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Helmet survival rate


Guest High Plains Drifter
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Guest High Plains Drifter

Came across this in my research for a new helmet -

 

Quote;["A close friend that was with the FAA helped me research flight helmets stats years ago. He had personally investigated the crash site of 26 fatal Alaska cub crashes, most of the pilots that had died would have survived if they were wearing a helmet. His opinion after seeing the autopsy's is all but 4 of the 26 dead pilots would have lived if they had worn a flight helmet. The autopsy of many of the dead pilots showed the only major trauma was to the head. Usually the front left quadrant of the scull was crushed. It seems that all to often even with a shoulder harness your head hits the left side of the plane with enough force to just barley kill you.

 

Cessna has research that shows “survival rate in an aircraft crash is 95.7% if you eliminate the head trauma†]

 

The quote came from a 'Helmet' thread over at Super Cubs Forum. There were no challanges to these claims, so it may be right. I'm not sure about the Cessna bit though.

 

Cubs compare closely to many RAAus types in speed and operational profiles.

 

It would be interesting to know how many pilots in fatal Ultralight aircraft were wearing helmets - and would it of made any difference.

 

Perhaps if the Govmint wants to give out money for the supposed safety of ADSB, it may be better spent on an area of real risk to RAAus pilots.

 

HPD

 

 

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Perhaps if the Govmint wants to give out money for the supposed safety of ADSB, it may be better spent on an area of real risk to RAAus pilots.

oooh, cat, pidgeons, pocorn...011_clap.gif.c796ec930025ef6b94efb6b089d30b16.gif

 

 

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Guest pelorus32

From what I've read there is no doubt that helmets enhance survivability very substantially. The question is do you want to wear one in your aircraft and get a hot sweaty head, bump your head on the overhead and side structures all the time and pay the very expensive tariff to get to the starting gate with a good helmet?

 

There is no doubt also that the visors on helmets substantial reduce injury and enhance survivability in birdstrike incidents. Not to mention the hearing protection you get from a good helmet.

 

Love helmets, but I don't think they are a viable option in the Tecnam et all that many now fly in RA.

 

Regards

 

Mike

 

 

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Helmet stats.

 

Probably true, but Alaska has some pretty steep hills. Tightening your seat belt right up prior to landing is a big help too, but how many of us do it? The only plane that I have worn a helmet in is a drifter and I'm not sure whether I would like to wear one all the time. From time to time people propose these for cars. I can remember riding motorcycles before they were compulsory. I recall being knocked off my Royal Enfield Bullet in Parramatta and landing on the back of my head ( now that could explain a few things.)....Nev...

 

 

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  • 1 year later...

I've seen pictures of people wearing motorbike helmets for open cockpit aircraft, probably not much cheaper than a full aviation helmet anyway once you installed a communications thingo in it!

 

 

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Never worn a helmet,never will, however, I do think a helmet would save some pilots but one of the things to consider when deciding to wear a helmet or not is that by being restrained by a seat belt,in a crash the mass of the helmet,wanting to keep traviling foward, could injure or break the neck.

 

Case Example,

 

A guy who did his flight training with me and had many hours experience in his own Quicksilver GT 500,hit a power line with his aircraft and crashed onto the highway,Witnesses said he hardly had a mark on him, however, he wasn`t wearing a helmet and he must have hit the side of his head on one of the cockpit struts which come down on both sides of the pilot as there was a mark on the side of his head.

 

He was taken unconsious to the Cairns Base Hospital where surgery was peformed on his head, that night,regretably he died the next day.

 

Would a helmet have saved this pilot ???????????????????.

 

Frank.

 

 

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I do wear a lightweight plastic shelled ski helmet in the lazair due to the close proximity of the uprights. you can bang your head on them in rough air.

 

the other benefit is hearing protection. i am considering changing soon to an amazingly lighter but stronger carbon fiber 'Cookie' skydive helmet. expensive but the bee's knees.

 

ozzie

 

 

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When I purchased my helmets for my trike, one of the things that was pointed out to me by John Reyneldson wasd the danger of wearing an over the top of your head headset under the helmet. In the event of an accident the metal in the headset band was just as likely as anything else to create a major problem.

 

Johns alternate (Aerial pursuits) was a back of neck metalwork holding the earsets and boom mike with just a velco adjusted 1" wide silk ribbon to go over the top between skull and helmet.

 

As with all thing I cant speak to the science behind the claim, other than to say it made sense to me. The headsets themselves were effective.

 

Andy

 

 

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try using the new earbud type headsets with a helmet. i don't use a radio but use buds for my i pod, no probs with them lighter again and very comfy

 

 

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I read Col Pays ATSB report tonight and it made mention of the fact that he wasn't wearing a helmet at the time he was testing the experimental water scoops.

 

AO-2007-066

 

An interesting read but what a tragedy losing such an experienced aviator like that. I wonder if he was wearing the helmet, perhaps he may not have become incapacitated as the plane sunk?

 

Sad stuff. 049_sad.gif.af5e5c0993af131d9c5bfe880fbbc2a0.gif

 

 

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helmets for planes.

 

The only aircraft that I have worn a helmet in is a drifter. The reason is that you are out in the air. I would wear one in a cropduster, also.

 

I used to ride motorbikes before they became compulsory, You are more aware of the other traffic without one, although the safety case is pretty much agreed there. Farri makes a good point with seat belts restraining the pilot and the extra weight of the helmet acting on the pilots neck.. Race cars have both so I suppose the facts are out there. to be accessed.

 

The downside to any protective headgear is some loss of sensory awareness, You are only going to hear what comes through the headphones, and IF the helmet doesn't fit well it will cause discomfort. I always fly with a peaked cap to screen out the sun , particularly when landing into it when the peak can be pulled right down .The landing situation is covered by tightening the seatbelt and I would suggest padding the cockpit where head contact might occur. landing groundspeeds are not high in our aircraft also so this is to our advantage also. Nev

 

 

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Student Pilot. The report reads-

 

The results of the post mortem examination indicated that: The principal cause of death has been given as water immersion death (drowning secondary to incapacitation associated with a closed head injury and neck injury).

 

I guess this thread, the crash report and other members stories are all something that we can look at and make an informed judgement on.

 

Again, sad that a very experienced aviator was lost.

 

 

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IIRC years ago I saw something about a car helmet. Think what is now a push-bike/surfers helmet rather than a m/c-helmet. Mainly looked at temple protection and shock. General theory was 90% of benefits were obtained with 10% of cost/weight etc.

 

Could this be the way to go? Any references?

 

Edited to add - If you wear a headset anyway.

 

 

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I`m only talking about Recreational, ( Ultralight Aircraft ) , here.

 

There`s no doubt that a good quality helmet could decrease head injury but as for survival rate,I realy don`t know.

 

It would help and be interesting to know if there are any figures on the number of pilots who have died, just from head injury, and how many have survived, with head injuries, from not wearing a helmet.

 

I`ve been looking at accident reports for 25 years and the only one that I`m aware of, that just might have survived a "crash",is the case that I`ve posted on this thread.

 

A crash, in one of these aircraft is almost always fatal as there`s more of the human body to be protected than just the head.

 

Frank.

 

Ps. Charls Ligetti ( name spelling may be wrong ) was wearing a helmet and was killed testing the Stratos.

 

 

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when helmets were made mandatory for hang gliding the number of head injury deaths and vege cases from hitting the keel dropped substantially.

 

 

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Wearing helmets in Rec aircraft has been difficult due to the confined space in which we operate.

 

Looking over your shoulder is hard enough at the best of times.

 

I have often mentioned helmets to my peers etc but have often been met with cries of, "" do you want to be a fighter pilot"" or "" only for flyers of ""patio furniture""

 

 

 

Well I found the perfect solution, and there is no reason now that we don't all get one.

 

Not sure if they,re available here in Oz ? (Clear Prop take note!)

 

The Aero-ist Flight Cap.. PERFECT!! 041_helmet.gif.78baac70954ea905d688a02676ee110c.gif

 

 

 

Aero-ist Clothing Limited

 

 

 

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Looks promising but I didn't notice a chin strap. Coming from a motorcycling background, I am strongly in favour of brain buckets. But, it is of no use if it falls of for want of a (fastened) chinstrap.

While I agree that a chinstrap would be useful (and sensible), it kind of ruins the "helmet? what helmet? this is my hat" thing they seem to be going for...

 

 

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Well I found the perfect solution, and there is no reason now that we don't all get one.

Looks good, like the others said though, it must only sit on ones head... but that is pretty good still, it's not like you are going to shake your head up side down to make it fall off hey? my cap is pretty well glued to my head!

 

So considering that!? My neighbour wants to get me a leather helmet for the Drifter!

 

 

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I,m the same Black rod,coming from an extensive motorcycle background including competition dirt bikes and roadies I,m very aware of ""brain buckets"" and their benefits.

 

And I think in 99 % of cases your headset should help keep it on enough. Except my headset is a Light Speed Mach 1 in the ear style, so I will probably make chin strap for mine. I,ll give you an update when I get it sorted.

 

 

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I come from years of motorbike riding, also, both dirt track racing in my late teens/early twenties and road riding untill my late thirthies and in the early days helmets were not compulsory so I experienced it from both sides.

 

Like a lot of things, helmets should be a matter of choice(and I do understand the implications to everyone concerned, when someone is criticaly injured), however, if we make helmets compulsory are we then going to go a bit furthur and make helmets compulsory in motor cars,where the head injuries realy are happening at an alarming rate.

 

Cheers,

 

Frank. 002_wave.gif.62d5c7a07e46b2ae47f4cd2e61a0c301.gif "Choice Is Freedom"

 

 

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Perhaps the side/curtain airbag might be a practical development for light aircraft one day?

A lot of new GA aircraft are coming out with those already...

 

 

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Looks promising but I didn't notice a chin strap. Coming from a motorcycling background, I am strongly in favour of brain buckets. But, it is of no use if it falls of for want of a (fastened) chinstrap.

Reminds me of all the war movies when the actors, jump and run around and their helmets fall off every two minutes, and they keep putting them back on. I guess in the movies it doesnt look cool to do use the chin strap HA
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