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Training: 2 Different Types?


Guest beachbob
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Guest beachbob

I would appreciate some advice. I only have about 6 hours of dual in recreational aircraft. Most of it has been in the CTsw with an hour or so in the CZAW SportCruiser. When I'm in the CTsw I spend more time worrying about landing it than flying it. (Truth be told so does the instructor!) The flight school only has the two sport airplanes and the SportCruiser is about twice as popular so it is more difficult to get it. Should I just wait for it and stretch out my learning or would it be okay to also fly the CTsw when the other plane is not available? Does learning on 2 different types make you a better pilot, worse pilot or no difference at all? I could ask my instructor who is a terrific young person but I don't know how those poor folks (flight instructors) make enough money to live on as it is. If it were me, I sure would be prone to give whatever answer would put me in the air, and thus on the payroll, the most. Thank you. Bob

 

 

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G'day Bob.

 

Thats a tricky question.. I havn't flown either type so im a bit limited for a good answer.. There's a lot to be said for recency.. You WILL learn faster (per flying hour) with recency. So flying as soon as possible after your last lesson is a good thing, provided youve had time to soak it in.. BUT.... trying to learn on 2 different types.. im not sure weather that would really help you or not.. Personally, i think staying on the one type is the better option, especially if the 2 types are quite different..

 

Ive had a guy go off through the week when he couldn't get us, to fly with someone else on a diff type Jab, and he didnt really get anywhere for a while, till i saw his logbook and worked out what was going on...he stopped flying with the other mob and was solo a week later...

 

sorry i havnt been much help..perhaps someone who instructs on both these types would be better placed to answer propperly..

 

cheers..

 

 

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Guest TOSGcentral

Flying different types for just experience is great prior to starting training and then for broadening experience post certificate.

 

During training you must, if at all possible, remain on the same type. You cannot efficiently (read cost effectively) obtain repetitive manual and judgemental skills if the response base is being constantly changed. Just the day to day changing airmass is challenge enough.

 

Reading between the lines mate - get yourself another instructor that you do feel OK with across the board. Probably stick to the CT as it appears to be the least in demand so can give you more continuity more readily. It may or may not be more difficult (I have not flown one) but if it is more challenging then you will be a better pilot. Or change schools!

 

Aye

 

Tony

 

 

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For me I would stick to one aircraft (importantly pick the instructor you relate to best).

 

You don't need to be overloading yourself with different instruments, speeds & instructors during your early learning.

 

Once you are up to speed (solo) then maybe branch out a little to experience a different approach to instruction & the ability to now accept a new aircraft without the mental load of just learning to fly.

 

Have fun

 

Cheers

 

H

 

 

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So far in my training (16hrs) I have flown 2 different aircraft solo, and 5 different aircraft while training. I have flown at 4 different airports (including every single runway at archerfield).

 

I didn't go solo till 14hrs training time. I believe this could have been lessened by about 4 hours if I was only flying one aircraft. I was appreciative of the ability to try a different aircraft but after a while it got beyond a joke (hence a change in schools). Unfortunately changing schools I had to leave behind a fantastic instructor.

 

I believe the different aircraft gave me a good understanding of flight but i don't want to change that much. I say stick with one as much as possible to start with. It will save you $$$ and time.

 

 

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Optimum..

 

You would be better off if you flew one aircraft in the early stages of training, and you would progress more quickly You are more loaded up with just coping with the other variables then, but if everything else is beaut, then just put up with it. Long-term you will be a better pilot for having experience over a wide variety of aircraft and you will develop more flexibility, but If you only want to fly one type of aircraft you could be very good at that, and that is enough. Depends where you want to end up.. Nev..

 

 

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i was thinking the same thing, keep on 1 type until you have learnt to fly, only once flying becomes almost second nature, and you no longer have to put so much concentration into the hands on flying, then you might consider a second type.

 

 

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