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NT5224

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  • Aircraft
    Murphy Rebel
  • Location
    Robin Falls, The Territory
  • Country
    Australia

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  1. Hi folks. In my personal experience kangaroo repellers don't work. I've tried a couple (on vehicles not my aircraft!) However, my take on why they don't work is as follows. Kangaroos are dumb. I absolutely love them, but they are among the dumbest of Gods creatures! When Im out walking the sound of my footsteps through the bush will likely scatter a a big mob when they hear me approaching. However, I can fire a shotgun close to the same mob and they will stand frozen, transfixed by the sound or in some cases even hop forward to investigate. So the q
  2. Nup Assuming my wife is at home, I radio ahead. My strip is about a kilometre through thick forest from the house but when the boy is dispatched and Im circling overhead it takes him about three minutes to get there and another two minutes to clear the length of the strip... ( say time it takes me to fly one circuit). He won't approach an aircraft until the engine shuts down. He knows his job... Of course if he's flying with us its more of an issue... Perhaps we should explore the parachute concept...? 🤣 Alan
  3. Where I live we have a mob of 30- 50 roos that graze my strip morning and evening when I generally fly. I have therefore developed a highly effective method of clearing the airfield prior to landing or take-off. Its 100% effective, and this effectiveness does not diminish. It is also humane, as no animals are hurt or unduly frightened by my control method. Here it is: Alan
  4. Hey folks A good question from OP. Even though I now only fly GA I am firmly of the opinion that BFRs are valuable. My personal experience of BFs in RAA and GA has basically been good. Instructors have been helpful and the process has been beneficial. Particularly somebody like myself, who operates remotely from their own strip rather than In a club environment, spending a couple of hours with an instructor is useful to pull up on any emerging bad habits. But in the past I have added some additional endorsements to my ticket as a way of achiev
  5. Merry Christmas to all and their loved ones Lets hope this coming year is better than the current one! Alan
  6. Hi Glen I said earlier that my new hangar has been built without a concrete floor, exactly along the lines of what Nev has suggested. I would echo this as a genuine alternative to a slab, depending on what and where you are building. I have built plenty of slabs. My wife and I built our whole home including outbuildings, workshops, sheds and now hangar entirely with our own hands. We have only had outside assistance with electrical wiring and our off grid solar system. All our slabs have been hand mixed and poured on site, because we are too far for a concrete delivery
  7. I know there are great pics from the air of international airports congested with grounded passenger aircraft, but I've just driven into the Alice airport and had to do a double take as I turned the corner onto the airport access road. Dozens of aircraft dragged into the scrub and left there. Its quite extraordinary! Not something I expected to see in my lifetime. Alan
  8. Hi RF guy...I just built out of the dirt. No concrete slab.. but interested to follow this thread for when I hoist a proper hangar
  9. All good points Skippy. A good pilot can fly any configuration of aircraft most places. However as a tailwheel pilot myself based at an outback strip, I consider conventional configuration offers a number of advantages for Bush flying. Possibly tougher undercarriage as you point out, but more important is propeller clearance... There is also something to be said for the angle of attack tail wheel configuration offers. But hey, the trade off is a really slow cruise and many would feel a faster aircraft better suited to long distance touring... Its just a matter of pers
  10. I have little doubt that Faeta are excellent aircraft. They look great and so they probably fly great too. We all know the Czechs build good small aircraft. But the specific question is whether one would make the best touring aircraft for a lap? My personal feeling is that aircraft with bubble canopies are just not climate appropriate in northern Australia. Unless you want to wear a hat and sun cream all way round... Perhaps there is a tropical model with a opaque canopy? Also I would always favour high wing and tail dragger for the bush and rough strips. Thats not to say tha
  11. My preference for a LSA tourer would be a Brumby in conventional configuration (taildragger). Metal, tough, tough, and easily repairable and lots of room inside. Having crossed over to VH now, I think I'd struggle with a 600kg MTOW these days, but if I had to, the Brumby would let me use every kilogram. The J230 is a great aircraft with awesome cruise but for my tour I'd want to be dropping into out of the way places and rough strips, where the Brumby would perform better. Alan
  12. Hi Shajen! Congrats on the beautiful new bird. I've gotta ask. Do you now have two Jabirus? Didn't you give us a glimpse of one in your hangar a few months ago? Cheers Alan
  13. Scott That's a wonderful video! Its a very beautiful neighborhood you have there, and the production quality of the clip was high. Great job! Three questions: What's the Legend like to Fly? Its got a whiff of Cessna about its appearance. Does that carry over to flight characteristics? Just a two seater, right? Its a nice looking aircraft. Second, can you tell us anything about your external camera mount? It seems to work really well. Finally, do you fly far enough over the soup to need to carry a life raft and buoyancy aids? O
  14. Just as we finished the last stages of our home hangar build we decided to move our bird up to MKT and an available hangar space there. Cant wait for the luxury of our own Hangar not having to worry about cramming in with other aircraft, moving things around and the ever present fear of 'hangar rash'. The ferry hop to the coast was pleasant and I just love clear wet season mornings. VID-20201130-WA0005.mp4
  15. As said above, for me 'easy to fly' suggests a nice stable airframe with forgiving flight characteristics. That is integral to the aircraft. 'Nice to fly' suggests the both the experience of flying (comfort) and what you can do with an aircraft (performance). My own aircraft is very easy to fly, extremely stable (some might call it 'boring' in flight). But you have a huge interior, can fly cross-country eight hours ( admittedly at a very slow speed) and can land pretty much anywhere. Its built really tough and solid and you have the advantage of it being a proper
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