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Beware of reliance on Google Earth


kaz3g

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I have just been looking at my old station, Cobra Station, in the Upper Gascoyne on Google Earth and discovered that the place they have labelled as this is actually Mt Augustus Station some 25 miles to the east.

 

The current Cobra Station Homestead is the old Bangemall Hotel which served the gold miners who tried to make a living scratching gold from the ironstone and quartz of the Bangemall Range during the 1800's. Many of them died there and are buried in the sands of the Bangemall Creek. The correct coordinates are S 24 12.01. E 116 28.14.

 

My old station diary recorded that Ernest Potts, who first settled the station, set it up to take clean skins off the larger Mt Augustus Station next door. In 1928 he went down to the south-east corner, 80 miles from the homestead, with camel team and Aboriginal helpers, and built the big cattle yards that still stand today at the "Twelve Mile". His wife, Madelaine, stayed behind with shotgun and rifle to keep the "wild blacks" at bay.

 

Mt Augustus itself was part of the Cobra Run and I convinced the WA Government to declare it a National Park. it now encompasses an area of about 12 sq miles at the north- east station boundary. Mt Augustus homestead is off the north-east corner of the Mt on the road to Meekatharra.

 

I have tried to tell Google of the error but they make it nigh on impossible to contact them.

 

Beware relying on their "points of interest"... You could perish in the process!

 

Kaz

 

 

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There are private companies who supply the data to Google - Springsure had so many errors and the Council had just changed the name of several roads, so I contacted them and supplied them with GPS plots with road names etc (5 years ago). Unfortunately I can't remember their names. Would have been a hard job doing the conversion from our mapping system to theirs and most never made it to Google maps. Major errors on Springsure town - the railway station is in the wrong location, the two highways through town are incorrectly named and both are in the wrong location (local roads), lots of roads are either incorrectly named, in the wrong location, or mapped where there is no road, or omitted where there was a road. Some business addresses came from the phone book - hence the Rugby field is at a private house, the bakery is listed even though it hasn't been a bakery for over 10 years. And the list goes on...... The RACQ does a better job - they send through maps for updates every year or so - provided there is someone knowledgeable and diligent at Council, they get updated.

 

Road works Sue

 

 

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I'd never have picked you for a cattle duffer Kaz

I learned a few survival rules, TP...and the etiquette off the bush.

 

1. Never leave the ears or hide from a killer where a nosy neighbour can check them;

 

2. Don't leave calves with your brands on them in the same paddock as your neighbour's cows; and

 

3. Always compliment your neighbour's wife on how well your beef has been cooked when you visit for dinner.

 

Kaz

 

 

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I learned a few survival rules, TP...and the etiquette off the bush.1. Never leave the ears or hide from a killer where a nosy neighbour can check them;

 

2. Don't leave calves with your brands on them in the same paddock as your neighbour's cows; and

 

3. Always compliment your neighbour's wife on how well your beef has been cooked when you visit for dinner.

 

Kaz

Most outback dunnies have irretrievable ear tags

 

 

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If you go to google maps instead of google earth (maps.google.com.au) and right click anywhere on the map, one of the options is "Report a problem" where you can describe what is wrong and ask to be emailed when the issue is resolved. This solution presupposes two things; a) that google maps and google earth share the same database, and b) that you'll ever get an email back... 078_pc_revenge.gif.92f2d38a0e662b2e0b6cba4dc0ba5c35.gif

 

 

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Most outback dunnies have irretrievable ear tags

Hi Phil

 

Out where I was, they had earmarks and brands. Trouble was, certain neighbours would take a big slice out of the ear (thereby removing the earmark) and brands fade or can be fudged.

 

You got to know who was coming over the boundary on horse or motorbike by themself and going back with Four-footed companions some time later, and there was almost always an a opportunity to even the score.

 

With a killer of dubious ancestry, a 12" long stick used to give the ears a judicious poke up the now unused rectum usually did the trick :-)

 

Kaz

 

 

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Hi PhilOut where I was, they had earmarks and brands. Trouble was, certain neighbours would take a big slice out of the ear (thereby removing the earmark) and brands fade or can be fudged.

 

You got to know who was coming over the boundary on horse or motorbike by themself and going back with Four-footed companions some time later, and there was almost always an a opportunity to even the score.

 

Years ago we gave a country Sargent a retiring farewell He asked a local butcher where he hid the brand of the beast that he had bush killed on the common just out of town. As he was retiring he said he would take no further action but this had worried him over the years as he had searched All the surrounding area, the butchers cart, harness etc. Old Jack after getting the sargents word told the story

 

"I saw the dust from you push bike, cut out the brand, put it on the end of the steel and shoved it up as far as it would go."

 

"Only bloody place I never looked"

 

They had a beer together and the Sargent and Jack lived happily ever after

 

True story

 

Phil

 

With a killer of dubious ancestry, a 12" long stick used to give the ears a judicious poke up the now unused rectum usually did the trick :-)

 

Kaz

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There are private companies who supply the data to Google - Springsure had so many errors and the Council had just changed the name of several roads, so I contacted them and supplied them with GPS plots with road names etc (5 years ago). Unfortunately I can't remember their names. Would have been a hard job doing the conversion from our mapping system to theirs and most never made it to Google maps. Major errors on Springsure town - the railway station is in the wrong location, the two highways through town are incorrectly named and both are in the wrong location (local roads), lots of roads are either incorrectly named, in the wrong location, or mapped where there is no road, or omitted where there was a road. Some business addresses came from the phone book - hence the Rugby field is at a private house, the bakery is listed even though it hasn't been a bakery for over 10 years. And the list goes on...... The RACQ does a better job - they send through maps for updates every year or so - provided there is someone knowledgeable and diligent at Council, they get updated.Road works Sue

Google Maps have a section where you can type out the correction and post it. Our road was incorrect, and they corrected it in about 6 months - not bad for a world wide organization.

 

 

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I learned a few survival rules, TP...and the etiquette off the bush.1. Never leave the ears or hide from a killer where a nosy neighbour can check them;

 

2. Don't leave calves with your brands on them in the same paddock as your neighbour's cows; and

 

3. Always compliment your neighbour's wife on how well your beef has been cooked when you visit for dinner.

 

Kaz

Now Kaz, just how useful was your time in the bush in preparing you for a career in law?

 

My Grandfather used to tell a story that used to be lore in the Kimberley. Some station owners invited one of their neighbours over for a Sunday roast. At the conclusion of the meal the host enquired of his neighbour had he enjoyed the beef?

 

"Yes, it was a very nice bit of beef" the guest replied.

 

"Well, it has probably been a long time since you ate some of your own meat"!!

 

 

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