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naremman

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About naremman

  • Rank
    Well-known member
  • Birthday 12/09/1954

Information

  • Aircraft
    Airtourer
  • Location
    Cntral Wheatbelt WA
  • Country
    Australia

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  1. Sorry guys, but you have missed the apex of affordable aviation by about 40 years!! At the risk of being labelled an irrelevant old fart, the early 1980's marked the transition from encouragement to imposition. Next year will mark 40 years since the introduction of the BFR: "this is not a test, it is an opportunity to convince me you are safe to be let loose to commit aviation for the next two years"!! What benefit, how many downsides? At this point the bulk of pilots still had a green cardboard licence holder embossed with "Department of Civil Aviation" , t
  2. naremman

    GAF Jindivik

    One of the first projects that Henry Millicer worked on after his arrival in Australia. 1952 saw his submission of the Airtourer design to the competition run by the UK Royal Aero Club to promote a replacement for the Tiger Moth. Quite a contrast, work on the Jindivik by day and design the Airtourer in his spare time!!
  3. naremman

    Hawker Tomtit

    The pictured Tomtit based at Old Warden was for a few years during the 1940's owned by Alex Henshaw, who used it as a general runabout. In his autobiography "Sigh for a Merlin" there is a chapter "Requiem for a Tomtit". Its connection with Alex ended abruptly, when after a long day flight testing Spitfires produced at Castle Bromwich he was going to sneak home just beating last light. Unfortunately a new Spitfire had been placed on the grass which was his commonly used take off path. The ensuing Tomtit versus Spitfire collision did a fair amount of damage to both aircraft and pilo
  4. Likewise saw it at Old Warden in 1976 when they were putting enough of the pieces together to make a static display of it. During the weekdays you could walk through the hangars and talk freely to the volunteer workers. Whilst reassembling the Comet the discussion was to whether it would ever be airworthy again, given the issues that arose to ground so many wooden construction aircraft in the 1960's. It is fantastic to see it in the sky again. Once we overcome the COVID issues and we can travel again, I look forward to another Biggleswade visit, and particularly to see
  5. To me, aerobatic flying represents the apex of my flying experiences, but I probably don't represent the norm of the average pilot. The percentage that of pilots that happily engage indulging inverted flight leaves us in a small minority, which establishes its own balance. My introduction to aerobatic flight, nearly 50 years ago, occurred at our local aero club's Xmas function, just after I had gone solo in a venerable C172. We had a great "gatekeeper" as a member, as welcoming and inclusive as you can get, who invited me for a fly in his Victa Airtourer. Arthur had a well establi
  6. Sadly it was our Kiwi cousins who gave us a lesson on what the Airtourer, and it's big brother the Aircruiser, could have become it had been retained in Australia. The T5 and T6 variants balanced performance and handling. Interestingly many 100 hp Airtourers bingled in NZ resurfaced as T3s, with the Rolls Royce 0-240 130 hp, retaining the balance of the 100, yet with a bit more grunt. I did have the pleasure of flying PMC before it was parked in a Jarrah forest East of Perth, and considered it retained the 100s handling, but was on a substantial dose of steroids! I ha
  7. Nev, et al, a bit of thread drift here. When the Airtourer was introduced to the market in 1962 it was unique as a civil designed, all metal acrobatic training aircraft. It's contemporaries were Tigers, Chippies, Colts, early C150s, or C172 or PA 28, none of them promising earth shattering performance. Like all aircraft, introduce heat and elevation and the scenario does not improve. Whilst the early Airtourer was satisfactory in temperate coastal locations, after a short visit to Alice Springs it did not take long for the 115 version to become an option. I have he
  8. Yenn, I can relate an experience when something similar was done. Following its manufacture my Airtourer was due for delivery to Latrobe Valley Aero Club around May 1964. Henry Millicer took leave as the Chief Designer at Victa and volunteered to deliver said aircraft. Henry, being Henry had absolute faith in his aircraft and the brand new Rolls Royce 0-200A, drew a straight line from Bankstown to Morwell and launched off for 8000" with all the performance a 100 Hp Airtourer can summon. Henry did vouch that the heater worked as designed! Henry was recalling the flight a
  9. You could simply check out a Victa Airtourer, and pay particular attention to the waggler!
  10. Skippy, Whilst I am happy to endorse the general sentiment of you comments, any Victa Airtourer pilot will be happy to point out one of the exceptions. The "donkey dick" fuel gizmo to determining (guessing) fuel contents in the fuel bladder of any Airtourer gives any pilot about to launch off no great degree of confidence what so ever. Coupled with an original fuel gauge not renown for the slightest degree of accuracy, fuel in/fuel required assumes a critical importance. The ATSB focused on the Airtourer fuel quantity issue following a couple of notable bingles where no/low fuel had
  11. Well, the original electric fuel pump on my 56 year old Airtourer is still ticking away quite happily. I have fun telling the apprentice who has to disasemble it to clean the filter what the consequences are for not getting it to seat well when it gets put back together again! I think I remember years ago being told a suitable replacement was what went into some early Range Rovers. Nev can you help? Facit? The mechanical fuel pump is of CAV make, same as went onto Chamberlain tractors. The fuel filter is also CAV and what was fitted to Chamberlain Countryman 6 tractors. The local John
  12. "The reality is that transfer systems from the regions to the cities for medical care are here to stay." Well said Jaba-who. Great to have a medical speciallist who understands the reality of the immense challenge of providing some level of medical care to rural and remote patients encapsulate the issue so succintly, in one sentence. Brilliant. I am in my seventh decade of life, having lived all that time in rural and remote except for five years of boarding school in Perth, and have observed the comparative provision of health services between city and country develop to an ever widenin
  13. I had the pleasure of attending two of the Perth events, and relished the opportunity of observing the top echelon of pilots demonstrate their considerable skills, making something that appears really challenging, be performed almost without fault time after time. The real competition seemed to be who could gain a few hundreds of a second advantage over the other pilots. The bit I enjoyed was the impromptu aerobatics once they were through the final gate, and trying to work out whether they were expressing joy or frustration! Perth Water was such a brilliant location, with the airstrip l
  14. I think we are in the same paddock Byron, but jusr with a slightly different gait.
  15. If it had of occurred during either March or September would it be attributable to the Equinox?
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