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One from last night - the Pelican Nebula in Cygnus. I had planned for about 3hrs of exposure on this one, but the USB comms crashed whilst I was snoozing on the sofa at 2am. So I only got about an hour and 20mins. The image is a bit noisy as a result. The best of a bad job!

 

1040016902_PelicanNebulainCygnusRobGreaves-25thApril21.thumb.jpg.da208f2e31f8ac01dd8dd3ad7e33ccb5.jpg

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Incredible shot Phil. I wish I could take “ best of a bad job “ photos like that . I take it , it wasn’t taken in the midst of the Black Country 😀

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On 27/04/2021 at 12:41 AM, yampy said:

Incredible shot Phil. I wish I could take “ best of a bad job “ photos like that . I take it , it wasn’t taken in the midst of the Black Country 😀

I would have thought that Black Country Pics would be possible;  but pilot and Photosmith mate Rob  Greaves and his gear is located in Cornwall's Lovely clean Air !

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  • 2 months later...

 

Astro-photographer Rob Greaves:  Going for the 'how many gadgets can I fit to the instrument panel' record 🙂
 
 
 
 

Rob Greaves with Accessories.jpg

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All you need is a length of wool cellotaped to the screen .

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  • 2 weeks later...

One from last night, the Cave Nebula. Had some issues with the computer locking up and having to restart everything and re-cool the camera, so lost a lot of data in the process. This is about 3hrs worth of exposures, not enough for this target really, so a bit noisy. No signs of the hedgehog.

 

Rob Greaves.

The Cave Nebula.jpg

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That looks great Phil.

Have thought of having a go myself, but even if camera is on tripod, over a three hour period surely the subjects would have moved over that period of time. Probably more so if hooked up to a telescope which would bring images closer.

Yea, don't laugh, I know I have a lot to learn, but I enjoy seeing what others have achieved. 

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Allo Planey.

 

Rob answered the same question on bookface yesterday, it answers all of your obvious questions.  I'll see if I can re-find it.

 

**Found it.**

 

 How do you take the photos? Husband has a telescope and we had a great view of the moon the other night but trying to take a photo with our mobiles was, well, rubbish 😂🤣 I imagine whatever the solution it will be expensive?

 

Emma Louise Hi Emma, a lot is down to the equipment. First, a tracking mount that will follow the stars, and on that, something called an autoguider that watches a single star continuously and monitors its position on a camera in terms of xy coordinates. If the star drifts any, it makes very slight corrections to the mount to keep the stars round and pinpoint.

 

Second, the camera is a proper astro camera for long exposures, and a cooler built in to take the sensor chip down to -25°C to get rid of thermal noise. Thirdly, good quality optics. After that, lots of practice and skill 😉 as far a your scope goes, do you have any sort of digital camera there?

 

You can get devices called eyepiece projection adaptors that hold a camera a specific distance from the eyepiece, and square/ on axis to it, to get reasonable shots. Or alternatively, a nosepiece adaptor that fits on your camera in place of the lens, and allows you to insert that into the focuser in place of an eyepiece. The biggest trick then is getting sharp focus.

 

Rob G.

Edited by Phil Perry
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