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Rotax Rubber Replacement


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2 minutes ago, jackc said:

Al my red hose and worm drive clamps are going in the bin......and I have lots of fire sleeving to do as well.......

The worm drive in the image above looks ok, not a full penetration through the band type.

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2 hours ago, onetrack said:

I would never use anything from Supercheap on an aircraft, because Supercheap focus 100% on the cheapest products they can find, to produce the maximum profit.

There's a lot of rubbishy rubber products that come out of Malaysia, Indonesia and China, that Supercheap mostly specialise in. If you want quality in rubber components, you use Gates products, and Gates Green Stripe where possible.

Anything designed for Marine use normally has superior quality in construction style and materials.

 

Rubber components are the weak link in every engine system. Anything you can do to reduce the amount of rubber in an aircraft is going to appreciably increase that aircrafts safety level.

If it was my choice, and my aircraft (and I don't own an aircraft), I'd be choosing to eliminate as many rubber/rubberised hoses, as I possibly could. 

 

Any hose that is red or yellow coloured has a short life, due to more rapid and more intense UV absorption. Green-coloured hose has the longest life, due to minimal UV absorption.

 

 

Careful there One Track - metal lines (the most likely alternative), are not without problems. Vibration/resonance has been known to fatigue metal tubes, resultant leak over a hot engine may be a bit uncomfortable (me old mate F10 will bee alarmed ).

 

The conservative 5 year Rotax recommendation for the replacement of rubber components, related to the engine, PROVIDED quality products are used (quality does not necessarily = cost) almost guarantees safety in this context.

 

I am 110% with you on the SCA parts - I am am happy to use all sorts of" stuff",  from any source (including Bunnings Aero Space) but draw the line on using anything that may adversely effect the continuance of safe flight.

 

The cheery colouring of hoses, is unlikely to indicate anything about the hoses performance - its a marketing tool. Want to get some idea if a hose will "do the job" for you ? - look up its specifications. No/limited specs - dont purchase.

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2 hours ago, biggles said:

Those open slotted hose clamps sure do damage hoses, particularly if overtightened. These were apparently on a motor vehicle, but have no place on an aircraft engine..... Bob 

Biggles: The overwhelming advice, for years now, from all sorts of interested parties, is not to use traditional worm drive hose clamps on aircraft hoses. There are a number of designs which are okay  - they all provide 360 degree , even pressure without damaging the hose. If you need to clamp tightly, to prevent leakage, you are most likely to be  using the wrong sized hose for the job.

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Those 'double ear' type  have always leaked when using a standard crimper. ( crimp then turn over to crimp the other ear ).

never good.

spacesailor

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, biggles said:

Those open slotted hose clamps sure do damage hoses, particularly if overtightened. These were apparently on a motor vehicle, but have no place on an aircraft engine..... Bob 

I’ve seen slotted type clamps that don’t have slots cut into them, but rather raised ridges that the worm gear screw tightens on, so the band clamping the hose is a solid smooth strap. That should be fine. We bought a whole box of those spring loaded type clamps you need to compress the tangs on the clamp to slide it onto the hose end. They seem good for smaller hose applications, provide an even pressure around the hose I think.

Edited by F10
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Unfortunately this type of occurrence happens all to frequently. Fitting a hose and clamp would seem pretty simple but there are many ways to FU.

 

 

Date Location State Aircraft Model Engine Model Summary
4/4/2021 Shellharbour Airport NSW Aeroprakt A22LS Foxbat Rotax 912ULS STATUS: Review Complete While conducting an overhead departure at approx. 1700 feet, an engine t... 
STATUS: Review Complete While conducting an overhead departure at approx. 1700 feet, an engine temperature warning was heard via the headset. The cylinder head temperature was at the end of the range, in the red. Throttle was reduced to idle, a descent was made to the downwind leg of the active runway (34), and an uneventful landing was made with a tight circuit. An inspection revealed that the coolant hose had fully detached. An uneventful preflight check and run-up was conducted prior to flight with no sign off detachment of the the coolant hose. Members are reminded of the importance of conducting a thorough pre-flight inspection, including the removal of engine cowls to check for any potential concerns, prior to flight.
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Posted (edited)
26 minutes ago, F10 said:

I’ve seen slotted type clamps that don’t have slots cut into them, but rather raised ridges that the worm gear screw tightens on, so the band clamping the hose is a solid smooth strap. That should be fine. We bought a whole box of those spring loaded type clamps you need to compress the tangs on the clamp to slide it onto the hose end. They seem good for smaller hose applications, provide an even pressure around the hose I think.

As far as I know, unless you specify fuel injected (FI) clamps, you will not get the ones that resist damage to the hose. Your "garden" variety clamp does not have the extended "tongue" to prevent pinching. 

 

Personally I would have reservations about using the"spring loaded" clamps on an aircraft, however my Ford Ranger has them on all hoses, big & small, and they seem to be quite effective. My guess is that the "key" to using them is being anal about size matching.

Edited by skippydiesel
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