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Guess the plane


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:hug:Hey turbo, Do you think a wasp would fit in one of the J170s???:thumb_up::thumb_up:

You may have to put a bee in the back to balance it out:laugh:

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

Are you sure it's not P&W 4360, 4 x 9 cyl radials back to back = 36 cyls. Originally designed for the C-46 Curtis Commando to carry frieght over the burma hump in WW2. Also used in Hughes' Spruce Goose (2 different versions) and ultimatly ended up in one of the last Corsair version the F2D made by goodyear. Also used in several other heavy aircraft including the B-36 and maybe the B-50, which was a bigger engined B-29.

 

At the Reno Air races referred to as a 'corncob' because of the cooling ducting running air to all the cylinders. Seen at Reno in the Eighties in 'Super Corsair' a clipped wing corsair, original pilot Tug Malony, but then sold and caught fire at a race in Arizonia, and was destroyed after the lucky pilot bailed.

 

Also fitted to Sea furies for racing at Reno IE: Dreadnaut. Started with 2650hp developed to produce 4300hp as I recall.

 

I knew a bloke who had worked on it's development. He told me they couldn't get the rear cylinders to cool correctly, and it took well over 12 months to do it. That's when they developed the 'corncob' ducting. Strangley this same gentleman had worked on the Saturn 5 rocket that put them on the moon. He said that the 1st stage rocket engine had fuel lines that a small man could crawl through !

 

 

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Guest Maj Millard

Here is one for you all. What was the first engine put into an aircraft that was actually accredited as being the first true aircraft engine, as opposed to being a converted automobile engine ???. Clues: sometime around 1914, Starts with an R, but not Rhone or Rolls Royce.

 

Unfortunatly you might have to wait for about a week for the answer, I'm stirring up the Lightwing early in the morning, and could be away from a computer for a while.................024_cool.gif.7a88a3168ebd868f5549631161e2b369.gif

 

I will get back earlier if I can OK, if it is really driving somebody crazy call me for the answer on 0428 754647. Cheers.

 

 

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Hiho I think the same particularly after reading this.....Wright 1903 Aircraft Engine

However, I look forward to the answer beginning with "R"

 

That's really a good one Maj. I see Rolls Royce made their first aircraft engine in 1914 (as well)

Hehe... we must be all looking up the same things... I've been reading through that site, and also all the others that's out there, but still can't find anything that starts with R, other than Rolls Royce!!036_faint.gif.544c913aae3989c0f13fd9d3b82e4e2c.gif

 

 

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The Moteurs Louis Renault Cie chose the 90 degree V8 as their preferred standard and improved on this basis with continual modifications and upgrading. Although the engines were unspectacular performers they were relaible. As one of the earliest mass producers of aero engines the Moteurs Louis Renault Cie products were copied by others. Most notable amongst the aero engines that used the Renault V8 as the basis was the Royal Aircraft Factory type 1A, better known as the RAF1A. Produced in 1913 it used larger cylinders than the Renault and with other modifications it produced 92hp at 1,600 rpm. The RAF1B, introduced in 1915, was a larger version again giving 115hp at 1,800 rpm. By the production of the RAF1E the engine was producing 150hp. The Renault V8 and the RAF V8 were produced in large numbers and used in a variety of aircraft during World War 1.

 

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Guest Baphomet

3500 HP will get you into trouble, not out of it :-)

 

I think there were almost as many Corsair pilots killed in training as from enemy action

 

 

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Here is one for you all. What was the first engine put into an aircraft that was actually accredited as being the first true aircraft engine, as opposed to being a converted automobile engine ???. Clues: sometime around 1914, Starts with an R, but not Rhone or Rolls Royce.

Hey Maj, Could we hear an answer now? itching to find out what it could be...

 

:thumb_up:

 

 

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