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ballistic parachutes


Guest PeterMJ
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Guest PeterMJ

this topic has probably been raised before, or someone out there may have gone through this experience - what are the logistics of having a ballistic chute retrofitted to a factory built plane (ie cost, finding a chute distributor, having it fitted)?

 

 

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Guest Baphomet

My experience: I bought a Galaxy chute 2nd hand (unused) and had it re-packed at the factory I sent photos of my aircraft and dimensions of the fuselage tube to the factory, and they fabricated a mount. Michael Coates of X-air was the distributor, but I'm not sure of the current arrangements. Send me a PM and I'll tell you all about Michael's notion of service. Anyway, things you need to consider

 

1. Canopy size (depends on weight of aircraft)

 

2. Opening speed rating

 

3. COG (placement)

 

4. Type (external or internal).

 

If you go to the site,

 

GALAXY HICH TECHNOLOGY

 

There is a lot of info available and you should be able to detirmine the model you require pretty easily.

 

If you are buying new, or getting a re-pack on a 2nd hand chute, be aware that they travel as DANGEROUS GOODS and if coming by air, will cost a fortune in freight.

 

Current cost of a model to suit a two-place rag and tube is about $5,500 I believe (new)

 

I imagine all of the above would apply equally to BRS

 

I consider it to be cheap insurance.

 

 

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I'd like to hear what that testpilot from the Skycatcher accident has to say about them. good thing he had a plan B to fall back on.

 

 

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Guest PeterMJ

i gather you're referring to the skycatcher spin in US last month. I agree, it's always good to have a plan B, no matter how many safety margins are put in place to fly safely.

 

 

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Guest PeterMJ

you mentioned that the factory constructed a mount, so I gather that means you installed the rest - straight forward? as for cog - what is the average weight of these things?

 

 

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Guest Baphomet

Yes, the repack includes new bridles. The chute weighs 11kg. If you are unsure how to mount it, the factory will assist. There are several mounting solutions provided on the website. The key to this, is to mount it on a sturdy part(s) of the airframe that won't tear away when the chute opens.

 

 

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Guest basscheffers
I'd like to hear what that testpilot from the Skycatcher accident has to say about them. good thing he had a plan B to fall back on.

Did they mention anything about it in the crash reports? Good chance it wasn't even installed on this pre-production prototype!

 

 

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yes it was fitted and the pilot activated it, this is what the witness reported as sparks coming from the aircraft. to venture into that area of speculation the rocket may have miss fired or maybe the deployment was hampered by the spin condition acting on the aircraft. reps from the manufactuers of the recovery system went to the crash site the day of the accident. apparently the pilot had a very short canopy ride. be interesting to read the full report on both the spin condition, and the failed deployment of the recovery system..

 

ozzie

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

I was just wondering if anyone has tried to import, buy, get a quote for a chute from one or any of the 3 suppliers of them?? I'm keen to get one one the way I have emailed them all so far and not one response.. Has been quite a while as well,,Have emailed twice and rang once our AU dealer for the GRS with about the same result.

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

I purchased a Second Chantz non-rocket , morter type system for my home built Biplane when I was living in the States, late eighties. I remember waiting about 2 months to put the cash together for it US$900 at the time. Fustrating as the plane was ready to go, but I had promised the cook that I would put one on. Flew with it for around ten years, and I still have it sitting in the garage. It would need a repack by now. It was the last check prior to putting the throttle foward, chute handle-check.

 

Many had balistic chutes fitted in those earlier days, only two brands then BRS and Second Chantz. Engines and airframes wern't as sturdy as they are now.

 

We would often talk about them and decided they would be used for the following reasons...structural failure and control system failure. A close third was engine failure over real bad country which then might give you a better arrival.

 

In ten years of flying over there I saw one ballistic chute deployed, and it was accidently deployed on the runway during a backtrack, which was very embarrising for the owner. There was not much he could do as it was windy, and he had this fully deployed chute hanging out the back!!. We had to go and grab the chute and rescue him. Actually make that two, as I did see a fully deployed chute laying on the ground after a doube fatal Rans S-12 accident. We couldn't work out wether it had deployed at impact, or at the last moment. The unfortunate pilot did have his hand on the chute handle, but the chute was strung out to one side in an undeployed condition, so we figured it probabily went off at impact. They were saving a life or two each month back then in the US.

 

The idea of the rocket being bought in was because once the morter energy was used IE: hitting a broken wing on the way out, it didn't go any further. The rocket systems could be conceled inside the fuselage and blast out through a weakened blast panel. Theoretacely it could also keep going through a broken wing, and still deploy. Did see a bloke loose a couple of fingers when a rocket deployed accidently in his hanger, as he was fitting it. Took two fingers clean off !. It was his fault, and the rocket also made a pretty good dent in the hangar wall iron as I recall.

 

They were always mounted so that they fired down at an angle, and back.

 

I am happy to have never used mine but it was there in case. I don't really feel the Lightwing I fly now requires one..............................................................................024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

 

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Hi Brett,

 

I imported 3 BRS units a few years ago. If I remember correctly it was through their Aus. agent who was also the agent for, I believe, Bantam aircraft. Freight was quite expensive as there had to be special packing for the rockets to allow them to be carried as airfreight. Had a few contacts with BRS direct & they required a photo of the completed installation to satisfy themselves that it had been done correctly. All in all it was a fairly easy process.

 

Rgds Pete

 

 

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