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JabFlyer01
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Great to have just found this site. Am building solo hrs in J160at Lilydale, Melbourne after getting RAAus cert. recently. Was googling people's thoughts on back to field for downwind landing vs outlanding after EFAT just after 1000 ft AGL. Fortunately hypothetical! Thoughts?

 

 

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Welcome to the forum 01.

 

If you have an EFATO after 1000ft you ought to be able to complete a smallish gliding circuit and land back on the departure strip into wind. You didn't do those in your training?

 

A recent discussion here will give you an idea of peoples' various thoughts about EFATO lower than that.

 

 

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Welcome to the forum 01.If you have an EFATO after 1000ft you ought to be able to complete a smallish gliding circuit and land back on the departure strip into wind. You didn't do those in your training?

 

A recent discussion here will give you an idea of peoples' various thoughts about EFATO lower than that.

Welcome to the forum 01.If you have an EFATO after 1000ft you ought to be able to complete a smallish gliding circuit and land back on the departure strip into wind. You didn't do those in your training?

 

A recent discussion here will give you an idea of peoples' various thoughts about EFATO lower than that.

Hi and thanks HIC, yep did lots of glide approaches (great fun) but always from downwind/short base abeam the threshold. A tight glide circuit from just over 1000agl seems like a good option. Especially in a headwind where not too much distance has been completed on climb, downwind is fast over te ground and there was some runway left before TO! Than ks for that interesting discussion link, really useful.

 

 

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Especially in a headwind where not too much distance has been completed on climb ...

From what you're saying here I assume you usually take off and climb straight ahead to 1000ft+ ? If you turn crosswind at 500ft you'd usually be in a far better/safer position in the event of EFATO after that point. This does vary according to the airfield and obstacles specific to the area of operation at the time but for example, if you were operating out of a strip cut out of a forest you'd do well to turn crosswind at 500ft and downwind shortly after that, then you'd be in a good position to complete the gliding circuit if the noise stops.

 

 

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From what you're saying here I assume you usually take off and climb straight ahead to 1000ft+ ? If you turn crosswind at 500ft you'd usually be in a far better/safer position in the event of EFATO after that point. This does vary according to the airfield and obstacles specific to the area of operation at the time but for example, if you were operating out of a strip cut out of a forest you'd do well to turn crosswind at 500ft and downwind shortly after that, then you'd be in a good position to complete the gliding circuit if the noise stops.

If I'm doing circuit practice I'll turn crosswind at 500ft (750 indicated) and yep then am usually abeam the strip pretty quickly. But if heading out to training area, usually climb to 1500 and turn right off R36 or left off R18. In both cases, we're lucky at YLIL that we have good landing spaces within 30 deg. But I'm going through the thought process of 'what if' in various situations, especially if around that 1000ft decision point do I still maintain runway heading or in what circumstances have I got safe margin to go back to the nice big runway? As I'm in that early low hrs solo phase - ie low esp but no instructor there to say "no power", am trying to ask myself those 'virtual instructor' questions! I just read that whole discussion thread too - really good stuff.

 

 

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This may help.

 

I practice engine failures at various heights and find that an imaginary mark just below the pitot tube inlet (on my plane) is a good indication of where I can glide to. Every point below this spot is within gliding distance.

 

For low wing aircraft, this spot could be the wing tip or thereabouts.

 

Try sometime to find your spot.

 

Phil.

 

 

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This may help.I practice engine failures at various heights and find that an imaginary mark just below the pitot tube inlet (on my plane) is a good indication of where I can glide to. Every point below this spot is within gliding distance.

For low wing aircraft, this spot could be the wing tip or thereabouts.

 

Try sometime to find your spot.

 

Phil.

Thanks for that Phil, good idea - will give that a go hopefully next w/end if weather improves.

 

 

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It's good to see that you're actively seeking knowledge to improve your performance in the event that things go wrong at some stage. Well done. Unfortunately we've had an unhealthy string of mishaps in the recent past, a good percentage of which might have been avoidable.

 

The following threads contain invaluable information among the general discussion, well worth reading, and feel free to add to the discussions if you like.

 

Turn Smart - starts with a video that EVERYONE should see. Understanding what this very experienced Ag pilot has to say, and applying it, will prevent becoming a statistic in the all-too-frequent base-to-final stall-spin scenario.

 

Va - Manoeuvring Speed - has some very useful information in it, about an often poorly taught and much misunderstood subject.

 

The above Va thread came about because of discussion about the consequences of inadvertent flight into VMC which was possibly the cause of the recent Barossa Valley crash - this tragic thread is a good heads-up about taking extra care where foggy/low cloud conditions exist or may develop.

 

Do Vortex Generators Really Work? Is interesting if you have a curiosity about STOL and/or design for spin resistance.

 

 

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