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How Slippery are the A22LS and A32?


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We pull back the throttle to idle opposite the piano keys on downwind, then glide to base & final at 60 kt 2 up & 54 kt solo (54 kt is best glide speed). We also pull on the first stage of flaps after closing the throttle. Depending on wind and judgement you may need to pull 2nd stage for landing.

 

 

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yeah they do stand out don't they - is that a name for the colour - VVV yellow? I'll be doing a TIF in the Gympie A22 on Tuesday 1st May - looking forward to it...

I am pretty sure the colour is called Retina Yellow. Apparently it was going to be used for street signs, like t-intersection signs, but it was too bright.

 

 

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hey birdseye, I remember what my instructor told me about pulling the throttle to idle at the end of downwind - on my first solo...first surprise was the acceleration on takeoff without an instructor in the back seat - Wow, big difference and you had to be on the ball with those pedalsthen I pulled the throttle at the end of downwind and I saw straight away why he said "get that stick forward FAST" - it felt like it hit a brick wall !!!

 

how interesting is that - to have an aircraft that behaves so differently for the student on his first solo - makes you really think about the "high drag low inertia" aspect of the WB Drifter

 

people say if you can fly a Drifter you can fly anything - not so sure about that but for sure it is a real classic little beasty - mine will be back in the air - soon......

 

BP

Your low inertia aircraft had even less inertia without the instructor ballast. Fairly self-evident.
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We pull back the throttle to idle opposite the piano keys on downwind, then glide to base & final at 60 kt 2 up & 54 kt solo (54 kt is best glide speed). We also pull on the first stage of flaps after closing the throttle. Depending on wind and judgement you may need to pull 2nd stage for landing.

That was what I was taught to do when flying the A22, its also what I learnt in PA28s as a glide approach. Use it at a GA airfield and expect comment unless you specifically request a glide approach. A lot to be said for all approaches being glide approaches, but these days people fly GA aircraft circuits like they were in a B747.

 

 

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Judging by some of the earlier comments perhaps it's WA - my 1980s WA number plate slogan was 'State of Excitement'. It was too!

Off track, but 'state of corruption' would have been more appropriate. Fortunately NSW and Victoria took over that mantle a long time ago. Others have picked it up a little later.

 

 

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A long way to send a used aircraft.

This whole thread is in the 'far fetched' category. I really cannot believe that anyone actually believes that a RAA registered aircraft has any significant inertia. FFS, there are fat motorbikes that have more inertia. If this is the level of intelligence in the forum, then go fly paragliders.

 

 

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This whole thread is in the 'far fetched' category. I really cannot believe that anyone actually believes that a RAA registered aircraft has any significant inertia. FFS, there are fat motorbikes that have more inertia. If this is the level of intelligence in the forum, then go fly paragliders.

It's all in the descriptions; the overall message is don't try to teach yourself flying by correspondence; get in the aircraft.
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This whole thread is in the 'far fetched' category. I really cannot believe that anyone actually believes that a RAA registered aircraft has any significant inertia. FFS, there are fat motorbikes that have more inertia. If this is the level of intelligence in the forum, then go fly paragliders.

RAA aircraft do have sufficient inertia to make a difference. Otherwise, draggy RAA aircraft would behave the same as slick RAA. Instead, Foxbat's and Vixxen's behave differently, for example when coming in to land. If RAA aircraft did not have sufficient inertia to make a difference, then speeding up and slowing down would only be a function of engine power and lift required. I would go so far as to say that the concept of inertia is more important in day-to-day RAA aircraft than day-to-day GA: there is greater variability in drag. RAA goes from Drifter to Shark but GA just goes from Cub to Cirrus.

Aircraft is remaining in Queensland.

 

 

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Recently bought an A32. Got about 40 hrs on it now. There was definitely a learning curve to land it - if you don’t get your speed right you can float a long way down the runway. Once you are used to this it is easy to land and lands really short. Side slipping is useful if you find yourself to high on final approach.

 

 

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