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Oddball, Experimental, or One-off


red750

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That would cost $5-600.00 today in a 50 year old C172. The median gross salary last year was $65,000 which translates into a monthly net income of $4,344.00 so more than half of your net income would go on flying training every week.

 

In the 70s a fairly modern 172 cost I think $22.00 an hour. I can't remember what my take home pay was but I think it was less than $100.00 a week

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The Chippie was probably only 13 years old.  There were 3 or 4 of them. It was the beginning of the 60's and because of my youth and tertiary education (Teaching) I  got a subsidy as a possible air force trainee/ callup. I paid about 4Pounds  five shilling / HR  subsidised from about 5 pound ten say 20% off. . At the same time I could hire a pretty Clapped out Auster from Illawarra FS for 2 pound ten/ Hr solo at Bankstown. This was abut HALF the Hourly cost.. That PLANE is still Flying. as of about 8 years ago.  The DHC-1 was dual rate. At about 100 Hours TT I got awarded a flight test by DCA examiner, a Commonwealth Gov't  Flying scholarship to CPL Plus Instructor Rating providing a similar discount. where I HAD to make an Undertaking I would apply for a job in the Industry as they reckoned they were short of pilots at the time. In the time It took to finish there were hardly any Jobs available. That's HOW these things go. I just managed a job by a whisker and there were None after that for about 5 years in the airlines.. 

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The Emsco B-8 was a two-seat, single-engine, low-wing, twin boom experimental aircraft designed by Charles F. Rocheville in 1930 while he was vice president of Emsco Aircraft Corporation, Long Beach, California.

 

Despite its name 'Flying Wing' the aircraft carried a twin-boom empennage with a single vertical fin. The two crew sat in open tandem cockpits in a central nacelle with circular cross-section, initially with a 165 hp (123 kW) Continental A-70 in tractor configuration. The nacelle ended in a jet-engine like 'exhaust' nozzle at its rear, which actually was an intake to a boundary-layer bleed system driven by the engine which blew air through spanwise slots in the rear part of the 'Flying Wing' in an attempt to increase the wing's performance. Another unusual characteristic of the design was its “reversed tricycle landing gear” with two main wheels under the front wing and a single aft wheel under the rear-end of the nacelle.

 

EmscoB-8FlyingWing.jpg.830485af6e3c84ea01727e8858f96a6a.jpg

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The Short SC.1 was the first British fixed-wing vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) jet aircraft. It was developed by Short Brothers. It was powered by an arrangement of five Rolls-Royce RB.108 turbojets, four of which were used for vertical flight and one for conventional horizontal flight. The SC.1 had the distinction of being the first British fixed-wing VTOL aircraft and the first one to transition between vertical and horizontal flight modes; it was also the first VTOL-capable aircraft with a fly-by-wire control system.

 

The SC.1 was designed and produced in response to a Ministry of Supply (MoS) requirement for a suitable aircraft for conducting flight studies into VTOL flight, as well as specifically into the transition between vertical and horizontal flight. Two prototypes were used for flight testing between 1957 and 1971. Research data from the SC.1 test programme contributed to the development of the Hawker Siddeley P.1127 and the subsequent Hawker Siddeley Harrier, the first operational VTOL aircraft.

 

In October 2012, the Short SC.1 received Northern Ireland's first Engineering Heritage Award as a recognition of its significant achievement in the engineering field.

 

 

short sc1 01.jpg

short sc1 02.jpg

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The Scaled Composites Model 133-4.62 ATTT, or Advanced Technology Tactical Transport was a technology demonstration project built by Burt Rutan's Scaled Composites in 1986 under contract to DARPA.

 

In the mid-1980s, the American government agency DARPA, developed a concept for a tandem wing STOL transport, intended to act as a technology demonstrator and to meet a requirement for a long-range high-speed transport for US special forces, intended to fill the gap between helicopters and larger transport aircraft such as the C-130 Hercules. In 1986, DARPA placed a contract with Scaled Composites, a company set up by Burt Rutan and owned by Beechcraft to build prototypes for advanced aircraft, for a 62% scale proof-of-concept demonstrator for the concept, called the Advanced Technology Tactical Transport (shortened to ATTT or AT3).

 

The ATTT had high-aspect ratio tandem wings, which were joined by long nacelles which carried the aircraft's engines, tractor configuration turboprops, large fuel tanks and the as well as the main undercarriage units for the aircraft's retractable tricycle landing gear. As first built, it had a conventional, cruciform tail. A novel arrangement of eight fast acting fowler flaps was fitted, inboard and outboard of the engines on each of the wings. These would be extended rearwards in a low-drag configuration prior to commencing the take-off run then quickly lowered to increase lift at the point of take-off. The aircraft was of composite construction, mainly glassfibre and carbon fibre. It was powered by two Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-135 turboprops.

 

he ATTT demonstrator made its maiden flight on December 29, 1987 from Mojave Airport, base of Scaled Composites. It completed its initial test program of 51 test flights, with a total of 112 flying hours, on November 8, 1988. It was then rebuilt with a revised tail, with a twin-boom configuration replacing the original single cruciform tail unit, with the fuselage shortened and a rear-loading ramp fitted. The revised layout improved handling, lowering minimum single-engine safety speed (which was previously significantly higher than the stall speed). A further 13 test flights were flown to evaluate the revised layout.

 

The aircraft has been de-registered and is currently in storage at the Air Force Flight Test Center Museum at Edwards Air Force Base.

 

ScaledCompositesModel13301.thumb.jpg.9d72b7d51a7c7d9e6d0cbb107fe3f76f.jpg

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The Ilyushin Il-20 was a Soviet prototype for a heavily armored ground-attack aircraft to replace the Ilyushin Il-10. It featured a number of innovative concepts including a cockpit mounted on top of the engine, directly behind the propeller, and wing-mounted autocannon that could be adjusted on the ground to fire level or depressed 23° to allow the aircraft to strafe ground targets while remaining in level flight. However it was slower than the Il-10, and its M-47 engine was problematic in flight tests in 1948–49. It was not placed into production. The test pilots called the aircraft the Gorbach (Hunchback). Onnly the prototype was built.

 

Ilyushin's concept to meet the 1947 requirement for a superior aircraft to the Il-10 in performance and firepower was a heavily armored, single-engine, all-metal, low-wing monoplane powered by the newly developed M-47—also known as the MF-45Sh or M-45Sh—liquid-cooled engine, which developed 3,000 horsepower (2,200 kW) at takeoff. The design's most notable feature was the pilot's cockpit mounted directly above the engine, reminiscent of the Blackburn Blackburn and Blackburn Cubaroo. Furthermore, the cockpit was situated directly behind the four-bladed propeller to maximize pilot visibility. The windshield extended down to the propeller hub and provided the pilot with a 37° downward field of view; in a medium dive he could view targets directly underneath the aircraft.

 

Read more here.

 

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The Ilyushin Il-102 was a Soviet experimental jet-powered ground-attack aircraft designed by Ilyushin. Once described as the "most gorgeously ugly combat jet ever," this aircraft was never chosen for production, being surpassed by the Su-25. Only a few development prototypes were built.

 

In 1967, the Soviet Air Forces drew up a specification for a jet-powered shturmovik or armoured ground attack aircraft. While Sukhoi designed an all-new single seat aircraft, the Su-25, Ilyushin proposed a modified version of their Il-40 of 1953 under the designation Il-42, which, unlike the Sukhoi, was a two-seat aircraft with a remotely-controlled rear gun turret. The design was rejected by the Soviet Air Forces, but Ilyushin decided to continue in-house development regardless, renaming the programme Il-102.

 

The Il-102 first prototype flew on 25 September 1982, with a second airframe built for static tests, and carried out 250 test flights until it was grounded in 1984 when the engine life expired.

 
The Il-102 was a low-winged monoplane with moderately swept (30 degrees) wings, powered by two Klimov RD-33I turbofans (non-afterburning versions of the engines that power the Mikoyan MiG-29 fighter). It was highly unusual for its time in having a rear gun turret, something not seen in ground-attack aircraft since the World War II Il-2 Shturmovik and Il-10, the Il-102's spiritual ancestors, controlled remotely by a gunner sitting in a cockpit above the trailing edge of the wing. The crew cockpits, engines and fuel tanks were armoured to protect against ground fire.

 

Read more here.

 

Il102prototype1.thumb.jpg.d359d59c1cf3bd0dd31809527e5ee85b.jpgIl102prototype2.thumb.jpg.6f267fd39a31e51217c55a5f4e955ecf.jpg

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The Sukhoi S-70 Okhotnik-B (Russian: Сухой С-70 "Охотник", lit. 'Hunter'), also referred to as Hunter-B, is a Russian stealth heavy unmanned combat aerial vehicle (UCAV) being developed by Sukhoi and Russian Aircraft Corporation MiG as a sixth-generation aircraft project. The drone is based on the earlier Mikoyan Skat, designed by MiG, and encompassing some technologies of the fifth-generation Sukhoi Su-57 fighter jet. In the future, it is planned to act under the control of pilots of Su-57 jets, similarly to the USAF Skyborg programme.

 

The Okhotnik's design is based on the flying-wing scheme and incorporates use of composite materials and stealth coatings, making the drone low-observable in flight. It has a weight of about 20 tons and a wingspan around 65 feet (20 m). The drone is powered either by a single AL-31F turbofan, as used on the Sukhoi Su-27 fighter aircraft, or by the improved AL-41F derivative installed on Su-35S fighters and Su-57 prototypes. Although the first prototype's exhaust nozzle was conventional and could increase the drone's radar signature, future upgrade could see improved exhaust as well as engine inlet as shown by a mock up at the 2019 MAKS International Aviation and Space Salon. The maximum speed of the drone is reportedly 1,000 km/h while carrying its payload internally. It is likely the Okhotnik was designed to act as a "loyal wingman" controlled by the Su-57. The aircraft bears some visual resemblance to RQ-170. It is speculated that the Russian engineers could have had access to the one that was captured by Iranians, but similar design of flying-wing Mikoyan Skat was in development since 2005 and Okhotnik is a further development by Sukhoi of the former MiG design. The second prototype received a flat jet nozzle. Under development, two prototypes built.

 

 

S-70-1-Okhotnik 01.jpg

S-70-1-Okhotnik 02.jpg

S-70-1-Okhotnik 03.jpg

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The Beechcraft XA-38 "Grizzly" was a World War II-era ground attack aircraft, developed by Beechcraft, but never put into production. The Grizzly was to have been fitted with a forward-firing 75 mm cannon to penetrate heavily armored targets.

 

While the first prototype flew on 7 May 1944, testing established that the type would not be ready for the projected invasion of Japan. It also featured the Wright R-3350 engines already in use with the Boeing B-29 Superfortress—which had priority. Consequently, the XA-38 was canceled after a second prototype had been completed.

 

The United States Army Air Forces awarded the Beech Aircraft Corporation a contract in December 1942 for two prototypes for their Model 28 "Destroyer". Initially the Model 28 had been a bomber-destroyer design but shifted[citation needed] to give a powerful ground attack aircraft to replace the Douglas A-20 Havoc, with the ability to hit "hardened" targets like tanks and bunkers and to attack coastal shipping. This capability was achieved through a 75 mm cannon with 20 rounds, mounted in a fixed position on the nose as well as two .50 cal (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine guns firing forward. Defensive armament consisted of remotely controlled ventral and dorsal turrets, each armed with twin .50 cal (12.7 mm) machine guns. There were to be two crew members, a pilot and an observer/gunner in the rear cabin, using periscope sights to aim the guns.

 

TheBeechcraftXA-3802.thumb.jpg.74e539f532343781f9816f8e093592ac.jpgTheBeechcraftXA-3801.thumb.jpg.de5ce8f09bcd8b77872465a1ec97dd0d.jpg

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This is an odd one. The photo was posted on Facebook. It is a Cessna Caravan with two engines and bears the title Twin Caravan on the fin. It differs from the SkyCourier in that it has rectangular windows and the horizontal stabiliser is below the fin rather than the top. The Caravan II is a low wing aircraft, and I cannot locate any details on the internet regarding a Twin Caravan. I imagine it is a private development. If you find any details, please DM me.

 

CessnaTwinCaravan.thumb.jpg.70b7b5e4def58aefb71d72f69d6f6bc5.jpg

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The Piper PA-32-3M was experimental modification of a Cherokee Six, adding an engine to each wing, making it a trimotor. The only notes on it that I can find is this reference in the variants of the Cherokee Six.

PA-32-3M

"PA-32 prototype modified as a three-engined aircraft with two 115-hp Lycoming O-235 engines fitted to the wings, for development of the PA-34 Seneca"

 

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The Yakovlev Yak-200 was a prototype Soviet multi-engine trainer built during the 1950s. A modified version was built as the Yak-210 for navigator training, but only one example of each was built before the program was cancelled in 1956.

 

yak21001.thumb.jpg.7537743b21e61923ee1b807bc5a73b3b.jpg

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The Northrop Grumman Firebird is an intelligence gathering aircraft designed by Northrop Grumman's subsidiary Scaled Composites which can be flown remotely or by a pilot. At Scaled, it is known as the Model 355. It was unveiled on May 9, 2011. It was first flown in February 2010 and is considered to be an optionally piloted vehicle (OPV).

 

In April 2022, Northrop Grumman announced it had suspended production of the Firebird, having failed to secure any export customers for the aircraft. However, company representatives left open the possibility of future production, stating that the aircraft would "remain available for interested customers." Only one had been built.

 

 

Northrop-Grumman-Firebird.jpg

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The Boeing Skyfox is an American twin-engined jet trainer aircraft, a highly upgraded development of the Lockheed T-33. It was designed as a primary trainer to compete with and replace the Cessna T-37 Tweet. Besides its primary role as a trainer, the aircraft was envisioned to have other roles as well, including ground attack. The program was started by the Skyfox Corporation in 1983, and was acquired by Boeing in 1986.

 

The program included the replacement of the Allison J33-A-35 turbojet by two Garrett TFE731-3A turbofans. It also included an extensive redesign of the airframe. Only one prototype aircraft was built, and the program was later canceled due to lack of customers.

 

 

Boeing Skyfox 02.jpg

Boeing Skyfox 01.jpg

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On 29/04/2024 at 11:12 PM, red750 said:

This is an odd one. The photo was posted on Facebook. It is a Cessna Caravan with two engines and bears the title Twin Caravan on the fin. It differs from the SkyCourier in that it has rectangular windows and the horizontal stabiliser is below the fin rather than the top. The Caravan II is a low wing aircraft, and I cannot locate any details on the internet regarding a Twin Caravan. I imagine it is a private development. If you find any details, please DM me.

 

CessnaTwinCaravan.thumb.jpg.70b7b5e4def58aefb71d72f69d6f6bc5.jpg

Thats a not very well done Photoshop

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The Douglas A2D Skyshark was an American turboprop-powered attack aircraft built by the Douglas Aircraft Company for the United States Navy. The program was substantially delayed by engine reliability problems, and was canceled because more promising jet attack aircraft had entered development and the smaller escort carriers the A2D was intended to utilize were being phased out.

 

While it resembled the AD Skyraider, the A2D was different in a number of unseen ways. The 5,100-equivalent shaft horsepower (3,800 kW) Allison XT40-A2 engine had more than double the horsepower of the Skyraider's R-3350. The XT40 installation on the Skyshark used contra-rotating propellers to harness all the available power. Wing root thickness decreased from 17% to 12%, while both the height of the tail and its area grew.

 

Twelve Skysharks were built, two prototypes and ten pre-production aircraft. Most were scrapped or destroyed in accidents, and only one has survived.

 

 

Douglas Skyshark 02.jpg

Douglas Skyshark 01.jpg

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The Lockheed CL-760 LARA, standing for Light Armed Reconnaissance Aircraft, was conceived in the 1960s, this aircraft was Lockheed’s answer to the U.S. Army’s need for a novel kind of light tactical aircraft.

 

It was envisioned to fulfill multiple roles such as reconnaissance, close air support, and interdiction missions. The CL-760 project serves as a testament to the advancement of military aviation technology and strategies during the Cold War period, as well as showcasing Lockheed’s capacity for innovative aircraft design.

 

The 1960s were a period of rapid advancement in military aviation technology, fueled by the tensions of the Cold War. The United States military, particularly the Army, sought to enhance its tactical capabilities with aircraft that could provide close support to ground troops, perform reconnaissance, and engage in light strike missions. This period saw the development of several aircraft designed to fulfill similar roles, such as the OV-10 Bronco and the Cessna A-37 Dragonfly.

 

The CL-760 lost out to the OV-10 Bronco.

 

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Hasn't got a lot of wing but most of it is blown  by the propwash. They haven't bothered to contra rotate the Props either.   Nev

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The Horten H.XIII was an experimental flying wing aircraft designed by the Horten brothers during World War II.

 

The H.XIIIa was an unpowered glider with wings swept backwards at 60°. It was a technology demonstrator to examine the low speed handling of highly swept wings, for the development of a jet fighter which was expected to exceed Mach 1, the H.XIIIb. The small bit in the centre of the trailing edge is the cockpit.

 

HortonH.jpg.de6ddd5f131527cd140bb85656316b6e.jpg

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The Convair YB-60 was a prototype heavy bomber built by Convair for the United States Air Force in the early 1950s. It was a purely jet-powered development of Convair's earlier mixed-power B-36 Peacemaker.

 

On 25 August 1950, Convair issued a formal proposal for a swept-winged version of the B-36 with all-jet propulsion. The Air Force was sufficiently interested that on 15 March 1951, it authorized Convair to convert two B-36Fs (49-2676 and 49-2684) as the B-36G. Since the aircraft was so radically different from the existing B-36, the designation was soon changed to YB-60.

 

The YB-60 had 72% parts commonality with its piston-engined predecessor. The fuselages of the two aircraft were largely identical although the radar and bombing systems were located in a removable nose section as a result of the poor reliability of the B-36 installation. For initial flight testing a more streamlined nose with an instrumented boom was fitted; a wedge-shaped insert was added just outboard of the main landing gear to increase wing sweep and the tail surfaces were swept to match. The swept wings also used many B-36 parts. A steerable tail wheel was added to prevent the aircraft tipping backwards. It was not necessarily extended when on the ground but depended on how the aircraft was loaded.

 

Convair YB-60 serial number 49-2676 made its maiden flight on 18 April 1952, piloted by Beryl Erickson. The Boeing YB-52 beat the Convair aircraft into the air by three days. The YB-60 was approximately 100 mph (160 km/h) slower than the YB-52 and also had significant handling problems, due to its controls having been designed for slower operating speeds. It did carry a heavier bomb load — 72,000 lb (33,000 kg) against 43,000 lb (20,000 kg) for the YB-52 — but the Air Force did not see the need for the extra capacity, given the YB-60's other drawbacks. Later, "big belly" modifications increased the B-52's bomb load to 60,000 pounds (27,000 kg). The flight test programs were canceled on 20 January 1953, with 66 flying hours accumulated. The second prototype was nearing completion but its engines had not been installed and other equipment installations had not been completed. Since Convair completed their prototype contract satisfactorily, both YB-60s were formally accepted by the Air Force in 1954. The operational aircraft never flew again, and both airframes were scrapped by July.

 

 

Convair YB-60 01.jpg

Convair YB-60 02.jpg

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The Fairchild Dornier 728/928 family was a series of jet-powered regional airliners that was being developed by German-American aviation conglomerate Fairchild Dornier.

 

It was a relatively ambitious bid to develop a group of aircraft that would have seated between 50 and 110 passengers, supplementing the existing 328JET series, a smaller regional jet. The 728/928 family is a monoplane design with fixed wings in low wing configuration and two engines mounted under the wings. It has a retractable undercarriage (or landing gear) in tricycle configuration. On 21 March 2002, the roll-out of the first 728 took place. The company planned its maiden flight to occur during the summer of 2002 and for deliveries to commence during mid-2003 to the launch customer Lufthansa Cityline.

 

During July 2003, D'Long International Strategic Investment Group of Xinjiang, China showed an interest in purchasing a stake the project. A new entity, Fairchild Dornier Aeroindustries, was formed with the aim of completing development of the aircraft, however, this company also filed for bankruptcy during 2004. During this brief revival, no additional aircraft were produced, although structural tests in Dresden were commenced during 2003.

Number built    3 prototypes built to various stages of completion

 

928
Planned to follow the 728 into service, the 928 had a stretched fuselage that would have enabled the aircraft to achieve a passenger capacity of 95 to 110 seats. The first flight was scheduled for late 2003 with entry into service in 2005. The 928 featured an increased wing span and more powerful GE CF-34-10 engines. A 928-100 version, as well as a 928-200 version that had an increased maximum takeoff weight (MTOW), was planned.

 

 

Fairchild Dornier 728 Family 01.jpg

Fairchild Dornier 728 Family 02.jpg

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The Heinkel He 118 was a prototype German monoplane dive bomber design that lost out to the Junkers Ju 87 Stuka in the 1930s, and was never ordered by the Luftwaffe.

 

he118.thumb.jpg.e7e4e052e3c52db1b79abfeac65a6321.jpg

 

 

 

 

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