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Any Info re: "Airdrome Aeroplanes" 1st War Replica Sopwith Kits (USA)


Riley
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I am looking with great interest at a couple of the abv-ref company's 2-place, full scale replicas (Baby and/or Schneider) as suitable and interesting carriages upon which to hang my Rotec R2800 radial engine.

 

I'm advised that there are a number of their kit replica aircraft both in the air and in construction currently in Oz. Accordingly I would very much like to communicate with any and all Forumites who are either flying or building any 'Airdrome Aeroplane' kits or have knowledge of any one who is. I'll be back in OZ on 4th Sept and would welcome any contact. Thanks in advance. Cheers Riley

 

 

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Hi Riley,

 

I am also looking to build an Airdrome Sopwith Pup, so have one or two contacts.

 

Firstly, TAVAS founder Andrew Carter, who has a Fokker Triplane - see www.tavas.com.au for contact details.

 

Secondly, there are a number of people who have both completed or are currently building Airdrome kits at Watts Bridge. Bruce Clarke has a Sopwith Pup, and

 

I believe is now building a Nieuport. Others have a Fokker Eindekker, and Sopwith Camel under construction.

 

If you PM me (ie start a "conversation" ) I can give you emails (but don't want to put them here in public threads).

 

Good luck!

 

Neil

 

 

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Hi Riley,I am also looking to build an Airdrome Sopwith Pup, so have one or two contacts.

 

Firstly, TAVAS founder Andrew Carter, who has a Fokker Triplane - see www.tavas.com.au for contact details.

 

Secondly, there are a number of people who have both completed or are currently building Airdrome kits at Watts Bridge. Bruce Clarke has a Sopwith Pup, and

 

I believe is now building a Nieuport. Others have a Fokker Eindekker, and Sopwith Camel under construction.

 

If you PM me (ie start a "conversation" ) I can give you emails (but don't want to put them here in public threads).

 

Good luck!

 

Neil

Thanks Neil. I'll PM you. cheers Riley

 

 

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I've just started a 75% Fokker Dr1 with a fellow enthusiast (ex-RAAF test pilot and multiple builder). The plans are pretty basic but adequate so far (we've only got the empennage "kit"). If you look at his YouTube videos that show his construction techniques, you may cringe a little. His techniques are not always in accordance with common practices. Also, his plans are not "exact". Dimensions can be "close enough" rather than exact.

 

We are also doing some modifications to the construction along the way that we feel will provide a more sound structure. In places, he has pop rivets in tension, rather than shear so the pop rivets are just waiting to be pulled out... etc.

 

Here's our rudder after a few hours (Robert Baslee only takes around one hour to do what we did in 3 hours, but we were somewhat pedantic about our holes, alignment, deburring, radiusing ends etc..

 

image.jpg.1620e868d3d694e5a9f764d108b6f504.jpg

 

Anyway, construction is very easy and straightforward, indeed, is quite enjoyable, especially when there are two of you on the job.

 

Unfortunately, unless you are passing through the Middle East, you won't be able to view our project...

 

 

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I've just started a 75% Fokker Dr1 with a fellow enthusiast (ex-RAAF test pilot and multiple builder). The plans are pretty basic but adequate so far (we've only got the empennage "kit"). If you look at his YouTube videos that show his construction techniques, you may cringe a little. His techniques are not always in accordance with common practices. Also, his plans are not "exact". Dimensions can be "close enough" rather than exact.We are also doing some modifications to the construction along the way that we feel will provide a more sound structure. In places, he has pop rivets in tension, rather than shear so the pop rivets are just waiting to be pulled out... etc.

 

Here's our rudder after a few hours (Robert Baslee only takes around one hour to do what we did in 3 hours, but we were somewhat pedantic about our holes, alignment, deburring, radiusing ends etc..

 

[ATTACH=full]31787[/ATTACH]

 

Anyway, construction is very easy and straightforward, indeed, is quite enjoyable, especially when there are two of you on the job.

 

Unfortunately, unless you are passing through the Middle East, you won't be able to view our project...

Much appreciate your response FV. Had viewed the previous thread on your project but didn't associate it with Airdrome Aeroplanes. Am I correct in thinking you are scratch-building from plans rather than assembling one of Baslee's kits? Given that I can make enough mistakes on my own without any possible 'built -in' anomolies, if some of his dimensions are 'approximates' I'm immediately gunshy. Hopefully other Forumites will fill me in on all plus and minus factors. Good luck with your undertaking and thanks again for your input. cheers Riley

 

 

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We are building from one of Baslee's "kits". The kit simply consists of aluminium tubing cut to approximate length. Each tube is identified with a sticker which is referred to in the plans. The aluminium sheet gussets are cut to shape and the hinges are included. So the "kit" is quite complete, but at first glance will appear to be a pile of raw materials.

 

An example of the "approximate" ethos is with the shape of the rudder bow. Baslee gives a rough sketch and says close enough is ok, it doesn't have to be an exact shape. In this sense, it makes things a little easier for you as the builder. Also, the ribs that you can see on my rudder above can be moved up or down from their planned location with no detriment to the structure, so he says that there's no need to measure to the .1mm to position the ribs.

 

As a first time builder with low or no construction experience, you will pick up the skills very quickly to be able to build one of Baslee's kits. It is measuring, marking, sawing, filing, drilling, deburring, bending, assembling, checking for fit, etc.. You will find the construction technique easy after you have built the rudder to start with.

 

The advice I would give would be to spend a day or two with someone who is building one of these aircraft and lend a hand. It will give you some experience and confidence to tackle your own kit.

 

 

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