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Guess the plane


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Guest Decca

Hi HiHo:- only that Boeing (which has nought to do with my post) bought Douglas out a few years ago.

 

DC stands for Douglas Commercial, as in DC-3 etc. And your picture has a profile not unlike a DC-5.

 

Regards, Decca.

 

EDIT: Haha, didn't notice I was right, thanks. Decca.

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

Hey friends, the DC-5 (only two built, one crashed,the other sold to either the japs or chinese) had FOUR engines and a triple tail like the Connie. They were trying to compete with the triple tailed Connie fashion.

 

I have WW2 mail envelopes that have DC-5s on the stamps, so they must have thought they had a bigger future.

 

Don't know what the twin engined job is but it looks like it could be Chinese ?......024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

This must be an earlier model, guarantee there was a four engine DC-5 with a triple tail................................024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

 

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Guest Decca

Well I'll be b-----.

 

Didn't realise there was a connection to Boeing. As far as I knew the two companies were highly competitive & aggressive in their marketing strategies, but maybe that didn't happen until the jet era. So where is this Link? (I'm a commuter dummy too!025_blush.gif.9304aaf8465a2b6ab5171f41c5565775.gif)

 

Decca.

 

 

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The Boeing connection is that Bill Boeing purchased a DC 5 as his personal transport. I think that would have been after he sold out of the Boeing Aircraft company.

 

Interesting to know what the tripple tailed DC 5 that the Maj has knowledge of

 

 

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Article.

 

Very worth a look too. Well done. The americans took to stressed skins (metal) almost universally. In the early 30's. Douglas had a fine reputation for airframe build quality. I have seen a DC-4 with over 70,000 hours pulled for full inspection and no cracks were evident in the airframe itself. Something unheard of in airframes today. The trouble with a highwing is the intrusion of the centre section spar in the ceiling of the fuselage, and the necessarily long undercarriage, which is hard to make strong and has a lot of drag when extended, causing loss of performance if you lose an engine on take-off. The Fokker F-27 which is mentioned in the article, used air (pneumatic) pressure to raise the gear, enabling it to retract more quickly and achieve a better initial climb performance.. Nev.

 

 

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Guest Decca

Noah's Ark I think. It never flew, but managed to crash on a mountain.

 

Damn I've seen a photo of this somewhere. The radial type engine nacelles look odd with something like gypsy majors in them.

 

Facthunter might know. How about a clue; Bristol perhaps?

 

Decca:cool:.

 

 

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No Idea.

 

Never seen anything like it. Its most likely wooden and the engines might be Pobjoy Cataracts. The props are wooden. The reason that I think the engines are as I suggest is the above centre siting of the prop drive. This is by a lay gear instead of the more common (and satisfactory) sun and planetary set-up. Nev.

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

Yes that DC-4E must have been the one I was thinking of. Thanks....................024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

Next one looks like a DC-10 in Continental colors ?

 

Christ, only the poms could design something that ugly, or maybe the french ?

 

 

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another clue

 

This is not the same aircraft as posted before although both were built in response to the design spec created by the men from the ministry

 

guess02.jpg.de44b0ef536587b58e7b37c09ecd918e.jpg

 

 

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