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Microlight engine failure at 300ft ....England


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Carrier landing without the carrier.

 

Walked away alive to fly another day, can't really criticized the chap as a bent plane is better than a bent person, yeah could have been done better but we weren't in his situation.

 

Good job overall mate, your alive and that's all that matters to your family and friends and the rest of the flying fraternity.

 

Alf

 

 

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I've looked at it a couple of times and can't see anything other than that. He didn't look too stressed out, to me . Surprisingly little forward stick to counteract power loss. You can calculate the sink rate if the height stated is correct. All seems about right. Nev

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

Xair.....least he found a clear area and headed for it. Seems like he kept control of the aircraft....a little fast at the end though .......any landing you walk away from, and he did walk away !....................Maj.....014_spot_on.gif.1f3bdf64e5eb969e67a583c9d350cd1f.gif

 

 

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yea. Ive stopped them before with the fuel cock and they tend to splutter and surge for a moment. Well, under those conditions they do. This one clearly stopped well before the prop stopped rotating. You can deffinately hear the prop windmilling.

 

 

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I don't recommend shutting a two stroke down with fuel tap. They will lean right out . Switches off won't do it properly either as they will often continue running (badly) without ignition, if on high power. You can do it after idle. ( normal) Nev

 

 

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I don't recommend shutting a two stroke down with fuel tap. ( normal) Nev

Thats good advice. We have had to do it during maintenance when doing other stuff. I dont stop 2 strokes in flight. Ive always been suss on them, I reckon if they are going, keep em that way!!! 4 strokes are a different matter:)

 

 

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IF there's a fire you would do it but it's hard on the motor, when it's been running at high power. Maintenance wise you have to prove the fuel TAP? does it's job from time to time. Generally with four 4 strokes I prefer to run them dry with a fast idle and cut the ignition as they run out of fuel. The 912 is a special case as the thing clunks in the drive and is better idled as slow as possible before cutting the ignition. Some even run it on one mag to slow it down a bit more.

 

With the two strokes, if you are using premix and don't drain the carb bowl(s) the congealed oil , when the petrol evaporates, could give you real trouble if the plane is not flown regularly. Nev

 

 

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i disagree my two stroke are as reliable as any four banger ' i had three with out a problem 'over 17 years never an engine fail comes back to maintains and proper engine management works for me

No engines should be stopped in flight, unless under certain conditions and with a Chief. I know the late ones are very reliable. Its just they can be tricky to start, and ive never really felt comfortable stopping one in flight.

 

 

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True. I recall an airtest that had to have each engine feathered and restarted as part of the whole schedule. The first engine would not come out of feather, so no other done at that time. Engine was fine, but there are always other factors that come into it.

 

In the PPL course long ago there was an engine stop and airstart exercise without started motor being used. Needed vertical dive to do it in the DHC-1.. I don't know if it had any practical purpose, except experience of the event. You will hit VNE easily, so it's a bit impractical. Nev

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard
No engines should be stopped in flight, unless under certain conditions and with a Chief. I know the late ones are very reliable. Its just they can be tricky to start, and ive never really felt comfortable stopping one in flight.

Motz, I have shut down 582s many times in flight, and performed restarts afterwards with no problems. (Key start) After shutting an engine down you straight away set it up for a restart (ign back on, choke on, prime if you have one). Never had one fail to start right up again. Or just fly it right to the strip dead stick, which is great practise for that time when the real thing happens. In my experience most aircraft fly better without the prop spinning, as you don't have dirty air going all over the fuselage or tail surfaces.

 

Golden rule !!...I have never shut down without being over the top of a large airport, often with multiple runways, or well within shooting distance of a good suitable landing site. I haven't never shut the Lightwing down, but that's not to say I would have a problem doing it, if the proper opportunity arose.

 

To know how to fly your aircraft well with the prop stopped helps your chances if it stops unexpectedly. It is also a great exercise in judgement, constantly adjusting your approach and descent, to keep within the 'survival cone' with never any doubt that you will end up where you have chosen........Maj.....

 

 

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No engines should be stopped in flight, unless under certain conditions and with a Chief. I know the late ones are very reliable. Its just they can be tricky to start, and ive never really felt comfortable stopping one in flight.

i have never shut down in flight never need two

 

 

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It is harder to stop a Gypsy or Continental/ Lyc because as Kaz says they just keep turning over (windmilling) and often the pilot needs to do an entry to spin type manoeuver in the correct direction relative to the prop rotation. If you have a 'soft' motor compression wise it will gradually "leak" over anyhow and once she has started rotating slightly you have got it usually. Starting on the starter is easy. Note I don't think you would ever airstart a 912 without the starter.. The prop is effectively geared UP to the engine and they usually have plenty of compression. This exercise might have had some validity when low compression non starter equipped motors were around and you might run a tank dry accidently, but today I think it is a bit academic. Shutting an engine down completely exposes the engine to a fair bit of shock cooling. Where cooling shutters are fitted you should close them straight away..

 

Doug I never do it either and it is supposed to be with the CFI, if it is practiced. I believe. Nev

 

 

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This bloke has done extremely well.

 

I have been told he is a 30hr student pilot on his second solo. He had to put it in early or he would have cleaned up a heard of cattle and if he had tried to go over the cattle he would of been under power lines.....well done mate:thumb up:

 

jason

 

 

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Typical TWO stroke stoppage symptoms. By the time any noises start, it's pretty much all over. I'm not anti two stroke in saying this. They have their place. Good power to weight ratio. Nev

Hmmm Nev, i thought it sounded like a four stroke it certainly looked like one through the windscreen:scratching head:

jason

 

 

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