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Geoff_H

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About Geoff_H

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  • Aircraft
    Mooney
  • Location
    Sydney
  • Country
    Australia

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  1. Everything you need to know about designing for crash survival. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://apps.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a218434.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwie-cbGoObvAhUm8HMBHZtuBM4QFjACegQIBRAC&usg=AOvVaw3cFHOGbCb_0w_GSjU22SZb
  2. I think that flat pancake landings stem from spins that are not recovered in time. Not usually taught or exercised these days.https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/139874&ved=2ahUKEwj0mumb_OXvAhVw63MBHctKBi8QFjAAegQIAxAC&usg=AOvVaw2neq18dc8p_7Jc8AS4nUuk
  3. Kevlar strerches and changes colour, hence you can see if it is damaged
  4. Many years ago a Chipmunk VH FTA spun to the ground and killed both on board. Not long after an experimental made of Kevlar also spun into the ground. The pilot got out and walked away. The Kevlar all stretched and destroyed but the energy was absorbed by the Kevlar. When I trimmed Kevlar on a layup the Stanley knife had chips in the blade from cutting it. Very tough stuff that.
  5. Is this failure of the window struts common? It seems like the floor is absorbing most of the impact. But the doors are not sticking closed and locking the pilot and passenger in. Must be good if a fire develops. I still would be somewhat worried at such a significant structure failure in an accident, but it seems to work for the better. Amazing! It just shows how not everything is as we would imagine.
  6. I think that I would rather have my cabin remain enclosed. It broke at the highest loaded parts, the side window struts. I am glad all survived.
  7. I must disagree that structure strength is more important than energy absorption of the structure upon impact. A totally rigid structure will not impart an infinite force that will break the structure. Impact absorption is more important as this reduces the energy available to cause very high stresses that will break the structure. The triangular steel frames work by the high impact absorption on deformation of the steel. The real performance indicator of a good design in a crash is the energy to deformation and in an aircraft the weight must also be a parameter. When considering theses par
  8. If you are looking at composite aircraft and are serious about the amount of energy that your frame will absorb before you start absorbing the energy, (not so good), but want a strong light structure you would use an interwoven carbon fibre and Kevlar cloth. It costs around five to ten times that of straight glass but in Izod impact tests absorbs over twice the energy of straight glass. You will be paying for increased crash absorption. How many of us would pay for that option?
  9. The Mooney cabin is a safety cage design
  10. Some of the very early experimental aircraft used Kevlar in their construction. A flat spin with the pilot walking away was regarded as fantastic safety. Problem is that it is tough not strong. Some cloths use carbon fibre and Kevlar interwoven to give strength and toughness. I designed and started to build a glass aircraft with a layer of Kevlar. It was far too heavy and I abandoned the project at fuselage stage.
  11. Have a look at the amazing survival rate of the Mooney. Tail is monocoque but cabin is steel frame with aluminium covering. This is design for minimum weight and maximum survival.
  12. The ones that I used required heaters to keep the element at a constant temperature, around 1600deg if my memory serves me right. I agree that one for each combustion chamber would be needed to get an accurate engine situation. I don't know what the IC injection systems use. The early ones were not nearly as reliable as the later ones.
  13. Yes. I have used them extensively for oxygen trimming controls in exhaust gas systems. They need constant recalibration, so nitrogen and part oxygen gases to frequently calibrate. The best systems automatically calibrate. I am not sure that they would be suited to aircraft, but I think that many vehicles use them.
  14. A great part of the world to fly in. I used to love that area when doing Perth to Sydney. Picked up fuel at Port Pirie.
  15. My great great grandfather was a sea captain that sailed th 200ton Waitama from Port Adelaide to Albany and Perth. On his last sailing the ship started to leak and he beached the ship on St Francis island (off Ceduna), he was there for 3 months before being rescued. On one of my flights across the bight I cam over the island swearing to visit it. I later found out about my ancestor being shipwrecked on this island
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