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  1. A recent rash of fatal light aircraft crashes in far west New South Wales has led a former commercial airline pilot to call for more rigorous training for bush pilots. Throughout October and November there have been four serious light aircraft crashes in regional New South Wales, leading to five deaths and putting two other people in hospital. Four men died on the same day on late October, only hours apart, beginning with a gyrocopter crash in Orange killing two. Three hours later, another light aircraft went down north of Wentworth in the state's far south-west killing 20-year-old Kayden Cullinan and 22-year-old Nicholas Walters. On November 18, a 50-year-old man was killed when his aircraft crashed on a stretch of road on a property near Moree. And on November 19, a plane crashed into the ground on a property near Menindee, 100 kilometres east of Broken Hill, seriously injuring a 53-year-old man and a 47-year-old woman. They were flown to the Royal Adelaide Hospital and remain in serious but stable conditions. Paul Martin, the general manager of livestock at large pastoral producer Webster Limited, was once an airline pilot with Virgin Australia, City Jet Air in France and QantasLink in Western Australia before settling in Outback NSW. He said the spike in light aircraft crashes was taking its toll on the agricultural industry, when times were tough enough in the Outback with families battling the drought. Mr Martin, who stressed that he was not commenting on the recent crashes, is calling for improved pilot training and safety. "We've got to get really involved with the process of education and training. If we don't get this stuff sorted out, there's going to be more deaths," Mr Martin said. "There will be more people killing themselves and tearing more small communities apart." Mr Martin said he wants to see a program established to offer ongoing training to all people who fly light aircraft in regional Australia. "These bi-annual flight review programs are not enough for those who are constantly engaged in low altitude operations," he said. Mr Martin singled out gyrocopter pilots, who he said were not covered by the bi-annual flight review program that their fixed-wing compatriots must follow. Civil Aviation Safety Authority spokesman Peter Gibson said he believed there was always room for more training when dealing with light aircraft. "One of the hardest things when dealing with people in regional areas is the isolation and getting out to them to administer training where appropriate," he said. "We are committed to keeping some of the highest standards of aircraft training in the world." Photo: Gyrocopter pilots are not required to retrain throughout their career after obtaining their licence. (ABC News) The type of work that people do in light aircraft on Outback properties is imperative to being productive on the land. Bush pilots fly in dry, dusty conditions, and there are constant distractions and pressure to get the job done. "Without the aircraft in the skies things would be so much harder out here, especially in these dry times," Mr Martin said. "So we have to improve our training and education. It's a must."
  2. Turbs, when they started I believe the CASA advised them NOT to try under 95 which would have all been sorted by now but to only apply under 149 which was supposedly coming soon at the time and allows for extra SAOs but 95 doesn't without great amounts of pressure so they did what they were told and given the extra time and the then supposedly 149 allowances they were able to add extra things in the mix...they were led along a long and winding road with RAAus given them the mud map that says turn left at every intersection...think about where you would turn up if you turned left at every intersection
  3. I was actually talking to one of the directors a couple of days ago on this and yes, CASA is the culprit, one day they wanted things this way and then the next it was that way, one day day it was to 149 then it was 95 then it was back to 149 but then their 149 was changing each day and now it may not even be 149. To my knowledge ELAAA has been trying their hardest
  4. Admin

    Any Site Problems...Site Support

    No, you are doing nothing wrong...the default view I have set is to show the latest blog entries on the blogs home page. If you select the List view you can see the blogs at their top level. I can change the default view to List view if it is considered better
  5. This thread is for anyone who is having any issues, needs help on "How To Do" or has a suggestion for an enhancement with the new forum software. Any posts you make will be acted on and replied to. Your issue will be quoted in the reply with it either being fixed or an alternative solution provided. When the issue is fixed, your post and replies will remain for a short period of time as an advisory to other users. They will then be deleted as it will no longer be an issue. Enhancement suggestions will all be combined into one post so I can address them as a "Task List" that I will look into as time permits so we can build the Forums, the heart of the site to a high standard and with comprehensive features that you want and are ALL happy with. It's YOUR site so help me to help you...Thanks for your help
  6. Announcements Information sessions – proposed new GA maintenance regulations To help people interested in the development of the new general aviation maintenance regulations, we are conducting a series of information sessions 10-14 December 2018. Bankstown and Archerfield have sold out—seats are still available at Moorabbin, Parafield, Cairns, Darwin and Jandakot. Join our experts to hear what the proposed changes mean for you and have your questions answered. Registrations close 5 December 2018. Live webinar – modernising Australia’s fatigue rules Public consultation will commence soon on a draft of Modernising Australia's Fatigue Rules - proposed CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019. Now, we are conducting a live webinar on Tuesday 4 December 2018 from 7.30pm to 8.30pm (AEDT) to encourage as many of you as possible to have your say on the proposed CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019. Spread the word and encourage your aviation colleagues to be part of the conversation and register by 6pm 4 December 2018. Consultations Proposed new GA maintenance regulations Our public consultation on our proposal to develop new general aviation maintenance regulations will open on 7 December 2018. Go to our Consultation Hub to find out more and have your say before the 13 January 2019 deadline. Modernising Australia’s fatigue rules - proposed CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019 Public consultation on the proposed CAO 48.1 Instrument 2019, which aims to address 12 of the actions contained in CASAs response to the independent review of fatigue rules, will commence on 10 December 2018. Go to our Consultation Hub to find out more and have your say before the 15 January 2019 deadline. Draft CAAP 166-01 v4.2 - Operations in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes Following extensive consultation with the aviation community, we have finalised the policy in relation to the appropriate frequency to use in the vicinity of non-controlled aerodromes. Public consultation on draft CAAP 166-01 will commence on 7 December 2018. Please go to our Consultation Hub and provide your feedback on these editorial changes via our Consultation Hub by 16 January 2019. Guidance material AC 39-01 v4.2 - Airworthiness Directive We published an amended AC 39-01 v4.2 – Airworthiness Directive to update parameters for defining ADs as urgent. View the AC on the CASA website. Civil Aviation Advisory Publications We published three amended CAAPs during November. CAAP 234-1(2) - Guidelines for aircraft fuel requirements Updated to align with recent amendments to the fuel rules. Key changes include clarification of existing definitions and new definitions; inclusion of additional fuel quantity and an expanded description of methods of determining fuel quantity; inclusion of a detailed description of in-flight fuel management procedures and practices, sample fuel calculations and detailed worked examples. View the CAAP on the CASA website. CAAP 215-1(3) - Guide to the preparation of operations manuals Updated to align with the recent amendment to the fuel rules. View the CAAP on the CASA website. CAAP 43-01 v2.0 - Maintenance release Updated to reflect changes to CAO 100.5. Key changes include clarification of requirements for making or clearing an endorsement on Part 2 of a maintenance release for defects that are not a major defect; explanation of requirements relating to issuing of the CASA maintenance release outside of Australian territory; and explanation of requirements for issuing a maintenance release for an aeroplane engaged in an aerial application conducted at night if the aeroplane is not equipped and certificated for night VFR flight under Part 21 of the CASR. View the CAAP on the CASA website. Visual Flight Rules Guide We have released the 2018 print edition of the Visual Flight Rules Guide. To order your copy visit our online store. Development projects We have closed Project FS 11/39 - Post Implementation Review (PIR) of CASR Part 67 – Medical. The issues and objectives identified in Project FS 11/39 will now be addressed through Project FS 16/08 – Medical certification standards. A new Project FS 18/07 - Proposed amendments to Part 60 Manual of Standards - Synthetic training devices has been approved.
  7. For memory I think there is a clause in the contract with RAAus where they pay them to Administer the low end that they can audit for compliance every 2 years...if my memory serves me but with the mad cow setting these days I can't be sure of anything...now what was I saying??????
  8. Admin

    BLOG AWAY

    Great to see some BLOGS starting up...where is your BLOG??????
  9. Admin

    BLOG AWAY

    Well seeing I am a little stuck on some of the other great site features that are being developed for you I thought I would turn on the Recreational Flying BLOG System...now you can ramble on as much as you like in your own Blog. Building that aircraft kit? or doing a maintenance project? got a flying trip happening from planning, getting the aircraft ready, on the trip, photos, stories, people you meet and then afterthoughts...well BLOG'em and tell the world your story. You create your Blog and then create entries in your blog and other users can read about them, comment about them and create your own stories and get others interested in them...BLOG AWAY and give us something to read...enjoy Oh, and you control your blog, public or private to select individuals, add a banner picture, create a side block etc...other users can follow your travels by following your blog and all your new blog entries come up in the What's New section as well...have fun
  10. Admin

    Bertin X-8

    100hp from 8 cyl, I wonder why they made the cyl/pots so small but it would be one hell of a smooth engine when running
  11. Ok, it has been a week since we changed to the IPS platform and just about all the issues that you have come across have been resolved and everything is running well. Please if you have any issues not yet documented or resolved then please add them to the Support thread as you have always done by clicking: https://www.recreationalflying.com/topic/11989-any-site-problemssite-support/ There is a couple of initiatives still being worked on such as the What's New layout and a couple of others that some of you have highlighted so more on them when solutions have been implemented. So now we come to What's NEXT...here is your chance to give myself and Ahmed (our great resident developer) a To Do list of things you would like to be created/provided/implemented etc to increase your user satisfaction of the site. This is the most important aspect of creating an environment that will help you in getting everything you need from the site on everything to do with your flying. Please post your wish list and if possible we will get straight on to it...thanks for your understanding and your help and support of the Aircraft Pilots web site
  12. Admin

    What Now - please advise

    Hi Ahmed, the numbering isn't working properly...I just posted above and the number says #1
  13. Admin

    What Now - please advise

    Coming soon in a whole new section that is searchable and more
  14. Admin

    What Now - please advise

    Account settings and then on the right notification settings
  15. Admin

    What Now - please advise

    Yes I do however it is on the list of things to do but it is a lot harder with IPS to create
  16. Doesn't anyone fly any more? Go on, tell us about your last flight...even if it is only circuits...let's get some threads and posts started about our last flight, what did you do, what did you see, what was it like...tell us all so we can envy even just a minute in the air...............
  17. Extremely rare audio has emerged online that is believed to be of an interview with the only adult known to have spoken out about an infamous 1966 mass UFO sighting in Melbourne. On April 6, 1966 over 300 students and some staff reportedly witnessed a UFO flying silently in the sky before disappearing behind some nearby trees. Andrew Greenwood was a teacher at Westall High School when the object was spotted and is one of the only adults to have spoken about his experience. It has been 52 years since the alleged sighting but there are very few eyewitness details that have emerged in that time. Though rare audio, believed to be of an interview between Mr Greenwood and American physicist, Dr James E McDonald, may shed some light on what really happened. The sighting occurred at Westall High School in 1966.Source:Herald Sun The audio was recently published by the YouTube channel QUFOSR and claims to be a “huge piece of evidence for the case”. A link to the audio was sent to news.com.au by the owner of the channel, who believes it may be the first time the interview has been posted online. A recording of Mr McDonald describing the interview has been posted online before but audio of the actual interview is very rare. Though news.com.au cannot verify the claims it is Mr McDonald and Mr Greenwood speaking on the tape, it is still brings an interesting perspective on the baffling case. –– ADVERTISEMENT –– At the beginning of the interview Mr Greenwood told Mr McDonald that he initially brushed off the girl that ran into his classroom claiming there was a UFO outside. However, at recess time, he thought he might as well go have a look outside, purely out of curiosity, it was then that he saw about 300 students and a few teachers all gathered on the oval. “I observed the object everyone was looking at. It was grey against a blue grey sky so I didn’t see it immediately,” Mr Greenwood said. “The only thing I’ve got to compare it against is some smaller sized cessna aircraft and it was approximately two thirds the length of one of those.” He said it was hard to make out the exact shape but the best way he could describe it was a big plate with a bulge in the middle. According to Mr Greenwood, the object moved in a very strange way and was a lot faster than any other aircraft he had ever seen. “It did hover at times, it seemed to be able to accelerate and disappear out of sight and then someone would see it over in another part of the sky,” he said. “It moved a considerable distance away very rapidly and then moved back again.” At one point the object moved towards the crowd, but it moved in such a way that it was impossible to know it was moving until it was right in front of them. “It came towards us, not that we could see it actually coming towards us, but we could see that it was closer now than it was before. It would go up and down. It could move slowly, but generally it seemed to hover or move really fast,” he said. The sudden appearance of a light plane made the encounter even more bizarre, with Mr Greenwood noting the UFO seemed to be playing some sort of game with the planes. “[The plane] approached it and then tried to move around it and [the UFO] moved over to another part of the sky very rapidly. The plane followed it over and it moved back again,” he said. The sighting sparked a lot of speculation by the local paper. Picture: QUFOSR/YouTubeSource:YouTube “It seemed to be playing cat and mouse with the plane.” More planes started to arrive and by the end Mr Greenwood said there were about five planes in the sky with the object. According to the teacher the UFO was in the sky for about 25 minutes from when it was first noticed and then suddenly it just disappeared. “It just vanished. It did one of its accelerations and then no one could pick it up again. It was gone,” Mr Greenwood said. The incident understandably attracted a lot of attention from the local media, with The Dandenong Journal covering the event in great detail and running two front page stories on it. The Age also ran a small article about the sighting, writing that the unidentified object may have been a weather balloon. Even though it is the largest mass sighting in Australia to date, hardly any other newspapers made mention of the event, apart from The Sun and The Herald running a few cartoons poking fun at the claim. There were no pictures of the Westall UFO but this is a photograph of another sighting that was captured just a year before. The exact location of the photo is unknown.Source:News Corp Australia At the time, there were a lot of claims that the government was trying to get people to stop talking about the sighting, along with several; witnesses saying sharply dressed men in black suits visited them and warned them from speaking about the incident. Despite over 300 people seeing the light planes in the sky with the object, the closest airport, Moorabbin, denied having any planes in the sky at that time. “I drive past (Moorabbin) several times a day and there is never a time when there’s not planes taking off or coming in,” Mr Greenwood can be heard saying. “So I think it was rather a silly statement for them to make that at that time there were no planes in the sky.” People are still trying to figure out what exactly those 300 people saw. Picture: Supplied. Picture: SuppliedSource:Supplied When Mr Greenwood tried to speak with the physical education teacher who also witnessed the event all she would admit is that she “saw something” but then refused to speak about it anymore. He also said he was met with complete denial from the headmaster who didn’t want to hear anything about it and even accused him of being hung over and seeing things. “He is one of these people that runs his school on the book and if it’s not in the book you don’t do it. And there is nothing about how to handle UFO sightings in the book. Therefore you ignore them,” Mr Greenwood said. He said that after the incident the school received a visit from the Royal Australian Airforce but the headmaster didn’t want to hear anything they had to say and “promptly told them to get lost”. The interview offers a rare first-hand account of what may have happened that day. The sighting sparked worldwide interest, with people still debating about what those students and staff actually saw. Some believe it was definitely an alien encounter while others suspect it may have been new government technology.
  18. Admin

    What Now - please advise

    The Blogs are now open so you can create your own Builder's Blog...or any old Blog (aviation related)
  19. Admin

    What Now - please advise

    Yeah, unfortunately there is no numbering system in the threads now so you can refer to a specific post in the thread unless @Ahmed Zayed can come up with something. The only other thing you can do is put a specific link to the post you are referring to. To do this go to the post you want, click "Posted (date)" text at the top of the post, then copy the address in the browser address bar and add that in your post. So if I wanted to add a link in this post to post #3 in this thread it would be: Notice how the link turns into a "Brief" of the post and clicking the Brief will take you to post #3 I know it isn't ideal but at the moment it is all we have...maybe remind me some time down the track and I will see what I can do if @Ahmed Zayed can't come up with anything
  20. It looks more like a chicken carcass than a drone. Wishbone-thin struts hold together a skeletal scaffold that seems too fragile to fly. But don’t be fooled. It may not look it, but this design is one of the strongest among thousands of alternatives. We know because an artificial intelligence has dreamed up and tested every one of them. The use of massive computing power to conjure radical new designs automatically – a process known as generative design – is revolutionising the way human designers work, letting us build things we previously couldn’t have imagined. The technology is already designing everyday industrial components from seatbelt brackets in cars and motorbike chassis to cabin partitions in passenger aircraft. Not only are these computer-generated designs stronger and lighter than human-crafted solutions but they’re weird – designs that no human would have come up with in the first place. “The computer can really surprise you,” says Lilli Smith at Autodesk in Boston, a software design company which has several generative designs under its belt, including the unusual drone chassis. Instead of waiting for inspiration to hit, computers go looking. Handed a set of design constraints – such as making it lightweight, strong and low-cost – generative design software identifies and assesses hundreds or thousands of candidates that all fit the bill, before selecting the pick of the crop. By trawling through an exhaustive set of options, computers typically find ones that a human would have missed. Designers can simply choose from a handful that the software predicts will do the job better than the rest. Humans switch from being creators to curators. The basic idea is simple: here’s what I want, show me the best. But the software and cloud-based computing power needed to pull it off have only appeared in the last few years. For one of its first generative design projects, in 2015, Autodesk Research teamed up with the Bandito Bros, a US multimedia studio known for its wacky stunts, and asked an AI to design a car. The team wired up a custom-built off-road buggy with hundreds of sensors and raced it around the Mojave Desert. This let them capture a vast amount of data about the stresses that extreme driving placed on different parts of the vehicle. They then fed this to the generative design system with the instruction to produce something that could handle this. The resulting design, dubbed the Hack Rod, gave a glimpse of the future: more strength from less material – and alien-looking. There’s a reason generative designs look weird, as if they were the result of a natural process rather than made, says Erin Bradner at Autodesk Research in San Francisco. “The algorithm will fine tune the structure so that not a single piece of material is added that’s not needed,” she says. “Some people relate it to erosion.” Generative design combined with 3D printing allows structures to be made that were impossible before (Credit: Autodesk, Inc) This process of elimination applies not only to the amount of material in a structure but also the number of parts needed to make it. “That can mean fewer suppliers, faster assembly and fewer points of failure,” says Bradner. The trouble with favouring organic structures is that they can be hard to manufacture with traditional machines. Additive manufacturing – or 3D printing – can be used to make most shapes, but not all industries yet use it. To get around that, you can instruct the design software to generate something that can be made by certain kinds of equipment. “A designer can specify that she wants to make a part on a three-axis mill with a specific diameter cutting tool and the algorithm will only produce parts that can be made by that mill, with that cutter,” says Bradner. Manufacturing limitations become yet another design constraint that the software takes on board. “Designers are faced with a myriad of choices every day that they don’t have the time or mental resources to fully explore,” she says. “If I could make my part in aluminium or steel what would it look like? If I could manufacture by 3D printing or milling, what alternatives could I consider?” The cabin partitions in passenger aircraft can be made lighter but stronger when designed by AI (Credit: Alamy) Generative design is still a new technology, with many projects one-off experiments, such as the Hack Rod and drone. But companies like Autodesk and Frustum, based in Colorado, are starting to take the tech mainstream via collaborations with a range of major manufacturers. “We’re doing a lot of work with aerospace companies,” says Frustum’s chief executive Jesse Blankenship. When designing components for aircraft, a small reduction in weight can makes a big difference. Blankenship says his company’s software has been used to design lighter components like heat exchangers and acoustic baffling. Frustum has clients in the defence industry as well, but they’re tight-lipped about what they’re designing. “I just know they buy the software,” he says. Autodesk has also been helping aircraft lose weight. The Airbus A320 now has lightweight partitions between cabins that were designed by an AI that Autodesk Research co-developed with New York-based software company The Living. The partition’s skeletal design has rods criss-crossing at odd angles. Others have also been looking at AI’s ability to improve aircraft design. Researchers at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) have been investigating its role in helping to tune combat aircraft to specific missions. Aerospace engineers at Delft University in the Netherlands have also been developing a tool that produces conceptual aircraft designs. Airbus estimates that the new cabin partition design can save up to 465,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions a year (Credit: Airbus) It’s not only planes that benefit from being lighter. Autodesk has worked with US car maker General Motors to create a seatbelt bracket that is 40 percent lighter and 20 percent stronger than the previous version. At its annual trade show in November this year, Autodesk also showed off an AI-designed suspension system for a Mercedes-Benz Formula 1 racing car and a frame for a BMW motorcycle. Even Nasa is in on it. Next to the car and bike parts was a lander that Nasa is developing for missions to the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Autodesk’s generative design for the lander’s legs is 35 percent lighter than previous human-made designs. For David Kirsh, a cognitive scientist at the University of California, San Diego and visiting researcher at University College London’s Bartlett School of Architecture, generative design lets us outsource a kind of hands-on problem solving. Kirsh is interested in how human thinking is embedded in our physical environment. Imagine you’re putting together a jigsaw puzzle. You could try to fit all the pieces together in your head, using what we might call the mind’s eye. Or you could build it. For any puzzle with more than a handful of pieces, solving the problem with our hands rather than our head is far easier. “Cognition is a product of the interaction between brains, bodies and the world,” he says. The intritcate legs of Nasa's new interplanetary lander are nearly a third lighter than anything a human could come up with (Credit: Autodesk, Inc) Many problems can’t be solved (just) in our head at all, which is why design typically involves prototyping to see how pieces fit together and work as a whole. Here’s another example. If you have a peg that you need to fit into a tight hole you don’t study the peg and the hole and calculate how it’s going to go in. “The trick is actually to put it part-way in and then jiggle it,” says Kirsh. “There is no counterpart in the mind for jiggling.” Trying out thousands of different ways to meet a set of design constraints – like different positions for the peg in the hole – is a form of virtual jiggling But generative design could be the next best thing. Trying out thousands of different ways to meet a set of design constraints – like different positions for the peg in the hole – is a form of virtual jiggling. In fact, some design problems are a lot like puzzles. When Autodesk Research wanted to set up a new office in Toronto, they worked with The Living again to design the layout. Most offices stick to a standard floor plan, with meeting rooms in the middle or around the edges and the desks grouped together. The design generated for the Toronto office is different. As with the Hack Rod, the designers collected as much data as they could, this time about people’s working preferences – how much natural light, how much social interaction, their working hours and so on. They also noted which groups needed to be close to which other groups. The designs often appear similar to shapes and structures found in the natural world (Credit: Airbus) Feeding these constraints to the software produced hundreds of possible layouts for the office’s desks, meeting rooms and social spaces. The one that the designers picked from the few most recommended by the AI has small groups of desks interspersed with communal areas and teams arranged in a way that maximises interaction. Van Wijnen, a construction company based in the Netherlands, is doing the same thing for entire neighbourhoods. The firm has changed its entire construction process to make the most of its generative design tools. Its houses are now made from prefabricated parts, which means working out the best way for them to be built and arranged along a street becomes another puzzle. To design its neighbourhoods, Van Wijnen gives its software a large number of constraints, from the requirement that all apartments should have at least 3,000 square metres of floor space and at least one parking space to the requirement that all roof-mounted solar panels get enough sunlight and that there is a variety of different house designs in a street. For now, arranging these pre-designed pieces of a large puzzle pushes the software as far as it can go. Designing a whole house from scratch would involve many more variables – and regulations – than designing a new part for a vehicle. But eventually we might get computers to come up with new architectural designs. It might possible to teach them to design a building in the style of Le Corbusier, the famous Swiss-French architect, says Smith. Or the load-bearing structure of a skyscraper could be designed in the same way as a car chassis, which could let us build taller buildings than we ever could on our own. There is certainly an appetite for using AI in design. According to Blankenship, sportswear companies like New Balance and Adidas have started looking at generative design as a way to make personalised trainers, offering customers huge variety in the style and function of their footwear. Add in 3D printing –letting you manufacture unorthodox shapes on the spot – and you could generate your customised design on a website and have it made in the shoe shop down the street. This changes the relationship between product designers and their customers. To paraphrase Maurice Conti, who helped pioneer generative design at Autodesk before moving to experimental tech company Alpha in Barcelona: instead of making people want to buy your stuff, you invite them to make stuff they want to buy. There are of course limitations to the technology. ”It’s not magic,” says Kirsh. Some things will be harder for computers to make. For example, many of our most celebrated objects or buildings give us a particular experience or make us feel a certain way. But that’s hard to put into code. “We might not be able to pin down what causes that feeling,” says Kirsh. What’s clear is that designers have a powerful new tool and the best designs will come from a back and forth between human and machine. “Computers will do what computers are good at, people will do what people are good at,” says Bradner. “It’s a fascinating opportunity to think in new ways,” says Smith. “People think it’s going to take away their jobs but it’s going to make them so much better.” Blankenship agrees. “We could certainly get to a future where a lot of design work is fully automated,” he says. But you still want people to sign off on it. Is it any good? Is it better than the last one? Is it what we want? These are questions only a human can answer. “Otherwise what are we doing it all for? A machine without people doesn’t make any sense,” he says.
  21. Admin

    Testing out the new BLOG System

    I think we need to consider whether what we are posting is beneficial for everyone in the forums generally or specifically in our own blog, or in the photo gallery and insert the pics into our forum post or blog entry...it is going to be interesting how we all get use to the extra functionality. Having said that yes you can insert pics in your blog entries of your own blog, there is no limit at this stage, you can post a link to your blog anywhere on the internet and point others to your blog here, you can tell your own story with photos, links, quotes, etc. I can also advise that soon I will be opening the new Recreational Flying Clubs System where you can create your own club with other users with your own forums, events calendar, pic gallery, sponsors etc. You can create a club representing your flying club,, aircraft type club, specific interest club, private (invite only) or public, heck you will even be able to charge a membership to your club if you wish, you will be the moderator or you can have several administrators/moderators of your club and much much more so stay tuned for that. In the meantime Blogs are for individuals to write themselves about specific topics of interest and what's on their mind and others can add comments of which the Blog owner can moderate if necessary...hope this helps you to enjoy using the new Recreational Flying Blogs System
  22. Admin

    Testing out the new BLOG System

    Well, here we are with the new Blog System that I hope you may use to blog about whatever is on your mind you can even use the Blog system to run a complete blog on building an aircraft or whatever aviation activity that you would like to run your own blog on. YOU control your blog, YOU can make it public or private to whoever you would like to invite to see it, YOU can control what you place into it and what comments others make...so please, use the Blog System as you like, it is your own area so enjoy, and enjoy reading other user's blogs.
  23. Admin

    BLOG AWAY

    I think we try and keep it loosely aviation related for the time being however blogging about aviation politics, and we know aviation and politics can go hand in hand but this way we can keep personal political opinions out of the forums and into individual blogs...I will get around to doing a massive overhaul of the Whats Up Australia site in due course...hope that helps
  24. I am hoping to get your thoughts on the Group Icons associated with each user. The places users into groups based on who they are which we currently have groups for: Administration First Class member Member Incorrect Email Address (used to validate users) Guests Moderators You will notice under the user's name at the side of a post the group the user is in is in a box with a specific colour...Admins are Red, First Class members are Orange/Gold, standard members are Black etc. What are your thoughts on these? Should they be as they are now, or just the group title text in a colour or something else to let other users know...your thoughts?
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