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Student Pilot

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About Student Pilot

  • Rank
    Well-known member
  • Birthday 18/05/1903

Information

  • Aircraft
    C172D
  • Location
    Southwest Vic
  • Country
    Australia

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  1. Flying powerlines has been done for many years. I would consider an Ag rating the minimum training. Was this an RAA aircraft?
  2. Saw it flyover western vic a few years ago, it was very slow
  3. Spanish built Hispano Battle of Britten star Buchan?
  4. Is there any other reason for flying?
  5. That aircraft doesn't look very stable in pitch
  6. Going forward...................😁 You getting that speak from Canberra?
  7. 😁 Any Pipers are great little machines
  8. I am terrible at maths, not that smart yet I can fly!!!! Use all the techno babble you like if you want to sound smart or wind somebody up but I think stuff that technical has no place in flying.
  9. Couple of things, a spirit level is open to flight forces and doesn't remain level. Bob Hoover demonstration of the roll while pouring a jug of water being an example. If an aircraft cannot maintain altitude it can just descend without stalling. This thread has just become one giant pocket pissing contest. Turns at low speed need you to be aware of the aircrafts foibles and handling, no science degree needed, a degree in pedantic's not required either. Stop this madness.................
  10. Aircraft, Gary.......................Aircraft 😔
  11. A slip has crossed controls skid usually not. Balanced flight always better, there are times when a slip can be used to loose height/speed. Some people who can't/don't want to crab down final in a crosswind use flying out of balance or a skid. I have always used crabbing.
  12. Not sure about the last variants of the Corsair but most of the ones in WW2 had fabric spar back. I have seen a pic of rows of Corsairs lined up after war in the Pacific, they must have been there a while as most of the fabric had rotted away showing the structure underneath. I would have thought a Corsair was good for over 300 knots indicated. Most of the WW2 fighters had fabric control surfaces and the likes of Spitfire went well over 240 knots.
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