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So I've been thinking back on my primary training days about what I found the hardest thing to overcome!

 

and this list is what comes to mind.

 

  • Normal landings
     
     
  • Crosswind landings
     
     
  • Judging the flare for landing
     
     
  • Maintain centreline approach from final
     
     
  • Correcting for wind drift on the upwind leg
     
     
  • Maintaining level wings in general
     
     
  • Remembering to do my downwind checks BUMFISH
     
     
  • Feeling for when the plane is slipping or skidding
     
     
  • Keeping a constant lookout i.e not looking at the gauges (thanks to flight simulator)
     
     
  • Sensory overload
     
     
  • Taxing on centreline
     
     

 

 

so I look back and also think there was much "unlearning" I had to do as well.

 

would like to hear from others what challenges/difficulties you faced while undergoing your primary training.

 

regards

 

 

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Study the theory inside out and know your speeds, don't let the aircraft get in front of you.

Going from fairly slow aircraft into something fast ,like an RV6-7 , was really difficult, took ages to get ahead of it and feel really comfy, oddly my aircraft is 80 knot cruise ,I went for a fly for the first time in 4 years in an RV7 the other day and expected to be really behind it but I felt no different than if I'd been in regularly , maybe once you get used to the speed it doesn't really leave you.

Feeling a skid or slip is still something I have to look at the ball for, I guess I don't have a sensitive ars3,

 

Matt

 

 

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As a brand new student starting out, is there anything you guys think you could have done to lessen these early challenges?

Practice, practice, practice.... Also realize at times you will have days that just don't go as well as you would have liked. Sometimes there will be maneuvers or landings that you will get frustrated with because you are not progressing as fast as you think you should be. I had a couple of days in my training where my landings were so bad that I really questioned if I should continue flying. I'm glad I didn't quit, as the next time I flew I was able to greatly improve. Sometimes it just takes a couple of days of not flying to help focus yourself. Also as my instructor says everyone has a bad day now and then.

 

Another I think that should be added to the list is talking on the radio. A lot of new students have problems with that. I still feel very self conscious and make mistakes when getting into busy airspace and talking to approach or departure.

 

 

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I personally recommend after a person has done about 8 to 10 hrs get a second instructor to show them how he would handle the situation

 

as I have had three top instructors that drilled in to me the value of fly the bloody plane

 

practice all you can but if your instructor has taught you wrong in the first place it will not change

 

like one aspiring pilot I went for a flight with no pre landing checks what so ever flew on final 30 to 45 degrees had to turn at under 100 feet to line up strip

 

when question on why he did it that way replied no one is here to see it i aint been back

 

or this one pilot learning could not get flare right took him for a flight in right hand seat and told him just shut up and watch his instructor latter on asked what I had taught him quote "not allowed to teach him but there is no rule to say I cant show him" unquote

 

there is an old saying monkey do as monkey see neil

 

 

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I would strongly recommend doing a bit of time in gliders before starting powered training.

 

Having done it the other way round, I can only say how much the gliding improved my flying. Particularly good for teaching rudder, co-ordinated turns, and judgement for approach, flare & landing. You can't gas it up & do a goaround in a glider!

 

It's also cheaper as a way of getting airborne.

 

But however you train - persevere. It will be worth it.

 

Bruce

 

 

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So I've been thinking back on my primary training days about what I found the hardest thing to overcome!and this list is what comes to mind.

 

  • Normal landings
     
     
  • Crosswind landings
     
     
  • Judging the flare for landing
     
     
  • Maintain centreline approach from final
     
     
  • Correcting for wind drift on the upwind leg
     
     
  • Maintaining level wings in general
     
     
  • Remembering to do my downwind checks BUMFISH
     
     
  • Feeling for when the plane is slipping or skidding
     
     
  • Keeping a constant lookout i.e not looking at the gauges (thanks to flight simulator)
     
     
  • Sensory overload
     
     
  • Taxing on centreline
     
     

 

 

so I look back and also think there was much "unlearning" I had to do as well.

 

would like to hear from others what challenges/difficulties you faced while undergoing your primary training.

 

regards

Looking back on my training, the list you gave is pretty normal if you're still in the early stages of your training. Even after you solo, don't expect to be Chuck Yeager. The instructors get you to the point where you should be reasonably safe on your own, but there is still a LOT to learn and get fluent with.

The main thing is try not to be too hard on yourself. In the early stages you are in almost constant cognitive overload. It does get better with time and practice. Don't give up. Giving up is the surest formula for failure.

 

To answer your question though: When I was flying trikes, turbulence was a show stopper for me. Then I transitioned to 3 axis and I found dealing with the rudder the most difficult. I still keep a weather eye on the skid ball and it has taken a while for me to be able to "feel" when the plane is out of balance.

 

 

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I would strongly recommend doing a bit of time in gliders before starting powered training.Having done it the other way round, I can only say how much the gliding improved my flying. Particularly good for teaching rudder, co-ordinated turns, and judgement for approach, flare & landing. You can't gas it up & do a goaround in a glider!

 

It's also cheaper as a way of getting airborne.

 

But however you train - persevere. It will be worth it.

 

Bruce

Definately agree with the glider training. I'm planning to do it after I finish my private. I'm hoping it will greatly improve my rudder control and crosswind landings. Now that you put it this way I wish I would have thought of doing glider training before powered flight.

 

 

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I have only flown up to and completed my GFPT test. all my instruction were done in a citabria. but in preparation to start my training back these are the elements I recall finding difficult to overcome.

 

 

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Graphic visualisation, or mental practice.

 

Watch the Australian Open or any other golf tournament. You will see the champions take two or three practice swings before they actually hit the ball, and visualise where the ball will go. Watch Matt Hall or any other aerobatic champion before they fly. They step through their routine on the ground, visualising what they are going to do in the air. To onlookers, it may look weird, but it gets their mind "in the groove".

 

 

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I used to be the crazy guy walking his dogs, talking out loud to himself. I would recite all the prestart routines, engine start, radio calls, pre-take off run ups, take off, circuit calls, downwind checks, etc out loud as a way of making them more second nature to me.

 

I found it really helped, particularly with the radio calls, stopped me getting tongue tied.

 

I find I still do it when I am having withdrawals between flights ... Lol.

 

Phil

 

 

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I used to be the crazy guy walking his dogs, talking out loud to himself. I would recite all the prestart routines, engine start, radio calls, pre-take off run ups, take off, circuit calls, downwind checks, etc out loud as a way of making them more second nature to me.I found it really helped, particularly with the radio calls, stopped me getting tongue tied.

I find I still do it when I am having withdrawals between flights ... Lol.

 

Phil

I'm thinking I should start being more crazy like you. I'm might start trying this at random places and see what looks I get:) Seriously this is a great idea. In school I was horrible at giving speeches. Then I actually got into acting which taught me to take a whole different approach to giving speeches. I started memorizing and practicing them out loud over and over like I would for a stage performance. After all the rehearsal my confidence went way up when giving speeches because by the time the real thing came it was almost second nature. I think the same thing can definately work for radio calls.

 

 

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Registration plates, or license plates for our American cousins, are also great to practice your phonetic alphabet and radio calls. My wife and I used to drive around talking in phonetic when we didn't want the kids to understand what we were talking about - worked great until they joined Scouts and learned about it!

 

 

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Learning to fly is all about training your brain to do several new things at the same time. I always found during training when I had to concentrate on doing new things like radio calls or downwind checks it would always distract me from flying the plane. So I found it helpful to practice doing radio calls or checks such as downwind or forced landing checks while I was doing something else complicated in every day life.

 

So make a radio call turning base while you are driving the car around a corner at the traffic lights. Do some downwind checks while you are parking the car in a tight spot. Sometimes I'd practice things while playing the piano or driving a truck in heavy traffic. Then these things quickly become second nature and it frees up your mind for the most important thing - learning to fly the aeroplane.

 

 

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It must be standard for student pilots, my instructor suggested calling out rego plates in the phonetics, all my kids and missus learned it at the same time, I also was doing inbound calls to where ever I was driving to ,it really helps.

 

Matty

 

 

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