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I watched your video Dan. Excellent. I'm reading the old Stick and Rudder at the moment and even just 40 years after flying first started he's discussing AOA as primarily what it's all about and the feasibility of AOA warning systems. 

 

The 172 I flew out to Wahoo, NE had a stall warning. Guess all the Cessna have one. Pulled out of shirt field take off ground affect too early once and pushed the stick back down with the horn in the background. CFI also pushed it down.... 2 X AOA systems 🙂

 

Flying the LSA variety now and they don't seem to feature this that I've come across so far.

 

im a fan of yours now.. will keep watching your youtubes. Thanks.

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Thanks, I saw the OP and thought I'd add some clarification. First, there is nothing "Illegal" about adding a reference to the cover of your ASI.   On larger aircraft there are slide ab

I thought Dan’s whole point was to employ the KISS principle. The yellow tape goes on your minimum manoeuvre speed which happens to be 1.3Vso for a visual reminder of DONT MANOURVE BELOW THIS SPEED, t

One "calibration" we can all do on a regular basis is to check the indicated stall speed clean and with flaps. This will verify that the ASI is working correctly at the most important end of the scale

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10 hours ago, dan gryder said:

Thanks, I saw the OP and thought I'd add some clarification.

No. Thank you for taking the time to participate in the discussion. I hope that you will continue to contribute your experience.

 

And welcome to the Recreational Flying site. 

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Yes an aircraft can exceed critical angle and stall at any IAS, but for all practical purposes, I think that’s a great idea of Gryder’s to mark a minimum safe speed on your ASI, I have already bought some thin pin stripe tape. Another reason is a lot of “low inertia” aircraft, don’t exhibit a noticeable buffet before the stall, “sloppy controls” are also not so obvious, nose attitude, maybe not so obvious with a large windshield? So, a lot of heavier aircraft will show clear stall warning signs, but not so much in an RAA aircraft? I think marking the ASI, is a good idea. Gryder came up with a pretty grim statistic, on low speed stall/loss of control accidents, can’t recall exactly, but an appalling number occur every month in the US. 

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Yes, I’m going to do so as well. I make a reasonable living as an inventor. My success is always based on a paring back toward simplicity. Mechanical and software engineers I work with must try for simple solutions. These invariably take much longer to sort out. Opposite of what you’d think.

 

I also accept the inevitability of occasional complex solutions. It’s a balancing act and requires an open mind.

 

This simple piece of tape answer has to be combined of course with all the other things we are trained to watch for. 
 

Also, a huge help when moving between different aircraft. I’ve had a steep learning curve in recent times on moving between high/ low wing/ stick/ yoke/ panel layout and different responses to input/ more less rudder/ elevator response. Enough going on and a simple ASI tape is a wonderfully simple addition to reduce complexity. Especially at high workload times.

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Always an interesting point, this TAS IAS relationship. The lift formula does use TAS (V squared) lift varies as the square of the speed, so:

Double your speed, quadruple the lift

Double your speed quadruple the drag (😪)

Double your speed, quadruple your control effectively.

This TAS/IAS relationship means that regardless of your “actual velocity” through air at a particular density, the flow of air molecules around the wing, will be indicated by your IAS. At high altitude, you need a faster flow of air molecules (because they are less dense ) to generate the same dynamic pressure, or pressure pattern on the wings...so IAS (a measure of dynamic pressure) remains essentially the same stalling at 30 000 Ft, or stalling at 5000 Ft. In truth, IAS will vary slightly, but for most of us this is disregarded. My take on it anyway.

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Always bear in mind the elevator controls the angle of attack of the wing and therefore WHEN it stalls. In the absence of a speed /attitude indicator ,Your backside should tell you, you are pulling "G" . Nearly everyone will pull the stick back instinctively if the nose is dropping. The exact opposite of what is needed if you are near a stall and for the last bit of a landing approach you can't be watching the airspeed intently as you'll be looking outside  to judge your landing.  On a stabilised approach with the planes attitude  constant and everything else left as it was your plane keeps doing what it WAS doing till you change it. These accidents just keep happening though usually when a turn is involved  workload is high or you are distracted. Nev

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