Jump to content

old man emu

Members
  • Content Count

    2,677
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    22

old man emu last won the day on January 20

old man emu had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1,906 Excellent

About old man emu

  • Rank
    Well-Known Member
  • Birthday March 18

More Information

  • Gender
    male
  • Location
    Narellan Vale, New South Wales,
  • Country
    Australia

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. old man emu

    FLARM

    I'm pretty sure that something like FLARM was fitted to the tugs at the Southern Cross Gliding Club at Camden
  2. old man emu

    ME 262 Sturmvogel - Was Hitler correct?

    Don't forget that Galland was a fighter pilot. His military thinking was aligned with the job he was trained to do - shoot down enemy aircraft of all types. I have said that I agree that the ME 262 was a dog, but that's not the discussion here. The discussion is, "Was the ME 262, due to its speed and low numbers, better used as an army support, hit and run weapon than as one of the many aircraft trying to dam the bomber streams?"
  3. old man emu

    ME 262 Sturmvogel - Was Hitler correct?

    I concede that the ME 262 had problems arising from the power output of its engines. My point is not to discuss the operational failings of the aircraft that finally came into operation too late and too few to stem the tsunami of Allied air superiority. The point I'd like to raise was whether or not Hitler's own desire to use this new form of ultra-fast aircraft as hit and run ground support units for surface forces was stupid, as the writers of History would have us believe, or was actually a smart idea in view of the Luftwaffe's loss of the control of the air over battlefields. Hitler was in the thick of things during World War One. He would have gained knowledge of the effect of aircraft on advancing troops from being under attack from them. Come WWII, Hitler was seeing that the anti-bomber campaign of the Luftwaffe was not effective. Everyone and his dog (Hitler's German Shepherd bitch, Blondi included) knew that there would be an invasion from the West. Since other fighter aircraft he had in greater numbers could still be directed at the bomber streams, the smaller numbers of the fast ME 262 might reasonably be more effective as support for ground troops.
  4. The fighter-bomber version of the German ME 262 was known as the Sturmvogel (Storm Bird). It has long been said that the Luftwaffe had the advantage of this jet-powered aircraft stifled by Hitler's stupidity in demanding that the new aircraft type be produced as a fighter-bomber. But was the idea stupid in theory? Germany's first jet-powered aircraft, the Heinkel He 178 took its maiden flight about a week before the invasion of Poland in 1939. As a result, the Me 262 was already under development as Projekt 1065 (P.1065) before the start of World War II. The project originated with a request by the Ministry of Aviation for a jet aircraft capable of one hour's endurance and a speed of at least 850 km/h (530 mph; 460 kn). Dr Waldemar Voigt headed the design team, with Messerschmitt's chief of development, Robert Lusser, overseeing. The Germans had the design of the airframe well in hand, but the engine technology hindered progress. One particularly acute problem arose with the lack of an alloy with a melting point high enough to endure the high temperatures involved, a problem that by the end of the war had not been adequately resolved. The aircraft made its first successful flight entirely on jet power on 18 July 1942, powered by a pair of Jumo 004 engines. In mid-1943, Adolf Hitler envisioned the Me 262 as a ground-attack/bomber aircraft rather than a defensive interceptor. The configuration of a high-speed, light-payload Schnellbomber("fast bomber") was intended to penetrate enemy airspace during the expected Allied invasion of France. Previously, the Stuka, was the designated ground support aircraft, but it could only be effective in areas where the Allies had air superiority by having the covering support of the ME 109 or FW 190. It was clear that if the Allies intended to invade, they would have the air superiority, and the Stuka operations would be cut to pieces. In light of that expectation, the idea of an aircraft able to support ground troops by entering a battlefield at high speed; making its attack, and then getting out at speed seems reasonable. Following the Allied invasion of France, US P47 Thunderbolt and the British Hawker Tempest carried out the role of fighter/bomber, ground support. This role was the same as envisaged for the Sturmvogel, and it would have been a great asset as the Germans tried to hold the Allies' ground forces advancing from East and West. Admittedly, Germany was having Hell bombed out of it by day and night. That restricted production of all aircraft, but about 1400 were built (17,000 ME 109 in 1944/45). Losses of ME 262s mostly occurred becasue they were set upon by Allied aircraft during take off or landing at their bases. These attacks meant that other fighter aircraft had to provide airborne protection during the beginning and end of ME 262 sorties. History records that the actual operational success of the ME 262 Sturmvogel was not outstanding, due to the overwhelming air superiority of the Allies. But should History also mock Hitler's vision of a high speed, ground attack aircraft that could have supported German ground troops as they tried to stop the rolling Allied juggernaut?
  5. That implies that it takes a woman 12 years to master the art of making a successful forced landing in a Tiger Moth. Aren't you getting sick and tired of inappropriate gender stereotyping? Was she suffering from PMT? PMT: Probable Motor Trouble
  6. John Coyne, a senior analyst of the border security program at Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said "Can you ever secure an airport? Yes. Don't let anyone go there or any packages be sent there," Not wishing to denigrate this man, but his realistic assessment of airport security would bode him well to be a member of the CASA board, as long as he would agree with CASA's belief that keeping aircraft from using airports would also enhance security.
  7. old man emu

    New member looking for recomendations

    PM montmartz. He operates out of Jaspers Brush.
  8. old man emu

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    I've suggested this before in other threads which were discussing CASA's inhibiting of light aircraft use for non-commercial purposes, but why don't we write to Senator Hanson and seek her support in bringing CASA stupidity before Parliament. Now, don't let's get started attacking or defending Senator Hanson's many political ideas. That is not the point here. Senator Hanson is a duly elected Senator for Queensland. As such, her role is to monitor Federal government policies so that the people of Queensland are not shafted. By extension, she can provide this service to the people of the other States ans Territories. It is a fact that Senator Hanson has the experience of using light aircraft as an efficient means of transport to meet the people in places where commercial realities prevent the provision of Regular Public Transport air services. We should exploit her experience in this area to raise the subject of CASA's heavy-handedness in this volunteer activity, and to force Parliament, or at least, the Senate, to investigate CASA's stand. OME
  9. old man emu

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    My wife finished a course of 33 radiation therapy treatments last Monday. She had one treatment each day (Weekends and Public Holidays excluded). She could not drive because she was receiving morphine for pain relief. Fortunately, most of out appointments were for before 9:00am, and the trip from door to door took about 25 minutes. Still, from the time we woke up until we got back home, we spent about 3-4 hours of the day. You have to either be a country resident, or have family members in the country to understand how distance adversely impacts on getting medical treatment. While the wife was undergoing her course of treatment, we met people who had to drive about an hour each way, each day to get their treatment. And these people lived in the nearby Southern Highlands. Imagine if you worked in a mining town like Cobar or Parkes and had to travel to a major city like Dubbo or Orange to see a Specialist or get treatment. Also, Specialists don't live in places like Dubbo, Orange, Wagga or Tamworth. They live in the Eastern Suburbs and take the morning flight out of Kingsford-Smith (if there is one). I can't see the difference between a person undergoing a course of treatment which does not require a hospital stay, flying in a aircraft maintained to the standards required by CASA, and a group of friends flying in the same aircraft from a rural location to a metropolitan airport in order for them to attend a football or cricket match.
  10. old man emu

    Fuel Bladder

    I thought it said Full Bladder
  11. old man emu

    New member looking for recomendations

    Don't forget Dubbo for an overnight and visit to Western Plains Zoo. Or you could fly into Narromine for a look around, then see if you can hire a car to go to the Zoo at Dubbo. Any flight down the coast to Moruya on a nice day is great. See if Jaspers Brush has the strip length for your plane. A visit to Temora is also on the Must Do list.
  12. old man emu

    The Day the Music Died.

    Sometimes the needle on an analog instrument will continue to move in the direction of the "vehicle" at the pre-impact speed as items, such as the face of the gauge, come to a stop. (Inertia - Newton's First Law of Motion) When the needle hits the face of the gauge it can leave an imprint, especially if the backside of the needle is painted. It is a pretty rare occurrence, but is has been observed. The problem with using these marks to determine pre-impact readings is that an "accurate" reading depends on the direction of the impact force. If the force is applied directly along the longitudinal axis of the vehicle, then the reading is pretty accurate. However, if the impact force is applied at an angle to the longitudinal axis , then the needle will be deflected in the direction of the impact force. If the impact force comes from the right of the longitudinal axis then the needle will deflect to the right. If at pre-impact, the needle at the 12 o'clock position and was pointing upwards, then an impact from the right would result in a mark between 12 and 1 o'clock. From the report of the Holly crash, one could assume that at impact, the aircraft was in a rotating descent. Therefore, the impact force would be expected to be coming from the side of the longitudinal axis. That would cause a wise investigator to note the position of any needle mark, but only conclude, at best, that the gauge was working at the time of impact.
  13. In light aircraft operated mostly in Day VMC conditions below 10,000 ft, the biggest destroyers of wheel bearings are water and grit which are thrown up from the ground surface when the wheels are in contact with it. To extend the life of the bearings, it is advisable to remove them for servicing every 100 hours or at a minimum, annually. Service the bearings more often if the aircraft is operated from unsealed runways. Servicing involves washing all the grease and muck from them in an solvent bath. After drying with a blast of air they must be packed with grease. A word of CAUTION. While it is fun to put the bearing on your thumb and get it to spin by blowing pressurized air across the outer shell, the friction generated if the bearing is dry can cause damage. Here's some advice on choosing a grease suitable for light aircraft wheel bearings: https://www.skylinkintl.com/blog/wheel-bearing-grease This is how to properly pack grease into a bearing: https://www.google.com/search?q=how+to+pack+a+bearing+with+grease&rlz=1C1GGRV_enAU749AU749&oq=how+to+pack+a+bearing&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l5.8460j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#kpvalbx=1
  14. Today, 3rd February 2019 is the sixtieth anniversary of the Day the Music Died. http://www.kcbd.com/2019/02/01/lubbock-remembers-buddy-holly-th-anniversary-day-music-died/ Here's the investigation report: https://fiftiesweb.com/music/crash-report/
  15. old man emu

    CASA set to "fix" community service flights

    Gees. I'm glad that I hold an authority from Transport New South Wales to drive a public passenger vehicle, and a licence from NSW Roads and Maritime Services to drive heavy vehicle combinations. It's a relief to know that my wife will have a perfectly safe 15-minute, each way trip to the hospital for her radiation treatment. I wonder how all those other husbands and wives drive their relatives to the hospital for treatment. The drivers can't all have the government permissions that I do. Maybe they use Uber drivers?
×