Jump to content

okgood

Members
  • Content Count

    10
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About okgood

  • Rank
    Member

Information

  • Aircraft
    Non-Pilot
  • Location
    Colorado
  • Country
    USA
  1. A United Boeing 757-200, registration N18112 performing flight UA-1871 from Newark,NJ (USA) to Los Angeles,CA (USA) with 168 passengers and 6 crew, was climbing out of Newark’s runway 22R when the crew stopped the climb at 2500 feet reporting engine (RB211) problems and requesting “vectors around here” further advising they had a compressor stall on the right hand engine. The crew subsequently advised they were running the checklists for single engine, the crew declared emergency. The aircraft landed safely back on Newark’s runway 22R about 37 minutes after departure.
  2. A China Airlines Boeing 747-400 freighter (flight CI-5107) from San Francisco to Taipei with 7 crew, was in the initial climb out of San Francisco's runway 28R, when just upon contacting departure and receiving instructions from ATC for further climb the crew declared PAN PAN PAN reporting a bird strike, that had taken out some of their flight instruments. The aircraft stopped the climb at 6000 feet, the crew indicated they were still considering how to proceed, there were no procedures for the faults. The crew decided to dump fuel and return to San Francisco (KSFO). The aircraft landed safely
  3. That's a good thing; it was handled very professionally ?
  4. Although this incident occurred nearly one month ago, I thought this forum community may be interested in it. Qantas Flight 575 was climbing out of Sydney on December 15, 2019 when the crew received indication of a hydraulic leak, stopped the climb at FL230, and returned to Sydney for a safe landing on runway 34L about 45 minutes after departure. About 20 minutes later the aircraft was towed to the apron. Already on the apron mist began to reduce visibility in the cabin, passengers began to complain about sore eyes and itchy throats. Once the tow stopped at the stand, the captain initiated
  5. CHICAGO, Illinois -- On Thursday, 2 January 2020, an Atlas Air Boeing 747-400 Flight 5Y-551 (Giant 551 Heavy) from New York's JFK airport to Chicago O'Hare was in the initial descent through FL320 towards Chicago when the crew reported they just had to shut down their number 2 engine. They did not declare an emergency. ATC told the crew they declared an emergency for them instead. The aircraft landed safely on Chicago's runway 28C about 40 minutes after reporting the engine failure. Is it normal for ATC to declare the emergency in lieu of the pilot?
  6. 50 Tons of Fuel Dumped over Zurich - Edelweiss Flight 24 ZURICH, Switzerland - On Wednesday, 1 January 2020, an Edelweiss Air Airbus A340-300 Flight 24 from Zurich to Cancun was climbing out of Zurich's runway 16 when the crew stopped the climb due to an abnormal indication for engine number 3 - which later turned out to be a false indication. The crew shut the engine down, dumped 50 tons of fuel, and returned to Zurich for a safe landing on runway 16. The aircraft remained on the ground for another 1.5 hours, then departed again and reached Cancun with a delay of about 3.5 hours. W
  7. I agree. When I was flying out of Austin, Texas in my little Cessna 150, 152 or 172, I would routinely depart behind 737s (and larger). I would also routinely get a "caution wake turbulence" warning from the Tower. As a result, I would always make sure I was airborne well before the point the preceding jet took off, plus ensure I was climbing faster, plus make sure I was turning slightly upwind (the opposite direction of where the wake turbulence was drifting). Even with this, one time my flight instructor and I hit what we assumed was wake turbulence because it was a really violent jolt that
  8. Was wake turbulence a factor in ? What do you think? ASHEVILLE, North Carolina - On Saturday, December 28, 2019, a Piper PA-32RT crashed approximately one-quarter mile east of the airport as it was taking off from Runway 17, and was partially consumed by fire adjacent to the Asheville Regional Airport, Asheville, North Carolina. Thankfully, all five people on board were able to exit the plane and were not seriously injured, according to an Emergency Services spokesman. The Piper took off immediately following American Airlines flight 5319. The Air Traffic Control Tower warned the Piper
  9. Agreed. I learned in a high-wing, so the fuel was gravity fed from both tanks, but even on my emergency checklist there was a step to ensure the fuel selector switch was turned to BOTH. I realize he may not have had much time, especially if the engine quit at low altitude, but from the report it seems he didn't switch the tank at all during his touch-and-go practice at some other airport.
  10. It seems like a design flaw to me, to have to remember to switch fuel tanks every 30 minutes. What do you think? VERO BEACH, Florida - On December 2, 2019, a Piper PA28 Warrior, N558PU, was substantially damaged during a forced, student pilot emergency landing in a field. The student pilot was not injured. The pilot departed VRB earlier in the day for a solo, cross-country flight. He took off from VRB with full fuel tanks and landed uneventfully at another airport. He intended to switch fuel tanks one hour into the flight, contrary to the flight school's policy of every 30 minutes. He forgo
×
×
  • Create New...