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I have nearly used all the T88 epoxy supplied with my MiniMax kit, so need more glue.

 

T88 is eye-wateringly expensive in Oz, so I will use WEST epoxy. I have used 105/205 before, and I actually prefer it to T88, esp when modified with fillers.

 

But I see WEST have now introduced G-Flex, which is more flexible than the 105 resin system. It, too, is much more expensive, but of course only represents a tiny percentage of the build cost.

 

So my question is, has anyone used G-Flex & 105/205 - 6, and if so, any observations? Should I go for the more flexible product, or is this unecessary/undesirable?

 

All input gratefully received.

 

Bruce

 

 

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It's been awhile since I did my research on adhesives, but somewhere along the way I came to the conclusion (as you probably have also) that adhesive manufacturers are pretty sharp with marketing techniques. They tend not to report data on their products in the same way their competitors do, obviously making it difficult for a consumer to make a direct comparison with other products on the market.

 

I'm using Techniglue on my Himax project. Not sure if you've given it a thought - It's relatively cheap, quite forgiving with it's gap-filling properties and I believe you can buy two different speed hardeners for it these days. It is also readily available around here.

 

I've used T88 and the Bote-Cote products in other projects and found Techniglue to be as good as, if not better, to use. It doesn't come with a MIL spec like T88 (which gives some people that warm fuzzy feeling), but it's more than adequate for the application. My Dad built the fuselage and empennage of my Himax project using Techniglue and there is absolutely no sign of degradation in the glue joints after some 15 years of it being stored in a tin shed, in a temperate climate. Some slight yellowing of the epoxy which is to be expected, but it's held up well, as have the test pieces that were made up with each batch of glue.

 

The proof is in the pudding for me.

 

 

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They tend not to report data on their products in the same way their competitors do, obviously making it difficult for a consumer to make a direct comparison with other products on the market.

 

I'm using Techniglue on my Himax project. Not sure if you've given it a thought - It's relatively cheap, quite forgiving with it's gap-filling properties and I believe you can buy two different speed hardeners for it these days. It is also readily available around here.

 

The proof is in the pudding for me.

 

Hi Yes your right about the comparison makes it very difficult.

 

I have been using T88 but Techniglue sounds interesting. Does it mix up as a thick liquid like T88 or more like a paste?

 

The cost of T88 by an Australian supplier is a total ripoff compared to costs from US suppliers.

 

 

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Be careful if you assume that Mil-spec means better .....it doesn't unless you know what the Mil-spec actually is.....its the same as saying "built to a standard!" unless you know what the standard is, and its appropriateness to your needs its just marketing fluff.......There have been aircraft manufacturers locally who built to a standard....and when people/organisations/regulators understood what that standard was they were grounded!

 

 

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I've solved my dilemma by just buying some more T88 from Spruce in the States. Although the shipping was around $45, I ordered several goodies from them (all much cheaper or just not obtainable in Oz) to share the postage.

 

I have no idea why T88 - or so many other aviation related products - should cost SO much more over here, but I for one will not be suckered into paying inflated prices. If I can buy a one-off item from a retailer for substantially less than the asking price in Australia, then why would I buy locally?

 

I have no sympathy with retailers crying foul over foreign competition. They're just too bloody greedy.

 

Bruce

 

 

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My description of Techniglue's consistency would be: a bit less paste like than toothpaste. Perhaps like yogurt. Or good old Araldite mixed with some micro balloons (or sawdust). It's good at filling gaps and not running out of joints.

 

I guess the noteworthy thing about being 'built to a standard' - and carrying a MIL spec - is that you have a baseline. In general, MIL spec on aeroplane glue is a bit of a Furphy, but I would much rather repair a certified aeroplane with glue that has a MIL spec than one that doesn't. Especially when it comes to the regulatory authorities. I certainly wouldn't consider using Resorcinol in this day and age.

 

Cheers

 

 

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