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I am currentlt visiting the US and was wondering whether my RAAUS qualifications are recognized here. Also was wondering what qualification rec pilots have here. Is it like we have in Oz, a "pilot certificate" or do rec pilots here just have PPLs?

Would any Americans on the forum care to have a stab at this?

 

 

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From my experience which is now 6 years out of date:

 

RAAus certificate means nothing to a registered aircraft

 

UK NPPL(m) means nothing as it’s a sub ICAO licence

 

My oz PPL allowed me to get into a plane as a joy flight only ... didn’t have homeland security clearance to actually pilot. 

 

To deal with it I did my US medical and got security cleared and did my US pilots certificate ... which with experience took 10 hours instruction and cross country. 

 

In the USA your oz RAAus option are the licence and rego free part 103 ultralights... and their owners do not like lending them and they can’t be hired so you have to buy one.  I didn’t have a place to store on in NYC and Connecticut where I lived so I just did my USA licence. 

 

 

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 If you "desire " something that is recognised  widely  believe me you will regret it as freedoms always disappear in the cause of standardisation., which is essentially a race to the bottom.  In most Countries you will have to do a local Air Legislation test. The American ATR was recognised pretty much world wide at one stage. No one anywhere just lets you jump into one of their planes without some sort of check ride.. Nev

 

 

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I've been studying the air charts here and comparing what we have at home in Oz. Here's what I've discovered different so far...

In Oz, most of our airspace is class G. In the US, it's mostly class E. Class G in the US only extends to either 700' or 1,200' AGL. Then it is class E up to 10,000'AMSL which is class A. If the class E in the US is similar to Oz's class E, that means that anything that flies in class E (ie real airplanes) has to have a transponder. It seems to me that class G in the US is intended for things like model airplanes, drones and model rockets etc.

 

In Oz, I'm not aware of any class B airspace (but could be wrong on this). In the US they do have it. I haven't studied the difference between class B,C and D in the US yet, but I think class D is like our class D, that is like class C with limited hours of operation.

 

Still studying the charts... More later.

 

 

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I've been studying the air charts here and comparing what we have at home in Oz. Here's what I've discovered different so far...

In Oz, most of our airspace is class G. In the US, it's mostly class E. Class G in the US only extends to either 700' or 1,200' AGL. Then it is class E up to 10,000'AMSL which is class A. If the class E in the US is similar to Oz's class E, that means that anything that flies in class E (ie real airplanes) has to have a transponder. It seems to me that class G in the US is intended for things like model airplanes, drones and model rockets etc.

 

In Oz, I'm not aware of any class B airspace (but could be wrong on this). In the US they do have it. I haven't studied the difference between class B,C and D in the US yet, but I think class D is like our class D, that is like class C with limited hours of operation.

 

Still studying the charts... More later.

 

AIUI, you do not need a transponder in US 'E' unless you are within 30 miles of a Class B airport, they call it their "Mode C Veil". Outside that, you can fly VFR-in-E with no transponder.

 

 

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  • 11 months later...

Just to clarify, Class A airspace is generally the airspace from 18,000 feet MSL up to and including flight level (FL) 600, including the airspace overlying the waters within 12 nautical miles (NM) of the coast of the 48 contiguous states and Alaska. The reference to a 10,000 MSL limitation is likely related to the newer Sport Pilot license that was created in conjunction with the LSA aircraft classification. As I recall, the FAA even 'adjusted' the 10K limit for Sport Pilots to allow for up to an additional 2,000' above 10K when overflying high terrain.

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