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rgmwa

First Class Member
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rgmwa last won the day on February 16 2019

rgmwa had the most liked content!

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About rgmwa

  • Rank
    Well-known member

More Information

  • Aircraft
    Vans RV-12
  • Location
    YSEN
  • Country
    Australia
  1. Saw a new ad on TV last night. Parents with a couple of young kids towing a big caravan. They arrive wherever they were going and the young boy, who has been playing with his electronic games gizmo in the car on the way up hops out. A bored looking young girl already at the campsite looks enviously at the gadget in his hand and next minute she has the spare hand controller and they are both playing this interactive game - which of course was the point of the ad - to show that you can play this game even when camping I thought it was a bit sad. When we took our kids camping, the whole point was being in the bush or at the beach.
  2. Probably never. They'll call it something else and hope the passengers don't notice where they painted over the old name.
  3. Thanks Downunder and Cosmick. I bought a second one from Anaconda so I've done OK overall. I thought BCF's price was reasonable, so I'm not comfortable trying to get my $40 back just because I could have done better elsewhere. Caveat emptor as the Romans used to say. KR - Both my Marlin 150;s have a whistle and a backup inflation tube. I'm GA and don't know about a TSO, but as long as they do the job that's good enough for me. Old Koreelah - I borrowed a couple of jackets for my last trip to Rotto. They were airline type in sealed plastic bags, which is OK if you're above 2,000 feet as legally you don't need to wear them, just have them available. But just try and put them on in a cramped cockpit on your way down from 2,000 feet in an emergency, or in the water after the crash, and see how you get on. At least with these I can put them on before taking off. Cheap insurance. I do have a top tier aviation life jacket (ex oil and gas industry) which has a re-breather unit that would allow me to stay underwater for up to 10 minutes, but it's bulky and without training I wouldn't like my chances. I'd wear it crossing Bass Strait or Spencer Gulf, but for a 15 minute over-water flight within sight of land the Marlins should do the job.
  4. Manual activation of the gas cylinder is OK. You don’t want it to inflate before you’re out of the cockpit.
  5. @$&!!! Just bought one from BCF for $99. Thanks for the tip anyway.
  6. That's the plan for tomorrow. Crosswinds can make things interesting for sure.
  7. Agreed. As long as it's an inflatable type and not a fixed flotation jacket, it should be OK.
  8. I have no springs in the RV either and my rudder cables are equal length, I doubt that you will notice the small amount of right pedal down but you will notice not having to hold constant right pedal pressure in level cruise if the tab is adjusted correctly. My tab is offset to the left about 10 degrees (at a guess) so it pushes the rudder to the right to counteract the left yaw. If I'm climbing I still have to hold quite a bit of additional right rudder to keep the ball centered and conversely have to hold left rudder when descending. The RV is quite sensitive to trim changes.
  9. Had a look a BCF recently and they had a good range of Marlin jackets. All aimed at boating of course and most not ideal for aircraft, but should be able to find something good enough for the odd trip overseas from Perth to Rottnest and back. Thanks for the replies.
  10. Any recommendations for reasonably priced aviation life jackets for the odd over-water flight?
  11. Correct. You need air pressure on the rudder to force it to a position where it counteracts the yaw, and the fixed trim tab does this - at least near enough for most flight regimes.
  12. I landed at Meekatharra on my way back to Perth last year and stayed there overnight hoping for storms further south to pass. The plane was parked in the open but luckily well tied down with the tail pointed into the prevailing wind. Even tying it down was difficult in the strong westerly because it kept trying to weathervane and turn around. A severe squall lasting twenty minutes came through in the early hours and the wind was howling through the trees. I arrived at the field next morning fully expecting to find a pile of wreckage in the scrub, but although the plane had obviously moved around, the tie downs, brakes and gust locks had held and there was no damage. Had the plane not been tail into wind I’m not sure the tie down ropes would have held the wings against the lift. I knew about the rope along the wings trick to break the lift but of course didn’t have any. I was also lucky that I didn’t have to rely on my own tie downs or I would have lost the plane.
  13. I think you're more likely to find examples of where not safety wiring has caused or contributed to an accident. If the safety wiring is effective, there won't be anything to see.
  14. Email received from CASA today: Bushfires: stay away This year’s early and intense bushfires have meant a number of firefighting activities are occurring right around the country. Water bombing aircraft operate low level and may change locations at short notice depending on fire conditions. All manned and unmanned aircraft must stay away from bushfires to ensure they do not endanger the essential firefighting operations. A current combined flight information region (FIR) NOTAM warns of ‘unnotified intense aviation activity associated with firefighting operations’ and requires pilots of manned aircraft to remain 5 nm clear of a bushfire horizontally and more than 3000 ft AGL. Unmanned aircraft should only be flown 5 nm horizontally away from a fire and no higher than 120 m or 400 ft AGL. These restrictions remain permanently in place until withdrawn. This is in addition to any temporary restricted areas that also may be declared near large fires. Before setting off, make sure you check fire conditions in your local area and on your planned route.
  15. So if I understand correctly, hosting is about $3,000 per year whichever platform you use, and the net saving for switching back to XF would be about $600 per year? I think that at the very least the site should break even. You shouldn't have to find most of that money out of your own pocket to provide us with this service. If a few ads would help bring in more revenue, then go for it. Have you tried getting some sponsorship, say from RAAus or SAAA since you are providing a service that complements what they do and most of us here are probably members of one or both organisations?
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