeroplanes operating under CAO 95.32. It seem right at the time...!

 

My opinion of pilot numbers would be closer to just over 1000 or so...just an assumption!

 

Clear Air - Smooth Flights

 

Chris :yin_yan:

 

 

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