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Blackhawk takes out Cirrus


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In certain calm conditions the wake vortices last quite a while. They all move with the airmass.( Something worth remembering). Fly above and or upwind of the path of the preceding aircraft. The heavier and slower it is the more caution needed. Nev

 

 

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Those Blackhawks move a lot of air Chinooks are even worse. This is a good example why rotary wings should not use runways and operate from a remote area of the airport.

 

pilot should have fired the chute just for effect, bit like when the airbag goes off a minute after Homer prangs the car.

 

 

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was it wake turbulence, or the cirrus pilot stalled and spun while attempting a go around... quite a long time passed between the chopper departing and the cirrus arriving

30 seconds is the gap. They make you wait 2 minutes behind a heavy at major airports.

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Have seen wake vortices sit in the same place for at least 30 seconds to almost a minute, but usually from a LARGE aircraft, and generally in fairly still conditions.

 

Watching the dust movement after the crash, I feel most of the vortex would have dissipated by the time the Cirrus arrived.

 

Would tend to lean more towards the pilot attempting a go-round and getting caught in the pitch-up and torque roll couple.

 

Damn lucky to get out of it...

 

 

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The Blackhawk is a powerful and fairly sizeable helicopter. It is classified "M" (medium) for wake turbulence. This is the same wake turbulence classification as a Boeing 737.

 

30 seconds is nowhere near enough. Not even close, for a light aircraft doing anything behind a "medium" or a "heavy" aircraft.

 

Refer AIP Enroute 1.4 for more information. The absolute bare-bones minimum wake turbulence separation is 2 minutes. It increases from that, depending on the circumstances.

 

You just have to know that. The Blackhawk did not "take out" the Cirrus - all aircraft produce wake of varying degrees and that's not the Blackhawk pilot's fault. The Cirrus pilot did not account for the wake turbulence and flew right into it.

 

 

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Have seen wake vortices sit in the same place for at least 30 seconds to almost a minute, but usually from a LARGE aircraft, and generally in fairly still conditions.Watching the dust movement after the crash, I feel most of the vortex would have dissipated by the time the Cirrus arrived.

Would tend to lean more towards the pilot attempting a go-round and getting caught in the pitch-up and torque roll couple.

 

Damn lucky to get out of it...

I have quite a few hours in Cirrus aircraft. They are quite powerful and fast compared to a Cessna 172 but to suggest that a simple go around would result in what happened to this aircraft is very far fetched. It is not a Mustang or Corsair! If you open up the throttle on a go around it will want to pitch up a bit but very easily controlled and yaw easily controlled with rudder. The Blackhawk is a very powerful twin turbine helicopter that beats the air into submission and leaves lots of turbulence. Dutchroll is correct in my opinion.

 

 

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  • 8 months later...

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