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Passenger Brief


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Just curious to what extent you do a passenger brief to a "non-flyer".

 

I mean what happens if you happen to have that 1 in a million heart attack, stroke, black out etc would the passenger know what to do? Do you point out the ASI telling them that we can't go below 60 knots, this is the throttle which makes us go faster, this is the parachute handle and if it ever gets pulled we need to pull the throttle back and this is the button for the radio.

 

I always hope that if that 1 in a million event ever happens that they could at least fly the plane and get on the radio. This also brings me to another question I pondered on today. The passenger gets on the radio and for this example we will say that we are on the area freq so what would ATC say to them :;)4:????? - if ATC was going to instruct them on landing where would they get the performance figures, layout etc specific to our aircraft from and what time would it take to get this info - I mean would they ring the RAAus? - what if it is on a weekend, do they have after hrs numbers and would say Chris have access to the info on who to ring while doing what he does on weekends etc.

 

Just pondered on this today and became curious - what do you think?

 

 

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Guest pelorus32

My Pax brief assumes that I will be alive and able to fly at least until the point of impact. (I don't for instance brief passengers on what to do in the event of me having a heart attack when I put them into my car).

 

I cover harnesses, seat adjustment, hatches, ventilation, controls and not interfering with them, headset and volume and how the hotmic works. I brief the flight itself - the process, where to, what to expect. I also tell them about my sterile cockpit within the circuit and ask them to tell me about anything that might affect the safety of flight. I enlist them as an additional set of eyes and tell them how I like to be informed of traffic.

 

Finally I brief them on issues surrounding any need to evacuate.

 

Probably forgotten something...Ah yes barf bags and for longer trips comfort stops.

 

Regards

 

Mike

 

 

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Mike - I don't actually say anything to them about "what if" but I just casually go around the panel with them - call me weird of something but I just thought that it couldn't hurt and if anything ever went wrong then they might know what to do.

 

 

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I tell my passenger(s) how to open the doors (it's not blatantly obvious).

 

I don't tell them that if the engine fails that they should unlatch the door before impact (which is important), because generally it scares them.

 

I usually help them to put on their seat belt whilst letting them operate the catch so that I know they are capable of undoing it after impact.

 

During the warmup I set their headset / intercom volume and if I think they will start grabbing at the controls I'll say something but I've never said that as as a general rule people don't grab at my controls. If the person is tall I have been known to let them know to not let their feet interfere with the rudder.

 

That's about it for me. Nice and simple and not too scary.

 

I'd be surprised if any of my passengers could land the aircraft, so I guess that's a risk, but not one I'd been thinking of because I don't put myself in a high risk health group, however anyone could choke on a mintie I guess.

 

There's no sterile cockpit in my aircraft as I want my passengers to enjoy themselves!

 

 

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I can only go by what I've been taught. That includes what not to touch, what happens on engine failure on take off, immediately after take off both above and below 500ft, actions in the event of fire, actions on forced landing, actions on ditching in water, location of ALL lifesaving devices including emergency rations, flares etc, the usual harnesses, seat adjustments etc. If I have a passenger who has never been in a small aircraft I give them a bit of a running commentary while we're flying as well, seems to put them at ease a bit more and shows them I know what all the guages and switches means.

 

I must say Ian, I've never thought of what happens if I have a heart attack or anything else that could put me out of action. I think that might freak some people out.

 

Bob

 

 

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Guest pelorus32

Just to clarify my sterile cockpit: I simply say to them that for the brief periods where we are in the circuit I try and keep chatter to a minimum and if I need to listen to a radio call I will hold up my hand if they are talking. If it's nice and quiet I don't do this, if it's busy I generally do.

 

Comes from being a bloke - my brain can't multi-task, particularly talk and think!!

 

M

 

 

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Apply the KISS principle for non aviation types - how to fasten & undo their seatbelt, how to operate door / canopy and if wearing life vests (for whatever reason) how these operate. Sound familiar to your last QANTAS/Virgin/Jetstart etc. flight?

 

There's a CASA regulation (will edit later with link...can't seem to find it at the moment...haven't had my coffee yet!) which defines the minimum information to be given for a "passenger brief" and what they tell you on an RPT flight is just that - the minimum information required to meet the most likely scenario as determined by risk management planning.

 

In my experience, those not familiar with light aircraft are generally overwhelmed by the whole experience. Keep it simple for them coz they probably won't remember half of what you tell them anyway.

 

Cheers,

 

Matt.

 

 

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Not sure whether they still do it, as I have'nt been a member for quite a few years now, but at one stage Schofields Flying Club addressed this problem for spouses and partners and anyone else interested who flew regularly, by giving them a very basic understanding of what to do, which included a few circuits with hands-on approaches. A couple of ladies I spoke to, thoroughly enjoyed it, and they felt that as a result, they would at least have a little bit better chance of being able to get back on the ground and be able to walk away, than they would have otherwise.

 

Not too many of us would would be competant in landing a commercial airliner as seen in some movies, but i'd sooner put a bit of hope in someone who at least has a bit of an understanding of what to do, rather than just sit there and wait for the till it's all over.

 

For pax that don't fly on a regular basis, casualy advise them not to touch anything, keep feet off pedals, and show them how to release seat belts, door, or canopy and knocking off the master switch after coming to stop in a emergency should suffice.

 

 

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Planedriver - a lot of schools I have seen now offer a right hand seat course which is what you have mentioned - it is a great asset I believe to our spouses that fly with us at times.

 

 

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+1

 

My wife did a PETS (partners emergency training) course a while back. It was a full day with class room instruction and about 2 hrs of dual. The ladies weren't taught how to fly, they were taught how to land. They also learned how to tune the radio, send a mayday and squawk 7700 etc etc. I feel much more comfortable knowing that she's been through the motions if the need ever arises. And on the longer flights a bit of PETS revision is a fun and valuable way to pass some time.

 

In addition to whats already mentioned, I brief my pax on looking out for other traffic and how to use the clock system with high/level/low. In the circuit area I always keep every one busy looking for traffic.

 

 

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Getting your spouse in the aircraft in the first place can at sometimes be challenging!

The real problem arises when you can't get her OUT of the aircraft.....that is an early indicator of lots of expense looming, and ultimately reduced access to 'your' precious aircraft. I'm staring down the barrel of that possibility as we speak. The J3 Cub is a cranky 60yo with some bad habits, which I do not let anybody else solo unless they already have good time on type. I can only imagine the strife when 'She Who Must Be Obeyed' waves her shiny new license at me and wants to have a go.... :confused:

 

 

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Suprisingly I've not yet seen or had anyone puke in a trike, despite the many dozens of times I've taken up relatives and friends. When asked, I have advised them to puke to the left when flying the 582 as I'd rather have steaming puke on the exhaust rather than cold puke clogging up the airfilter. Now with the 912 perhaps I'd better tell them to puke to the right to avoid contaminating the oil reserviour.

 

Puking straight ahead will result in a near aerobatic landing on the nearest postage stamp followed by immediate evacuation by the pilot.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

 

 

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Guest Graham Lea

Yeh, depends on the BMI.

 

Some time ago I heard of two blokes who did't fit an a/c sideways so they flew to Narromine with the doors open!

 

 

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Guest Graham Lea

I generally run through a talk on what to expect etc and always mention the a/craft bumps and turns so they don't get too frightened. like the pre-take on qantas ... when up there and they are feeling confidnet, I show 'em how it works for a landing ii I cark it, but don't tell them I may do that. :-) I talk a lot about where we are and what the a/c is doing and how I am in control, including gliding range etc ..

 

 

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Having the luxury of a GRS, I don't have to hope the untrained passenger would be lucky enough to pull off a good landing. I show them the basic controls and where the GRS handle is and that if I get hit by a Pelican to get the trike over a nice big open field and pull the handle.

 

Cheers,

 

Glen

 

 

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Yeh, depends on the BMI.Some time ago I heard of two blokes who did't fit an a/c sideways so they flew to Narromine with the doors open!

Nothing wrong with having big stomach bones.... just precludes you from using certain aircraft like C150's.

I wanted to do some GA training a while ago and my favorite instructor suggested that me and him in a C150 was about 4kg's overweight and we hadn't added fuel yet.....088_censored.gif.2b71e8da9d295ba8f94b998d0f2420b4.gif

 

Phil

 

 

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Suprisingly I've not yet seen or had anyone puke in a trike, despite the many dozens of times I've taken up relatives and friends. When asked, I have advised them to puke to the left when flying the 582 as I'd rather have steaming puke on the exhaust rather than cold puke clogging up the airfilter. Now with the 912 perhaps I'd better tell them to puke to the right to avoid contaminating the oil reserviour.Puking straight ahead will result in a near aerobatic landing on the nearest postage stamp followed by immediate evacuation by the pilot.

Cheers,

 

Glen

The answer is to get them to puke into their flight suit:yuk: especially if they are a student in the front seat with you instructing from the rear seat:yuk: (have not had it happen yet thank goodness)

 

 

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